tundra brake problems

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Thread: tundra brake problems

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    Junior Member silverTRD's Avatar
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    Thumbs down tundra brake problems

    i went and got my breaks serviced yesterday and the guy at the shop told me that tundras have inherant brake problems. this guy happens to be a friend of mine and i trust him, although this is only ONE guys profesional opinion. he said that tundras have a proportiong valve problem. basically, the valve comes out of adjustment too quickly. and what happens is when the valve is out of adjustment, there is not enough pressure to the rear brakes so basically the rear drums dont work. so you can imagine how this would affect the front brakes on a 4,000 lb. truck. so it wears brake components down at a rate faster than normal. he told me that i can bring it in every 3-4 months and they will inspect them and adjust the valve or whatever else needs adjusted for free. just giving you guys a heads up.

    michael
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    Never heard of this one.
    I got 40k on my factory brakes, and at 68000, the second set is doing fine.
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    KLS
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    The proportioning valve is a tightly set linkage, and pressure valves connected into the brake system are needed to correctly adjust it.

    What really does happen is that folks don't use their parking brake, which also adjusts the rear brake shoes. This may cause a loss of rear braking efficiency. Set and release your parking brake at least a couple of times weekly.


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    Veteran Member UsE_To_RoCk's Avatar
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    My only brake problem is my front left caliper squeaking like hell. What should I do? I scream at the sky with not reply...what should I do.
    Also the sh*t Toyota Oem Pads keep chunking. My left rotor is blue. F-you Toyota. I'd buy a Dubcab in a second though, if they would change the front back to the 00-02 style. Mmmm. Seriously what the hell is wrong with my brakes?

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    Supercharged Member v8Toilet's Avatar
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    The proportioning valve in the Tundra is a height sensing adjustable valve. The valve is connected to the rear axle by a small articulating arm that allows the valve to adjust to the bed height as the suspension is compressed. The idea is that when you add weight to the bed it compresses the suspension and collapses the attaching arm to the proportioning valve and letís more brake pressure reach the rear brakes.

    These valves have been used for decades and as far as I know donít loose there adjustment. What I do think happens is that the rear mechanical brake adjusters in the drums that keep the brake shoes close to the drum donít work that well. As the shoes wear they get farther from the drum and the rear braking becomes less affective as a result. The brake pedal also engages closer to the floor.
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    What KLS said. Many drum brake systems have used the e-brake for adjustment; in fact, I used to pull up the handbrake a few times in my 1972 240-Z race car about halfway through a sprint race just to tighten up the drums. Worked like a charm.

    Your tech friend may be thinking of the previous-generation full-size GMC pickups and Suburbans, which are notorious for allowing the rear drums to go out of adjustment. By contrast, my 2002 Tundra has excellent brakes for feel, response, and stopping distance. I cannot get these brakes to do anything wrong! They are exceptionally good on all surfaces. Recently had the dealer check all brakes per tsb. They looked almost new at 32k.

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    Lurking Member USMCMAI's Avatar
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    Unhappy Not a new issue!

    Quote Originally Posted by UsE_To_RoCk
    My only brake problem is my front left caliper squeaking like hell. What should I do? Mmmm. Seriously what the hell is wrong with my brakes?
    I'm having the same problem right now. I took it into Toyota for a brake inspection and was told that my rotors needed to be resurfaced. They said when my brakes where done two weeks ago and rotors turned, they had turned them too fast which causes I forget what.

    I share the same burden SilverTRD does. I am on my third Brake pad set At 40,500 miles. I knew about using your parking brake and always use it when I park my truck. I love my Tundra though. I just can't wait until NAPA makes ceramic brake pads for my truck so I don't have to keep paying $110 for the pads alone.

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    Veteran Member mitchr's Avatar
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    I have had the rear brake problem(rear end hop) since my truck was new. As I was reading this about the proportioning valve theory one thing came to mind. About the only time I notice the rear end hop during braking is when I am going down hill in the Tundra at 45+ mph. At least this is when it does it the worst. It was stated above that the rear bed level effects the proportioning valve and the amount of rear brake pressure applied to the rear drums. If I am going down a hill with no load in the bed and hit the brakes it would raise the rear of the truck up. I don't really know what this all means, but would it have the opposite effect on the brakes? I am beggining to think maybe there is a problem with the way some of these valves are behaving. Of course when I take my truck in for brake repairs it will usually be vibration free for 1000-1500 miles and the vibrations will reapear.

