Toyota Tundra and Slide in Truck Campers

  1. Welcome to Toyota Tundra Forums : Tundra Solutions Forums – General discussion forum for Toyota Trucks

    Welcome to Toyota Tundra Forums : Tundra Solutions Forums - a website dedicated to all things Toyota Tundra.

    You are currently viewing our forum as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our community, at no cost, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is free, fast and simple, Join Toyota Tundra Forums : Tundra Solutions Forums today!
     
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 28

Thread: Toyota Tundra and Slide in Truck Campers

  1. #1
    Rookie
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    4
    Liked
    1 times
    Rep Power
    0

    Question Toyota Tundra and Slide in Truck Campers

    New to tundrasolutions.com but been finding lots of information, great site, definitely one of the best. The one thing I haven’t been able to find was if any one has specifically talked about slide in truck campers? I have found lots of information on towing, but unsure how much of it applies. I just got a new 2005 Tundra DC and was wondering if anyone out there was hauling a slide-in truck camper? I have been thinking of getting one of the small 6.5' pop up types that seem to range in weight from 1000-1400lbs depending on MFG. I have a couple of question:

    Has anyone had issues with Tundras and Truck Campers (the small ones)?

    What’s your opinion on Air Bags? I hear they help handling when hauling something like a camper.

    What type of Camper tie-downs are you using, Happijack, torklift?

    Other general issues concerns?

    I have come across a used Northstar 6.5’ dry weight 1200lbs. I am trying to find out more before I take the next step. Obviously the lighter the better and I am trying to balance the amenities with overall weight but also interested in just how much a Tundra can handle and what helps.

    Sorry about all of the question, but a newbie to Tundras as my previous truck was too small and wimpy to mention. Been loving the truck, love the ride, and it definitely beat all of the competition!!!


  2. Remove Advertisements
    Toyota Tundra Forum
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Supporter cubic22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Fort Worth
    Age
    33
    Posts
    1,257
    Liked
    0 times
    Rep Power
    1225

    Talking

    Welcome to Tundra Solutions dkocol!

    Don't worry about all the questions, but since you have been here a couple months but haven't posted up I need to welcome you properly. Welcome. I have seen a few threads and did a search below are a few of the returns from "Tundra Campers". FEEL FREE to take some time and browse through the various forums on TS.com If you are somewhat confused as to where to post a question, read the sub-caps within the forum or use the SEARCH feature that will locate the topic that you are interested in. An informative posting is New Members Help with several links to questions you may have about TS.com If you haven't signed up already as a club member you might want to consider it. Check out the Sample Technical Database for a preview on what club membership gets you.


    You can send a PM to any of
    The TS.com Team if you need any help or assistance.

    We will be looking forward to your postings!


    Anyone with camper or info on campers

    http://www.tundrasolutions.com/forum...t=truck+camper

    Tundra and truck campers?

    fiberglass camper
    JOHN

  4. #3
    Junior Member bennicde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Stewiacke, NS
    Posts
    457
    Liked
    2 times
    Rep Power
    16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dkocol
    New to tundrasolutions.com but been finding lots of information, great site, definitely one of the best. The one thing I haven’t been able to find was if any one has specifically talked about slide in truck campers? I have found lots of information on towing, but unsure how much of it applies. I just got a new 2005 Tundra DC and was wondering if anyone out there was hauling a slide-in truck camper? I have been thinking of getting one of the small 6.5' pop up types that seem to range in weight from 1000-1400lbs depending on MFG. I have a couple of question:

    Has anyone had issues with Tundras and Truck Campers (the small ones)?

    What’s your opinion on Air Bags? I hear they help handling when hauling something like a camper.

    What type of Camper tie-downs are you using, Happijack, torklift?

    Other general issues concerns?

    I have come across a used Northstar 6.5’ dry weight 1200lbs. I am trying to find out more before I take the next step. Obviously the lighter the better and I am trying to balance the amenities with overall weight but also interested in just how much a Tundra can handle and what helps.

    Sorry about all of the question, but a newbie to Tundras as my previous truck was too small and wimpy to mention. Been loving the truck, love the ride, and it definitely beat all of the competition!!!

