Oil turns milk white under oil cap

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Thread: Oil turns milk white under oil cap

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    Default Oil turns milk white under oil cap

    I have a 2003 V-8 tundra. 4,800 miles so far. I've noticed recently that the oil under the oil cap has turned milky white. I live in Georgia and we hit winter about a month ago which is about the same time I noticed it. The oil on the dipstick appears normal and I've had no driveability issues.

    I've called several dealers and one told me that I have a blown head gasket. Another said they don't know, bring it in. I have since searched the internet and found out that your oil can turn milky white under the oil cap due to incomplete warm ups and short trips in cold weather.

    Anyone have any ideas???
    Changed the oil at 1300 (toyota dealer)
    Changed again at 4200 myself castrol gtx 5w30, purolator premium filter
    (I know synthetic is better but I plan to change it every 3000).

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    Default Oil Turns Milky White Under Oil Cap

    I have a 2003 V-8 tundra. 4,800 miles so far. I've noticed recently that the oil under the oil cap has turned milky white. I live in Georgia and we hit winter about a month ago which is about the same time I noticed it. The oil on the dipstick appears normal and I've had no driveability issues.

    I've called several dealers and one told me that I have a blown head gasket. Another said they don't know, bring it in. I have since searched the internet and found out that your oil can turn milky white under the oil cap due to incomplete warm ups and short trips in cold weather.

    Anyone have any ideas???
    Changed the oil at 1300 (toyota dealer)
    Changed again at 4200 myself castrol gtx 5w30, purolator premium filter
    (I know synthetic is better but I plan to change it every 3000).

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    milky white, coolant getting into your oil. If you can still drive it, dont think its a blown head gasket

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    I wouldn't worry,it's just condensation at the cap area mixing with oil vapors.

    If it were a blown headgasket or cracked block/heads,you'd be loosing coolant,white smoke will be coming out the exhaust,and the engine will probably be misfiring and overheating. You'll also find a "chocolate milkshake" mix when draining the oil
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    If it was just under the cap you're fine and it's just condensation/incomplete warm-up. If it appears in the main bulk of your oil, I'd suspect a coolant leak/head gasket kind of thing.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt25
    I have a 2003 V-8 tundra. 4,800 miles so far. I've noticed recently that the oil under the oil cap has turned milky white. I live in Georgia and we hit winter about a month ago which is about the same time I noticed it. The oil on the dipstick appears normal and I've had no driveability issues.

    I've called several dealers and one told me that I have a blown head gasket. Another said they don't know, bring it in. I have since searched the internet and found out that your oil can turn milky white under the oil cap due to incomplete warm ups and short trips in cold weather.

    Anyone have any ideas???
    Changed the oil at 1300 (toyota dealer)
    Changed again at 4200 myself castrol gtx 5w30, purolator premium filter
    (I know synthetic is better but I plan to change it every 3000).
    If you're getting a lot of moisture buildup (that's what it is) you might try to spend more time in prolonged driving (at one time) to drive the moisture from the oil and heat up the engine. (Bunch of some short trips into one long one.....)

    Another alternative is to run synthetic it's not as prone to doing this as regular oil. If you don't do anything different from what your'e doing now to minimize it, I'd definitely change the oil at 3,000 miles.

    I'm surprise you're seeing this in Georgia. If you were in Wisconsin, Illinois, Maine, etc. where it *does* get cold you're more likely to see this.

    It's not too big a deal, but don't leave that moisture laden oil in the engine for prolonged (like 6 months) periods. *DO NOT* store the vehicle with this oil in it!! (not that you were planning to....)

    I'd also think about putting some kind of a deposit reducing additive in like BG to break up the scum that's also forming on your valve covers. It's NOT just on your cap. It will stop in the spring, but meanwhile you can have a bit of buildup on your upper engine that won't come off with normal (meaning plain oil unless it's synthetic) oil changes. It's kind of like brushing your teeth. If you don't clean them for a year at all and then try to brush them four times a day to make up for the non-brushing - it's just not the same as doing it daily the whole time. You have to resort to "heavy duty" means to break up the buildup.

