Do Lifted Trucks have more problems in General?

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Thread: Do Lifted Trucks have more problems in General?

  1. #1
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    Default Do Lifted Trucks have more problems in General?

    I do not have a Tundra yet, but am researching heavily because I want one. One of the first things I want to do is put bigger tires on with new wheels which would require a lift. I have read that several people have problems with CV boots/joints, upper control arms/joints. Is this just Tundra related or do other truck manufacturers have similar problems due to the nature of the added stress lifting has on a truck?

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    SAS'ed #5 dyogim's Avatar
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    I would say in general, a lift is going to cause extra stress/more-wear-and-tear on the stock components.

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    DJ
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    It will put more stress on the drive train, the brakes, and the suspension joints. It's easy to understand why.

    With bigger diameter tires, it takes greater torque at the wheels to generate the same acceleration. Unless you drive more gently with a lifted truck than with a stock truck, you will have more stress on the axles, CV joints, differential, u-joints, transmission, torque converter, and engine. If you change the axle gear ratio, you can end up with no change in the stress on the u-joints, transmission, torque converter, and engine, but this won't have any effect on the axles and CV joints.

    With bigger diameter tires, it takes greater torque at the wheels to generate the same deceleration. The brakes have to absorb the same amount of energy, but they have to use higher hydraulic pressure and greater force of the pads against the disks and shoes against the drums to do so. This means the maximum braking force possible is reduced.

    With bigger diameter tires, the center of mass is higher off the ground. With a lift, it's higher still. This means that a greater percentage of the braking is performed by the front brakes as compared to the rear brakes, because the higher center of mass means a greater transfer of weight to the front wheels during braking. This reduces steering stability during braking and increases the tendency of the rear wheels to break loose.

    With bigger diameter tires, there is greater stress on the ball joints during cornering. The centrifugal force of cornering causes the tires to exert a bending moment on the ball joints. That bending moment is higher if the diameter of the tires is higher. The same is true for the pivot joints of the upper and lower control arm.

    There are good reasons why race cars are low to the ground. Everyone obeys the laws of physics. The point is that the price of lifting a truck and putting on big tires is greater than the money that comes out of your wallet.

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    Leader of Group Evil DevinSixtySeven's Avatar
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    that write-up went straight to the offroad faq .

    also, dont forget the effort the power steering system must exert to break loose a larger contact patch, stress on the tie rods, and misalignment of the steering rack in the mounting bushings.

    -s

    GFX by FreedomEagle50
    1-Gen Tundra Offroad Technical FAQ Index
    Armor - Lift vs. Travel - Traction - Tire Fitment - Recovery - Lift Kits - Driving - Tires & Gears - CV Boot Mod
    Manual Hubs
    OB's cup size: 36DD

    "some people will call you stupid but its worth a try because i know i also want one more inch."--SouthernTundraSC


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    Supporter Agent WD-40's Avatar
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    I would also think you would be more likely to roll over a guard rail on the road that be held in the lane by it. Most of those guard rails were designed for cars anyhow, not trucks, let alone lifted ones.


    "You play the hand you're dealt. I think the game's worthwhile." -C. S. Lewis

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    mandzach mandzach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJ
    There are good reasons why race cars are low to the ground. Everyone obeys the laws of physics. The point is that the price of lifting a truck and putting on big tires is greater than the money that comes out of your wallet.
    You had a great post going there DJ untill this comment using the race car analogy IMHO.

    There are good reasons why race cars are low to the ground ,agreed but ....
    The race car will never be able to crawl,drive,jump over a 6" curb or rock or travel through deep mud or over downed trees and stumps.
    A 4x4 truck lifted slightly to fit larger tires is at times a need and not a want.
    A truck is designed to travel off road or at the very least through a unpaved work site.
    The only reason to lift a truck and mount larger tires is to gain ground clearance plain and simple (good looks is a lame excuse to lift imo like DJ stated to many issues associated)-your points are all valid although i belive every one of your points pertaining to added stress can be corrected with proper upgraded parts-i understand you know this but some members may not and i didnt want some novice reading this thread to end up being scared off from raising his truck if they need more clearance or more tread for serious off road applications.
    I owned an excavation company some years back and really needed more ground clearance than any 4x4 was offering in stock form so i needed to lift my work truck and mount larger tires on it or else my excavator would have not been able to get its 80 gallons of fuel it used everday. Just my 2 cents
    07' DC 4x4 TRD Tacoma - 11Pk Custom Deavers / 3* shims - TC UCA's - DR 2.5 CO's - DR RR Rear Shocks - Light Racing Jounce Stops F&R - 285/75 16 GY MT/R Kevlar - AllPro F Bumper, Slidders & IFS Skid - Warn M8000 w/3/8" Technora - Piaa 510 Fogs - Hella 4000FF w/55w HID - Icom 208H/SG7500A - Midland 1001Z/Little Wil - PAP112/SA315P - EGHST1P dust light - Blue Sea fuse blocks cab/eng bay - DH G31 PM-1 Platinum - OTRATTW switches - 20lb Co2.
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    dunno that it was such a bad analogy actually...designers of rock buggies and desert trucks go out of their way to minimize lift; the trucks are designed to fit a large tire, but their c.g. is kept as low as possible for the same reason f1 cars are low to the ground. a lot of people who lift their trucks don't consider this. the first article i ever found regarding tubbing was a guy with an older toy that had a suspension lift and a body lift...he wanted to ditch the body lift for some of the reasons dj posted, hence the tub job to fit a larger tire without having to add static height to the truck.