    I had one of those pop-up type campers on my Tacoma. Hauls real nice because the center of gravity is so low. It's just like having a load in the bed without the handling issues you normally get with a high camper. I don't think you need anything else on a Tundra to carry a 1200 lb one of these, it should handle it fine.

  5. #4
    Rookie Hairwing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Eatonville, WA near Mt. Rainier
    Posts
    11
    Liked
    0 times
    Rep Power
    0

    Default Toyota Tundra and Slide in Truck Campers

    Quote Originally Posted by bennicde
    I don't think you need anything else on a Tundra to carry a 1200 lb one of these, it should handle it fine.


    I have a 2003 Tundra Ltd. I carry an older - 1989 version - 7.5 foot Lance Squire slide in truck camper - made for import trucks. It weighs just at 1000 lbs wet (with water, propane and supplies on board) but really sunk the rear of the truck too low when I first loaded it. I had some frame bolt-on type tie-downs ($225) and a set of Ride-Rite air springs ($400) installed. the Ride-Rites leveled the load easily and made steering and handling feel normal.

    I had to build a simple wood frame box to elevate the camper a couple of inches off the truck bed - for the camper overhead to clear my cab.

    The Tundra doesn't seem to really notice that the camper is there. It drives and handles well - although I only get about 12 - 13 mpg going over the mountain passes here in Western WA.

    It is hard to find a hard sided camper that is within the payload capacity of the Tundra - especially if you want a self contained bathroom and most of the other options that people feel they need. All I have in my camper is stove, refrig., sink, bed, table, table seating and one small closet. Certainly enough for me and my steelhead pursuits.

  6. #5
    Rookie
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Cardiff, CA
    Posts
    1
    Liked
    0 times
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    We previously had a Callen camper (El Cajon, Ca) on a 2000 Tundra which met our needs at the time. We've recently moved up to a pop-up camper from Four Wheel campers (Wodland, CA) on our '05 Tundra. It's been quite good so far. We bought the stripped down model which weighs under 700 pounds. It has a welded aluminum frame. We were impressed by how well one worked on a friend's Ford on some trips to Baja on some pretty bad roads (we've been traveling to Baja for over 30 years and know what bad roads are). Check out their website for mounting details.

    Quote Originally Posted by dkocol
    New to tundrasolutions.com but been finding lots of information, great site, definitely one of the best. The one thing I haven’t been able to find was if any one has specifically talked about slide in truck campers? I have found lots of information on towing, but unsure how much of it applies. I just got a new 2005 Tundra DC and was wondering if anyone out there was hauling a slide-in truck camper? I have been thinking of getting one of the small 6.5' pop up types that seem to range in weight from 1000-1400lbs depending on MFG. I have a couple of question:

    Has anyone had issues with Tundras and Truck Campers (the small ones)?

    What’s your opinion on Air Bags? I hear they help handling when hauling something like a camper.

    What type of Camper tie-downs are you using, Happijack, torklift?

    Other general issues concerns?

    I have come across a used Northstar 6.5’ dry weight 1200lbs. I am trying to find out more before I take the next step. Obviously the lighter the better and I am trying to balance the amenities with overall weight but also interested in just how much a Tundra can handle and what helps.

    Sorry about all of the question, but a newbie to Tundras as my previous truck was too small and wimpy to mention. Been loving the truck, love the ride, and it definitely beat all of the competition!!!


  7. #6
    Supporter RockyMtnRay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Posts
    1,231
    Liked
    0 times
    Rep Power
    13

    Default Using a truck camper is a very BAD idea with a Double Cab

    Quote Originally Posted by dkocol
    New to tundrasolutions.com but been finding lots of information, great site, definitely one of the best. The one thing I haven’t been able to find was if any one has specifically talked about slide in truck campers? I have found lots of information on towing, but unsure how much of it applies. I just got a new 2005 Tundra DC and was wondering if anyone out there was hauling a slide-in truck camper? I have been thinking of getting one of the small 6.5' pop up types that seem to range in weight from 1000-1400lbs depending on MFG. I have a couple of question:

    Has anyone had issues with Tundras and Truck Campers (the small ones)?

    What’s your opinion on Air Bags? I hear they help handling when hauling something like a camper.

    What type of Camper tie-downs are you using, Happijack, torklift?

    Other general issues concerns?

