Winter driving on the highway in 4x4

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Thread: Winter driving on the highway in 4x4

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    Default Winter driving on the highway in 4x4

    I'm just curious to see how many people drive on a highway, 60mph or more, with their trucks in 4x4. I live in ND, and in the early and late winter, the roads get pretty icy due to thawing and freezing. Sometimes you can't even tell that its ice on the road. I don't want to go sliding or spinning out of control on the highway. I also don't want to put too much strain on the drivetrain by driving in 4x4 too much, if thats even possible.
    Troy
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    Default Re: Winter driving on the highway in 4x4

    you do not want to drive in 4wd in slippery condition over 35mph or so. you actually slide more. your wheel rolling diameter is different front and rear. use 4wf to get going only.
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    Default Re: Winter driving on the highway in 4x4

    I've driven 65 in 4wd, no problems. But a note to point out: if you need 4wd, you probably shouldn't be going that fast 4wd is no solution to bad driving decisions. and no replacement for good driving skills.

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    Default Re: Winter driving on the highway in 4x4

    You got different size tires front from rear?

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    Default Re: Winter driving on the highway in 4x4

    Quote Originally Posted by Jodan View Post
    You got different size tires front from rear?
    slightly...


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    Default Re: Winter driving on the highway in 4x4

    didn't say different tire size, said different "rolling diameter", lemme clarify. though all four tires are the same, the front is heavier than the rear, this squats the front tires down, ultimately reducing your rolling diameter versus the rear. when rolling in 4wd, the lighter rear end will drag slightly because the heavier front end has more traction, something has to give and it's the lesser traction rear, the faster you go the more the drag. you rear are actually sliding, sliding means loss of traction. you ever wonder why when you disengage 4wd you get a slight clunk, thats the binding releasing. sure you get minimal binding in slippery condition, that's because your wheel are slipping.

    used 4wd to get only, as said earlier, if you need 4wd at that speed, you going too fast for the condition.
    Last edited by ricqik; 12-05-2008 at 08:20 PM.
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    Default Re: Winter driving on the highway in 4x4

    I have left mine in 4HI for entire winters, prolonged highway speeds, hard pulling etc. Never had issues with this or any other 4x4 I have had.

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    Default Re: Winter driving on the highway in 4x4

    Quote Originally Posted by Burger Steak & Eggs View Post
    I have left mine in 4HI for entire winters, prolonged highway speeds, hard pulling etc. Never had issues with this or any other 4x4 I have had.
    I concur, I've had 3 4x4's and I've driven all of them 55 - 65 the entire winter.No problems at all.

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    Default Re: Winter driving on the highway in 4x4

    Quote Originally Posted by ricqik View Post
    you do not want to drive in 4wd in slippery condition over 35mph or so. you actually slide more. your wheel rolling diameter is different front and rear. use 4wf to get going only.
    Here is a classic example of not to believe everything you read on the Internet. Ricqik, please tell me you recently moved to MN from the deep South and are just ignorant about 4X4 or that you simply had too much too drink and were trying to be funny when you composed this post?

    Use your 4X4 on slippery roads, that is one of the reasons it was developed for.

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    Default Re: Winter driving on the highway in 4x4

    yeah, i've done 65 in 4WD for a while too, driving back to long island from Maine. just have to remember, 4WD improves the ability to move, but does NOT do anything to help you stop faster, brakes are brakes. 4WD is not gonna help you stop
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    Default Re: Winter driving on the highway in 4x4

    Quote Originally Posted by sporto View Post
    Here is a classic example of not to believe everything you read on the Internet. Ricqik, please tell me you recently moved to MN from the deep South and are just ignorant about 4X4 or that you simply had too much too drink and were trying to be funny when you composed this post?

    Use your 4X4 on slippery roads, that is one of the reasons it was developed for.
    no, 4wd was developed to get and keep the vehicle moving so it doesn't get stuck. when you understand more , then come back and we'll talk.
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    Default Re: Winter driving on the highway in 4x4

    rolling diameter is the same front and rear. if the front has 10# and the rear has 50# the rolling diameter will still be the same. the sidewalls may bulge out more but these tires have steel belts that do not grow. american trucks (used to) have different ratios front to rear, ie: 4:10 front and 4:11 rear. this is dangerous on ice. toyotas use the same diffs front and rear, HOWEVER driving on ice over 60 is very dangerous period. doug

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    Default Re: Winter driving on the highway in 4x4

    Quote Originally Posted by dougg View Post
    rolling diameter is the same front and rear. if the front has 10# and the rear has 50# the rolling diameter will still be the same. the sidewalls may bulge out more but these tires have steel belts that do not grow. doug
    you're crazy if you think it still has the same rolling diameter. the sidewall bulges for a reason, to take up for the smaller rolling diameter, what do you think happends to the outer most diameter(the tread), it actually folds inward, to also take up for the rollingdiameter. i tell you too, when you understand, come back and we'll talk.
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    Default Re: Winter driving on the highway in 4x4

    ricqik is 100% right. I am a mechanical engineer (that works on large powertrains) so I know what I'm talking about. Think about it. The radius of the tire from the center of the wheel spindle/shaft to the road is different when you have more weight or less weight on the tire. More bulge=smaller radius=smaller diamter=has to spin more revolutions to have the same surface speed at the outer diameter as a larger (less bulged) tire.

    The main factor of why you need to be careful, especially at faster speeds, in 4wd in trucks, such as our tundra is that there is no center differential!!! Which means at any given time in 4wd you have power to TWO tires, one front tire and one rear tire (assuming you don't have a locker engaged on the front or rear differential, which negates the differential). If we had a a center differential, at the transfer case, then power would go to only one tire. So, with the front and rear axles locked at the transfer case, it actually induces slipping around turns. The front end has a differential, so the outer tire can spin faster on a turn. The rear end has a differential, so the outer tire can spin faster on a turn. But, the tires on one end of the truck (front vs rear) need to spin faster. Not having a center differrential at the transfer casee, causes loading and slipping of the drivetrain.

    So, with different "actual" diameter tires (due to weight difference, tire pressure, tire wear, etc), you are inducing slipping/loading of the drivetrain while going straight (not just turning), because the front axle can't spin at a different speed then a rear axle.
    This is why you should NEVER drive in 4wd on dry pavement. A short while, like if you forget isn't going to hurt, as the tire will slip before the drivetrain breaks, but you are stressing the drivetrain.

    AWD like in a Rav4 is different. You have center differential, so you can drive full time in 4wd. But in AWD (without traction control, etc), if one tire slips, then all the power goes to that tire and you won't move. This is why we have traction control and a lock for the center differential in most of these vehicles (like the Rav4), so you can get at least 2 tires spinning if you get stuck.

    EDIT:
    I forgot to add, the higher the speed you are gong with the "actual" diameters of tires being different, the more slipping/loading of the drivetrain you are inducing. Hence why you shouldn't travel at high speeds in 4wd (AWD with the center differential active is fine for high speeds).

    That being said, I have gone on the highway in the winter (on snow) in 4wd hi. You just need to be aware of this and be careful around turns, where more slipping is induced. I also only travel in winter in my truck in snow tires, which helps a great deal.
    Last edited by adamjt; 12-06-2008 at 09:40 AM.

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    Default Re: Winter driving on the highway in 4x4




    That is all i have to express how i feel over this thread.

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