    If you run synthetic it's overkill to put anything more in. Some will help, but many are just wasting dollars. Some can even be harmful and that's much worse than not putting anything in- like too much of a PFTE additive that has broken down and turned to acids.

    But regular oil can definitely be improved with a *good* (with the emphasis on good) additive package. Synthetics usually have a full package with much better additives. They can be improved but it's kind of like raising the top end of a car from 110 mph to 150 mph - where the heck are you ever going to use the delta? (in the US)

    Alan

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    Default Thanx

    Thanks fellas. I took a 500 mile trip this weekend and the "milk" under the cap went away. The temp in Ga dipped into the twenties two weeks ago and my trips were mostly less than 6 miles (ie. to and from work). In the morning i rarely get up early enough to let my engine warm up like it should. I'm not a morning person so I just get in, let it heat up for 10 seconds, and take off. It runs great and a I love it. I'm definitely changing every 3000 miles. I know synthetics are superior but I'm so paranoid that even if I did buy synthetic I'd still be changing it every 3000. Thanks again.
    Matt

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    Default georgia tundra

    Quote Originally Posted by akauth
    If you're getting a lot of moisture buildup (that's what it is) you might try to spend more time in prolonged driving (at one time) to drive the moisture from the oil and heat up the engine. (Bunch of some short trips into one long one.....)

    Another alternative is to run synthetic it's not as prone to doing this as regular oil. If you don't do anything different from what your'e doing now to minimize it, I'd definitely change the oil at 3,000 miles.

    I'm surprise you're seeing this in Georgia. If you were in Wisconsin, Illinois, Maine, etc. where it *does* get cold you're more likely to see this.

    It's not too big a deal, but don't leave that moisture laden oil in the engine for prolonged (like 6 months) periods. *DO NOT* store the vehicle with this oil in it!! (not that you were planning to....)

    I'd also think about putting some kind of a deposit reducing additive in like BG to break up the scum that's also forming on your valve covers. It's NOT just on your cap. It will stop in the spring, but meanwhile you can have a bit of buildup on your upper engine that won't come off with normal (meaning plain oil unless it's synthetic) oil changes. It's kind of like brushing your teeth. If you don't clean them for a year at all and then try to brush them four times a day to make up for the non-brushing - it's just not the same as doing it daily the whole time. You have to resort to "heavy duty" means to break up the buildup.

    If you run synthetic it's overkill to put anything more in. Some will help, but many are just wasting dollars. Some can even be harmful and that's much worse than not putting anything in- like too much of a PFTE additive that has broken down and turned to acids.

    But regular oil can definitely be improved with a *good* (with the emphasis on good) additive package. Synthetics usually have a full package with much better additives. They can be improved but it's kind of like raising the top end of a car from 110 mph to 150 mph - where the heck are you ever going to use the delta? (in the US)

    Alan

    This is an Intresting post because I just noted a slight problem on the same topic and searching for this tread on ts (white milkey residue on my engine cap top from 2 days ago) and yea Georgia once again just recently had ice and snow. I am really not sure why this is happening on the tundra v8 never seen this before but I am closely waching it I just got the timing belt deal done which consisted of a new water Pump (o ring) cam and crank seal's and new engine acc belt.I did take the Tundra to my dealership and got a second opinion he told me it's a good ideal to replace the engine oil when doing the water pump something about cross contimation and that may be why I have this white residue on my engine cap does this make any since? Not sure if that is right but I am still waching it i've been under the impression white residue on cap or oil for that madder mean's a serious engine problem or blowen head gasket yet my Tundra rides ok and there is no blue smoke period coming from the rear and everything seem's to be "ok".I did let Cobb Toyota perform the oil change today since the redo of the timing belt's was performed 01/24/05 and I wanted to make sure any residue from that job was out of my oil .Truck has allways had oil changes since new every 3k at cobb toyota and right now I am at 111k and never towed anything heavy (period) but this white residue is a big question mark that is going to be closely watched

    link below show's the old part's replaced.....