    I have come across a used Northstar 6.5’ dry weight 1200lbs. I am trying to find out more before I take the next step. Obviously the lighter the better and I am trying to balance the amenities with overall weight but also interested in just how much a Tundra can handle and what helps.

    Sorry about all of the question, but a newbie to Tundras as my previous truck was too small and wimpy to mention. Been loving the truck, love the ride, and it definitely beat all of the competition!!!

    I hate to tell ya this but your "full size" Double Cab is NOT anywhere close to a typical full size truck when it comes to towing or hauling. Toyota made the Double Cab bigger and a lot (like 500 lbs) heavier than the Access cab models (which aren''t all that great for towing or hauling either) but neither the frame nor rear axle was strengthened. Basically you've got a Tacoma frame and axle under your truck. Which is why your Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR...the most that the truck and all cargo/passengers should ever weigh) is a pretty light 6600 lbs and your Gross Axle Weight Rating (GAWR) for the rear axle is only 3760 lbs.

    A normally optioned and full fluids with 2 pax...but no cargo or backseat passengers...2WD DC will weigh around 5600 lbs and a 4WD DC will weigh around 5800 to 6000 lbs. That means the most a loaded (not empty) truck camper could weigh before exceeding GVWR is only 1000 lbs if you have a 2WD and only 600 lbs if you have 4WD. And even with those light weights, there's a good chance you would be exceeding the GAWR.

    And don't even think about trying to fix the problem by "beefing up" the rear suspension with air bags, overload springs, etc. Sure, you could get the truck off the bump stops but you still haven't fixed the real weaknesses...namely a very light duty frame and light duty rear axle. And in case you don't believe me, take a real long look at this picture of a broken frame on an '03 Tundra where the owner stupidly thought he could carry a mid weight (1500 lbs empty, 2500 lbs loaded) truck camper by just beefing up the suspension with overload springs. And remember this idiot's Access cab had about 500 lbs more available load capacity than your Double Cab.

    Bottom line is you're very likely to either break your frame or rear axle if you try to carry a camper with a dry (empty) weight much over 1000 lbs. That would be a real fast way to turn a $35000 truck into a $3000 piece of salvage...and no, overload damage is not covered under your warranty.
    Ray


    Natural White '03 Access Cab V8 SR5 4X4 with TRD Off Road Suspension, Limited Slip Differential, and Towing Package

    Towing & Performance Mods: JBA Headers, Gibson Muffler, 4.30 gears, Michelin LTX M/S Tires, Hellwig Anti-Roll bar, Prodigy Trailer Brake Controller, Autometer Z-Series Transmission Temperature Gauge, Magnefine Transmission Filter
    Utility & Misc Mods: Genuine Toyota OEM Step (Nerf) bars, Peragon Tonneau Cover, TracRac Rack and Rail System, Muth Signal Mirrors, Pop&Lock tailgate lock, TruSpeed speedometer calibrator, "$20" RS-3200 Upgrade, Auto-Dimming mirror w/ Temp and Compass, Clear/Red/Clear Taillights with Silverstar Signal bulbs, 3M Clear Bra


  8. #7
    Rookie
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    4
    Liked
    1 times
    Rep Power
    0
    Thread Starter

    Default Differences between extcab and DC

    Quote Originally Posted by RockyMtnRay
    I hate to tell ya this but your "full size" Double Cab is NOT anywhere close to a typical full size truck when it comes to towing or hauling. Toyota made the Double Cab bigger and a lot (like 500 lbs) heavier than the Access cab models (which aren''t all that great for towing or hauling either) but neither the frame nor rear axle was strengthened. Basically you've got a Tacoma frame and axle under your truck. Which is why your Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR...the most that the truck and all cargo/passengers should ever weigh) is a pretty light 6600 lbs and your Gross Axle Weight Rating (GAWR) for the rear axle is only 3760 lbs.

    A normally optioned and full fluids with 2 pax...but no cargo or backseat passengers...2WD DC will weigh around 5600 lbs and a 4WD DC will weigh around 5800 to 6000 lbs. That means the most a loaded (not empty) truck camper could weigh before exceeding GVWR is only 1000 lbs if you have a 2WD and only 600 lbs if you have 4WD. And even with those light weights, there's a good chance you would be exceeding the GAWR.