    -s

    GFX by FreedomEagle50
    1-Gen Tundra Offroad Technical FAQ Index
    Armor - Lift vs. Travel - Traction - Tire Fitment - Recovery - Lift Kits - Driving - Tires & Gears - CV Boot Mod
    Manual Hubs
    OB's cup size: 36DD

    "some people will call you stupid but its worth a try because i know i also want one more inch."--SouthernTundraSC


  9. #8
    mandzach mandzach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DevinSixtySeven
    dunno that it was such a bad analogy actually...designers of rock buggies and desert trucks go out of their way to minimize lift; the trucks are designed to fit a large tire, but their c.g. is kept as low as possible for the same reason f1 cars are low to the ground. a lot of people who lift their trucks don't consider this. the first article i ever found regarding tubbing was a guy with an older toy that had a suspension lift and a body lift...he wanted to ditch the body lift for some of the reasons dj posted, hence the tub job to fit a larger tire without having to add static height to the truck.

    -s
    Yes -we are talking about the same issues here - and although what you are saying is true about the off road scene it is not so for a road/work truck because who wants to cut sheet metal to uptain 1-4" more ground clearance, the fenders cut out would seriously kill the resale of any vehicle and produce added cost.
    Rock crawlers need the larger tires for grip and ground clearence but like you stated cant afford for to high a center of gravity -therefor they have moved to tube setups like the monster trucks and off road race trucks utilize to uptain lower drivetrain and engine setups and longer travel while still retaining clearance.
    Of course keeping the weight low is a consideration but if you go up in height by 3"(overall vehicle height) and you go out in width (tire width) by 1.5" on each side than is the lifted vehicle any less stable given the alignment is correct?
    Larger tires and wheels also weigh more and take more force to lift off the ground when considering rollover possibility. Thats a counter weight to the rest of the raised vehicle imho.
    07' DC 4x4 TRD Tacoma - 11Pk Custom Deavers / 3* shims - TC UCA's - DR 2.5 CO's - DR RR Rear Shocks - Light Racing Jounce Stops F&R - 285/75 16 GY MT/R Kevlar - AllPro F Bumper, Slidders & IFS Skid - Warn M8000 w/3/8" Technora - Piaa 510 Fogs - Hella 4000FF w/55w HID - Icom 208H/SG7500A - Midland 1001Z/Little Wil - PAP112/SA315P - EGHST1P dust light - Blue Sea fuse blocks cab/eng bay - DH G31 PM-1 Platinum - OTRATTW switches - 20lb Co2.
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  10. #9
    DJ
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    Quote Originally Posted by mandzach
    You had a great post going there DJ untill this comment using the race car analogy IMHO.

    ...
    My comments were directed to the physics of using larger tires and lifting the vehicle, and to the effects these modifications have on stresses in the vehicle. I think the race car analogy is quite appropriate. I included it to help people visualize the geometry involved, and to point out that, if race car designers go to such great lengths to lower the CG of the vehicle, there must be good reasons why.

    The "strains" that result from those "stresses" can be reduced by using stronger parts, but the stresses are there nonetheless. Race cars obey the laws of physics, too, and they make their CG as low as possible precisely to reduce the resulting stresses and strains, thereby allowing them to make the parts as light as possible.

    Lots of people use larger tires and/or lift their vehicles and they sometimes have valid reasons other than "looks" for doing so. My comments were that such modifications have "hidden costs", the point being that people who make such modifications should be aware of those costs.

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