    http://www.tundrasolutions.com/photo...cat/500/page/1

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    This happened once on my wifes old Jetta during the winter in PA. It never did it again. I asked the dealership and they knew about it. They called it "pancake batter" due to the color and consistency. They said don't worry about it. Just change the oil like normal. Did you run through any flood water?
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    Quote Originally Posted by EricZ
    This happened once on my wifes old Jetta during the winter in PA. It never did it again. I asked the dealership and they knew about it. They called it "pancake batter" due to the color and consistency. They said don't worry about it. Just change the oil like normal. Did you run through any flood water?
    that's what it looked like on the oil cap( small amount's of pancake batter) and no i haven't ran into any flood water's at all truck stayes bone dry except the engine steam cleaning I do once in a wile..

    i'll check the dipstick tommorrow and post a picture of the finding's with the new oil

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    Quote Originally Posted by TUNDRAV8GEORGIA
    that's what it looked like on the oil cap( small amount's of pancake batter) and no i haven't ran into any flood water's at all truck stayes bone dry except the engine steam cleaning I do once in a wile..

    i'll check the dipstick tommorrow and post a picture of the finding's with the new oil
    I wouldn't sweat it. It's just moisture condensing from the crankcase during normal operation when it's not getting hot enough to vaporize the excess - so it condenses as sludge.

    It's pretty common during cold weather (more common during *really* cold weather where the engine can sometimes barely warm up unless you're driving for a half hour minimum each time.)

    If you change the oil you should reduce the problem temporarily. But moisture depositing will return unless you get the oil hot enough to really vaporize any water that may condense into the oil.

    If you can't run the engine regularly to really heat up the oil to get the moisture out, then just change it so you can start over again (recollecting moisture in the oil but having it at low amounts - same as if you have gasoline bleeding into the oil slowly).

    The best thing is to get the engine up to operating temperatures for a good half hour a day.

    NOTE: Not that this matters in Georgia, but using a dipstick oil warmer will also really accelerate this process and isn't wise. I don't advise using one of those during really cold weather. A trickle charger to keep keep the battery warm and charged is a better solution to guarantee a start during really, really cold weather.



    Alan

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    Quote Originally Posted by akauth
    I wouldn't sweat it. It's just moisture condensing from the crankcase during normal operation when it's not getting hot enough to vaporize the excess - so it condenses as sludge.
    Yup,that's exactly what it is.
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    My next suggestion was to ask if you spray water on the engine to clean it. You could be getting water past a seal like the oil filler cap or something. Don't overdo it with the pressure. I know from past experience to never pressure wash around seals. I have forced dirt and water into "sealed" dirt bike suspension linkages. You can do more harm than good.
    2004 Tundra Access Cab cold piston slapping V8 TRD Natural flat "clay bar?! haha I barely even wash it" white. Faded but still there Line-X bedliner, NASTA polished by a guardrail stainless steel nerf bars bolted to a rusty then coated in grease frame, 22" stainless steel Magnaflow droning muffler with stock tailpipe, Daystar 1" front leveling kit that now sits higher than the many times overloaded rear, bald and too expensive to replace Michelin LTX 265/75/16 tires, Hellwig rear sway bar kit cause everyone else was doing it, Custom paint job by "F**k I forgot to lift the mower deck going over the gravel driveway again", PA whitetail buck modified driver's side. Paid for and runs like a top.

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    Got my truck 4 weeks ago, had 20 miles on it when I got it. Hit 950 miles today so I changed the oil. Found that pancake looking stuff under the oil cap. Truck runs perfect and there is nothing out of the ordinary to make me feel like somethings wrong.

    its been 5 to 40 degrees here in Colorado lately.

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