    And don't even think about trying to fix the problem by "beefing up" the rear suspension with air bags, overload springs, etc. Sure, you could get the truck off the bump stops but you still haven't fixed the real weaknesses...namely a very light duty frame and light duty rear axle. And in case you don't believe me, take a real long look at this picture of a broken frame on an '03 Tundra where the owner stupidly thought he could carry a mid weight (1500 lbs empty, 2500 lbs loaded) truck camper by just beefing up the suspension with overload springs. And remember this idiot's Access cab had about 500 lbs more available load capacity than your Double Cab.

    Bottom line is you're very likely to either break your frame or rear axle if you try to carry a camper with a dry (empty) weight much over 1000 lbs. That would be a real fast way to turn a $35000 truck into a $3000 piece of salvage...and no, overload damage is not covered under your warranty.
    Ray-

    I have read your posts and all I can say is you definatly know more about this stuff than I do!!! I find your post well grounded in fact and generally lacking bias and pointed toward the “face the ugly truth” point of view. But after I read your post, I have to admit you scared the S&*$ out of me. I found my self-asking “what kind of wimpy truck” did I purchase. Anyhow, the questions I had were around your reference to a 2003 EXCAB vs a 2005 DC. Based on other posts, I understood that the DC was redesigned with a new frame and other components. Is it fair to compare 2003 ext cab to a DC? I understand your point on the axel, but I was also under the impression that the DC was 4” wider with an “All new Frame”, so wasn’t a new axle and frame required? I read somewhere in the forum that the DC had an all new frame, is this not the case? If not where did the 4” come from? I compared many of the ½ ton trucks against each other and found that the Tundra DC compared to similar DC or ext cab models actually had a higher Payload Cap than many of the competitors (Toyota= 1630lbs, Ford F150=1530lbs, Nissan Titan=1530lbs, Chevy Silverado 1500 = 1392lbs); admittedly it did have a significantly less towing capacity (Still more thsan the Ford). What is the biggest restriction in payload capacity? I think I have seen in your other posts where you address the towing capacity issue by stating brakes, engine, and transmission are the limiting factors. Is Payload limited initially by the frame and suspension only? What goes into this rating. I have read post stating it had to do with the belt driven OHC engine design, where the competitors have stuck with a old style push rod design, any facts on that?


    My thought is that you could probably find a truck that never hauled much of anything with a broken frame, if abused you could break a Sherman tank if you set your mind to it.

    I recognize that the best option for most all TCs is a ¾ ton truck. In my case, I will be lucky to get 3 months out of the year using the camper on weekends. With this in mind I found the Tundra the best truck to meet the needs of the other 9 months.

    My apologies on all of the questions, and appreciate all of the info and feed back.

    DK

  9. #8
    Supporter RockyMtnRay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Posts
    1,231
    Liked
    0 times
    Rep Power
    13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dkocol
    Ray-

    I have read your posts and all I can say is you definatly know more about this stuff than I do!!! I find your post well grounded in fact and generally lacking bias and pointed toward the “face the ugly truth” point of view. But after I read your post, I have to admit you scared the S&*$ out of me. I found my self-asking “what kind of wimpy truck” did I purchase. Anyhow, the questions I had were around your reference to a 2003 EXCAB vs a 2005 DC. Based on other posts, I understood that the DC was redesigned with a new frame and other components. Is it fair to compare 2003 ext cab to a DC? I understand your point on the axel, but I was also under the impression that the DC was 4” wider with an “All new Frame”, so wasn’t a new axle and frame required? I read somewhere in the forum that the DC had an all new frame, is this not the case? If not where did the 4” come from? I compared many of the ½ ton trucks against each other and found that the Tundra DC compared to similar DC or ext cab models actually had a higher Payload Cap than many of the competitors (Toyota= 1630lbs, Ford F150=1530lbs, Nissan Titan=1530lbs, Chevy Silverado 1500 = 1392lbs); admittedly it did have a significantly less towing capacity (Still more thsan the Ford). What is the biggest restriction in payload capacity? I think I have seen in your other posts where you address the towing capacity issue by stating brakes, engine, and transmission are the limiting factors. Is Payload limited initially by the frame and suspension only? What goes into this rating. I have read post stating it had to do with the belt driven OHC engine design, where the competitors have stuck with a old style push rod design, any facts on that?