    Mitch

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    Quote Originally Posted by silverTRD
    i went and got my breaks serviced yesterday and the guy at the shop told me that tundras have inherant brake problems. this guy happens to be a friend of mine and i trust him, although this is only ONE guys profesional opinion. he said that tundras have a proportiong valve problem. basically, the valve comes out of adjustment too quickly. and what happens is when the valve is out of adjustment, there is not enough pressure to the rear brakes so basically the rear drums dont work. so you can imagine how this would affect the front brakes on a 4,000 lb. truck. so it wears brake components down at a rate faster than normal. he told me that i can bring it in every 3-4 months and they will inspect them and adjust the valve or whatever else needs adjusted for free. just giving you guys a heads up.

    michael

    But my truck seems to brake alot better with a load in the bed (with the proportioning valve depressed). Might be on to something here!!

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    Supporter lelandstanford's Avatar
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    Mitchr:

    Your rear drums are warping under long braking (downhill). They have nothing to to with load sensing valve. The lightweight OEM drums have low heat capacity and cheap organic shoes generate too much heat per required friction.

    2005 Tacoma AC 2WD 2.7L 5M

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    Junior Member MrBeanley's Avatar
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    Default Downhill shouldn't be a problem

    Hey, Mitch.

    The proportioning valve doesn't work off the bed angle, as it relates to the ground. Its more about the distance between the bottom of the truck bed and the top of the rear differential housing. The proportioning valve works by sending more "brake juice" to the rears when there is a load in the bed than it does when you are unloaded. Its figures out when you're loaded by how high above the rear diff. carrier the rear frame of the truck is.

    So, whether you're going uphill or downhill (i.e. the angle the bed makes with the ground) doesn't really matter, except for how it shifts the weight of the truck. You know, going uphill there's more weight on the back axel - coming down the same hill there's more weight on the front axel.

    hth

    Quote Originally Posted by mitchr
    I have had the rear brake problem(rear end hop) since my truck was new. As I was reading this about the proportioning valve theory one thing came to mind. About the only time I notice the rear end hop during braking is when I am going down hill in the Tundra at 45+ mph. At least this is when it does it the worst. It was stated above that the rear bed level effects the proportioning valve and the amount of rear brake pressure applied to the rear drums. If I am going down a hill with no load in the bed and hit the brakes it would raise the rear of the truck up. I don't really know what this all means, but would it have the opposite effect on the brakes? I am beggining to think maybe there is a problem with the way some of these valves are behaving. Of course when I take my truck in for brake repairs it will usually be vibration free for 1000-1500 miles and the vibrations will reapear.

    Mitch
    MrBeanley
    Glenville, New York
    2004 Tundra Double Cab 4x4


  13. #12
    KLS
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    Quote Originally Posted by USMCMAI
    I share the same burden SilverTRD does. I am on my third Brake pad set At 40,500 miles. I knew about using your parking brake and always use it when I park my truck. I love my Tundra though. I just can't wait until NAPA makes ceramic brake pads for my truck so I don't have to keep paying $110 for the pads alone.
    NAPA doesn't make parts...they just resell parts from others. Raybestos makes their Professional Grade pads for the Tundra...PGD812M or ---QS for the early calipers with 4.7" long pads, and PGD976M for the late calipers with 5.3" long pads. $31.79 at Rockauto.com

    You guys with short brake life must drive in tough traffic. Many of us are getting 40+,000 miles on the original brakes.


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  14. #13
    Junior Member JeffD's Avatar
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    I do mostly easy highway driving, with some trailer towing. I have nearly 200K on a 2000 tundra 4x4 ltd. I have not yet gotten more than 25-30K out of a set of front pads and discs. I use the parking brake regularly. I have trailer brakes on my trailer, the trailer actually slows down the truck when I hit the brakes. I replaced the rear shoes and drums for the first time at 170k, the fronts I had replaced twice under warranty, then again about every 25K miles. I towed the same trailers with my old F150 and replaced the front pads the first time at 80K, and the second time at 150k.

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    Junior Member BirdDog0's Avatar
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    Coming on 84K and still on the original brakes...front and back. Had to have the rear drums turned a few years back due to some high mountain roading with longs, steep curvy gravel roads ending suddenly with deep stream crossing...warped my rear drums almost instantly....but...that's metal for ya.
    I spent the $30 at Midas and had them resurfaced on my way home.

    Still looking over 50% life on the front pads and rear shoes.

    I stand firm on the driving habits, and driving locations theories...
    If you can lay off the gas a little, you can lay off the brake a little...it's science

    BTW, I use my parking brake everytime I shut the truck off or put in P. Saves just that little bit more wear and tear off the tranny.
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    Veteran Member mitchr's Avatar
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    Unhappy

    Quote Originally Posted by BirdDog0
    I stand firm on the driving habits, and driving locations theories...
    If you can lay off the gas a little, you can lay off the brake a little...it's science

    BTW, I use my parking brake everytime I shut the truck off or put in P. Saves just that little bit more wear and tear off the tranny.
    Definitely driving locations; when you live at the bottom of a mile long very steep hill you gota lay on the brakes a little more than most people and then you have to climb that hill to go anywhere so it eats up alot of brakes and gas. :cry:

    Mitch

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