    My thought is that you could probably find a truck that never hauled much of anything with a broken frame, if abused you could break a Sherman tank if you set your mind to it.

    I recognize that the best option for most all TCs is a ¾ ton truck. In my case, I will be lucky to get 3 months out of the year using the camper on weekends. With this in mind I found the Tundra the best truck to meet the needs of the other 9 months.

    My apologies on all of the questions, and appreciate all of the info and feed back.

    DK
    So many questions. Not sure I can answer all of them but I'll try. First, "Payload Capacity" is simply the difference between "empty" or "curb" weight and the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR)...on a DC the GVWR is 6600 lbs (400 more than an Access Cab) and the curb weight is 4970 lbs (200 more than an Access Cab). A lower "payload capacity" sometimes means the empty truck is heavier (greater empty or curb weight), sometimes it means the truck isn't as strong (lower GVWR). Furthermore, since payload capacity is the difference between GVWR and empty weight, it also includes all load you put in the cab (particularly passengers) and not just the load you put in the bed (like a camper).

    I'm not sure where you got payload capacities for some of the vehicles you listed...I found that a standard Silverado 1500 (not the HD model) has payload capacities that range from a low of 1200 lbs to a high of 2040 lbs...and GVWRs that range from 6100 to 7000 lbs...depending on what combination of cab, box, and drivetrain was chosen. So, while it's true that the Tundra has a better payload than some versions of the half-ton domestic competition, there are other versions of the competition that have much better payload.

    As for the "all new frame" on the DC (compared to the AC)...yes, it's a larger frame but not necessarily a much stronger frame. It's still a C-section frame (not boxed) for one thing. The indicator I watch is how much difference is there in the GVWR versus the curb or empty weight of the two trucks. The DC has a 400 lb higher GVWR but also at least a 200 lb higher official curb weight. Perhaps Toyota did increase the frame strength on the DC but the increase was mighty small if they did. And the additional wheelbase definitely puts more demand on the frame. I'm not particularly impressed and would suggest that you not assume the growth to a "full size" truck was matched by a big growth in frame strength. Same thing with the axle...sure it's wider but does that mean it's heavier duty. I kinda think not since the differential (at least on the '04 DC) is the same 4.10 unit they used on the Tacomas.

    Payload capacity is the composite of many factors, chiefly frame, suspension, and axle. But drivetrain and torque figure in as well...manufacturers often increase the GVWR when they increase the engine power and or axle ratios. Futhermore, the smart manufacturers (particularly Toyota) carefully match the strength (read cost) of these components...it's not cost effective to spend the money to design/build a heavy duty frame and then use a light duty axle.

    Towing capacity is a function of frame, suspension, axle, differentials, rear axle, rear suspension, engine, transmission, brakes...basically everything. And towing capacity, in a similar manner to payload capacity, is nothing more than the difference between the GCWR (gross combined weight rating) and curb weight. Sure, rear wheel torque is a big factor (a function of engine/transmission/differential) but like payload, the GCWR is really the sum of all the parts...and frame/rear axle/suspension strength are also very important parts.

    IMHO, it's extremely important to note that the Double Cab and Access Cab Tundras have exactly the same GCWR....11,800 lbs. If the DC were substantially stronger (frame/axle/suspension) than the AC, I would have expected to have seen the same 400 lb increase in GCWR between the two models that exists for the GVWR. But since the GCWR of the DC is not higher than the AC...even though the truck is larger and heavier...I have a strong suspicion that the increase in the DC's GVWR was driven more by marketing needs ("we can't have a lower published payload on the bigger truck!") than by a true increase in truck strength.

    As for differences in towing related to engine design, I don't think that the torque component of towing capacity is a function of engine type per se...it's really a matter of the shape of the engine's torque curve and Toyota has tuned the 4.7 to produce a torque curve that works well for towing.

    Is the Tundra DC "wimpy"? No, but the GVWR, GCWR, and GAWR (Gross Axle Weight Rating)-rear numbers ....and facts like the common differential...strongly suggest to me that the DC is nothing more than a slightly upsized AC and not a true full-sized truck with an "all new" frame and axle. Hopefully the forthcoming redesigned Tundras ('06? '07?) will be truly "full sized" with a genuinely heavy duty frame, suspension, and axle.

    In the meantime, I would suggest that DC owners pay pretty close attention to the GVWR and GAWR numbers and not try to overload their trucks beyond the relatively low weight ratings that the Toyota engineers have specified. Because I feel strongly that the DC is one vehicle where Toyota was not being overly conservative.

    And if you are going to regularly stress with the truck with a camper, then you'd be very, very wise to load the truck with camper, cargo, and people just as you would for a camping trip and then make your first stop a set of truck scales. If the truck's total weight is less than the GVWR (6600 lbs) and the weight on the rear axle is less than the GAWR (3970 lbs), then you are within the specs and should not have any problems. But if your weights exceed either of these ratings by more than a couple of hundred pounds, then you are definitely overloaded and do have much to worry about. Bottom line: get the truck weighed ASAP when it's loaded with a realistic load.
    Ray


    Natural White '03 Access Cab V8 SR5 4X4 with TRD Off Road Suspension, Limited Slip Differential, and Towing Package

    Towing & Performance Mods: JBA Headers, Gibson Muffler, 4.30 gears, Michelin LTX M/S Tires, Hellwig Anti-Roll bar, Prodigy Trailer Brake Controller, Autometer Z-Series Transmission Temperature Gauge, Magnefine Transmission Filter
    Utility & Misc Mods: Genuine Toyota OEM Step (Nerf) bars, Peragon Tonneau Cover, TracRac Rack and Rail System, Muth Signal Mirrors, Pop&Lock tailgate lock, TruSpeed speedometer calibrator, "$20" RS-3200 Upgrade, Auto-Dimming mirror w/ Temp and Compass, Clear/Red/Clear Taillights with Silverstar Signal bulbs, 3M Clear Bra


  10. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Sandpoint, ID
    Posts
    99
    Liked
    0 times
    Rep Power
    13

    Default

    dkocol,

    Been there, done that. I have had a '01 Access cab and now a '03 Access cab.

    I went with a smaller camper made for small imports (Frontiers, Tacoma's, etc). Even at 1,200 lbs with air bags and a rear anti-sway bar I was not convinced this would work. The other factor is how much weight (and surface area) is above the truck bed itself.

    In my opinion the max a Tundra can haul realisitically is a pop-up. Four Wheel makes the lightest I know of but Outfitter makes a nice one. It pushes the limits weight wise when loaded but it has a low center of gravity. Anything over a 1,000 lbs will be way overloaded when you add passengers and 'stuff'. Even though you will only use it a few weekends a year it still might concern you.

    One final thought is to go to the folks who do this all the time. http://www.Woodalls.com has a forum site devoted to truck camper owners, some of which are Tundra owners.

    Joe

  11. #10
    Rookie Hairwing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Eatonville, WA near Mt. Rainier
    Posts
    11
    Liked
    0 times
    Rep Power
    0

    Default the max a Tundra can haul realisitically is a pop-up.

    Check out the 6.5 Caribou slide-in, pop-up camper from Outfitters. It weights 850 lbs. Picture of a Caribou 6.5 on a Tundra from their website www.outfittermfg.com
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	tundra camper.jpg 
Views:	27933 
Size:	44.6 KB 
ID:	8987  

  12. #11
    Lurking Member fasbird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Pocatello country, ID
    Age
    65
    Posts
    27
    Liked
    0 times
    Rep Power
    10

    Default Re: Toyota Tundra and Slide in Truck Campers

    That 6.5 ft Caribou looks pretty good and is the only one I have seen that comes close to fitting the Tundra. I tried a 6.5 Bronco pop top on my 05 Access and all I can say is that I should have bought more camper, should have bought more truck and should have never used the silly happyjacks. Tundra cabs have a much lower roof line than, say, an F-150. Which means it sits up much high in the wind; boy does it ever. And sits up much higher than other centers of gravity, boy does it ever. Sways and wiggles and jumps around with terrible gas mileage if the wind was against me. Suspension much to light to handle the weight shifts. The happyjacks keep the camper on, but dont stop it from pressing against the front of the bed... and bending the hell out of it. The four wheel campers attach through the floor to the bed of the truck and look much more practical. Course a nice one costs like $10K plus and still does not sit down close to the cab roof.

    Anyway, loved the truck, sold it and bought a RAV4 and now shopping for a small motor home. My solution, not perfect, but better than constant pucker.
    Luck, JMark

  13. #12
    Rookie
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    1
    Liked
    0 times
    Rep Power
    0

    Default Re: Toyota Tundra and Slide in Truck Campers

    There is another option for the Tundra.

    All Terrain Campers

    They build a camper specifically for the Tundra and also for the new Tundra that is coming out.

    Ben

  14. #13
    Rookie
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Spirit Lake Idaho
    Posts
    16
    Liked
    0 times
    Rep Power
    0

    Wink Re: Using a truck camper is a very BAD idea with a Double Cab

    [This may be true according to the specs. But I think you are underestimating the strength of a toyota frame and its axles. Let me give you an example. There is a lady from New England who carried a lance
    815 camper extended that had all the ameniities and the dry weight was 1775 lbs. With all the gear and water, propane, etc. I am sure it weighed in at over 2300 lbs. SHe traveled all over the country including the Alaska highway on stock tires (standard toyota tires) Thousands of miles. It was on a 2006 double cab 4wd tundra! Way over the rear axle and gross vehicle
    weight. Maybe the lord was on her side. Or maybe ignorance is bliss!!!

  15. #14
    Rookie
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    los angeles, Ca
    Posts
    6
    Liked
    0 times
    Rep Power
    0

    Default Re: Toyota Tundra and Slide in Truck Campers

    I considered the payload capacity to be how much weight I could consider to choosing a camper.
    I spoke to an employee at an RV dealership in Baldwin Park, Ca and they sell Northstar and Lance.

    He told me that payload is not how to determine the weight of the camper that could fit.
    Rather, you need to take the gross front axle weight and gross rear axle weight and add them together. Then subtract the curb weight of the vehicle.

    That figure represents the weight of the camper plus gear that you want to haul. Supposedly, this is because the weight is distributed over the entire truck, and not just in the bed.

    In addition, for each seat belt, Toyota factors in a 150 lbs person. So, an Access Cab will have 600 lbs and if you are just traveling with 1 person at a combined weight of 300 lbs, then you have another 300 lbs to apply to the camper.

    I understand that these guys might come up with their own numbers to sell me a camper, but do these calculations make sense?

  16. #15
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    portsmouth
    Posts
    54
    Liked
    0 times
    Rep Power
    7

    Default Re: Toyota Tundra and Slide in Truck Campers

    I just got back from talking to the co-owner of the largest truck camper dealership on the northeast. He has been selling only truck campers for more than 20 years here in New Hampshire. I was assured that the tundra, when properly equipped with air bags and light truck tires, can handle the lance 815 camper that weighs basically 1,800 lbs. dry. He has been putting them on tundras and has yet to see any issues with it - except that the superspring brand helpers do not work with this type of heavy load and are being swapped out by tundra owners for air bags. Supersprings bottom out on tundras carrying campers, he said, and offered to sell me one of the four used sets had. Instead he recommended firestone air bags as well as torklift tie downs.

    To double check the info, I went to talk to my friend who is a service manager at a toyo dealership and has done lots of off-road mods to his 08 tundra. he said yes you'll be over the rating, but there should not be any problem with it as long as i add the air bags and beef up the tires. In addition, i have the trd package with gives me stiffer shock and beefier coils as well as the tow package that gives me the bigger 10.5 differiential (the same size ford f150 get for their increased payload package)...

    Anyway, I'm going ahead convinced that I will have the same luck with the tundra as I did with my 97 tacoma which I drove more than 10 years over thousands of miles carrying a slide in camper with a dry weight of 1,400 lbs... loaded with fuilds and cargo I am sure I was in the 1,800 lb range... and I took it mostly off-road through really rough areas for camping.

    So bean counters we'll find out if this combo works as well on the tundra as it did on the tacoma.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Driveline vibration.
    By nhparrot in forum T-Case, Driveshaft, Diff, Axle, Hub
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 03-05-2014, 03:30 AM
  2. Which BRAND of OIL?
    By nhparrot in forum Engine, Intake, Exhaust, Induction
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 10-29-2007, 10:43 AM
  3. The shift lever
    By nhparrot in forum Interior & Exterior
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-11-2005, 07:45 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •