Question What can a 5.7L comfortably tow? [Archive] - Toyota Tundra Forums : Tundra Solutions Forum

: Question What can a 5.7L comfortably tow?



Toyota Tundra
10-31-2010, 07:17 AM
I currently have a 2002 4.7L tundra and it has been a very good truck to me, but I do quite a bit of towing and I have been wanting a new truck. I know Toyota says the 5.7 is rated at 10,000lbs but I question how well it tows that much weight, because I believe my tundra is rated about 6-7000lbs but it struggles quite a bit even towing 4000lbs. I guess I'm just trying to figure out if the newer tundras are really that much better or if maybe I should consider getting a diesel? I've also read that there is a supercharger for the 5.7, anybody done any towing with a SC? Any comments are appreciated.

ogtoyfan
10-31-2010, 08:29 AM
Actually the 2011 has a lower rating. Something about Toyota actually being the first manufacture to calculate actual tow rating based upon vehicle weight rating. It all depends on what you tow and how often you tow it. I have continually upgraded my trucks over the years. granted I do not tow that much or that often but the 5.7 has everything beat so far short of the diesel I owned.

cdadler
10-31-2010, 08:52 AM
I have the 5.7 and it tows my 5000lb travel trailer with no problem. I can comfortably roll down the interstate. My last truck... Not so easy.

Tundra951
10-31-2010, 09:25 AM
There is no comparsion between the two. I had a 2002 4.7 TRD access cab with a K&N, magnaflow cat-back, air bags. I've replaced the 02 with a 2007 5.7 crew max and we tow a Jayco travel trailer weighing in a 6800 lbs. dry. I've towed it with the 2002, basically a white knuckle ride when fully-loaded with family of 5, gear, fuel, camping gear, etc. Its a good thing we did just local runs with it. The truck would stuggle in all aspects of towing the trailer, the brakes would heat up significantly during stop and go city driving, trailer sway pushing the truck around like a toy. On the other hand, the 5.7 tows it no problem. Superior braking and acceleration, can easily pass slower vehicles, less affected by trailer sway, much safer for the family and peace of mind.

tomhole
10-31-2010, 09:32 AM
I had a 2005 Tundra that I used to tow my current 33 ft, 6,200 lbs trailer. Underpowered, but enough to get the job done. I bent the receiver with too much hitch weight. Never felt I was in control of the rig. I added airbags, D rated LT tires and weighed the rig every time I towed. It could tow it, but it was max'd out from a performance and safety standpoint. I mitigated the risk with slow driving and short trips. I would not have towed this combo on a regular basis.

I upgraded to a 2008 Tundra 5.7 DC and I'm still pulling the same trailer. So, I think I have a good comparison between a 2005 4.7L and a 2008 5.7L. The underpowered problem immediately went away. That drivetrain is as good as any gasser. My lusting for an oil burner has gone away. But that was only part of the equation. The jury is still out on the suspension. I have the same airbags but haven't gone to LT tires yet. Nor have I max'd out the truck. I want it to be better, I think it's better, I just don't have any data or experience to know.

Bottom line: drivetrain is a huge improvement. Suspension: it's no worse, probably better. Worth the upgrade, IMHO.

Tom

cmb
10-31-2010, 09:42 AM
We tow about 1000 miles a year. Weight is 4-4500 lbs or so.My 2010 DC 5.7 pulls AND STOPS the load as well as I could've hoped for. Mileage goes from 17-17.5 to 10-12.

Toyota Tundra
10-31-2010, 05:34 PM
Well it sounds like the 5.7 is definitely a solid powerplant. I was wanting a cummins for a little while but the only thing stopping me was wether or not and auto tranny from dodge would hold up to the test of time. After owning my tundra I didn't have any concern as to the tranny behind the 5.7. As far as the suspension goes on the newer tundras, I kinda figured it would suck almost as bad as the first gen, but airbags are a quick affordable fix. Any thoughts on a supercharger? I was curious if it would be worth it? Would it possibly shorten the life of the truck?

Floorman
11-18-2010, 05:06 PM
Not comfortably a 7600lb cargo trailer. Love my Tundra, but upgrades are definitely necessary for towing some weight. I have upgraded my stock PASSENGER tires to LT. Added a weight distribution hitch. And my airbags just arrived on the front porch today for my rear-end. After I install those? That is another thread. Supercharger is on the list. Definitely.

jdubh
11-21-2010, 07:21 PM
Not comfortably a 7600lb cargo trailer. Love my Tundra, but upgrades are definitely necessary for towing some weight. I have upgraded my stock PASSENGER tires to LT. Added a weight distribution hitch. And my airbags just arrived on the front porch today for my rear-end. After I install those? That is another thread. Supercharger is on the list. Definitely.

Says right on the hitch not to tow above 5000 without a WDH...said the same thing on my 2500 GMC. You should have taken the tires to E instead of LT. You still get some side to side motion with E, but not as much as with LT.

tomhole
11-21-2010, 07:48 PM
E rated tires are LT tires. So are C & D rated tires. AFIK.

TRDSport
11-21-2010, 10:14 PM
Just borrowed my friend's 30', 6000lbs TT and took it up to Sedona for a long weekend getaway. For those not familiar with the area, going north out of Phoenix there are some 6% and 7% grades that we had to climb. The truck did very well and motored up the climbs at about 60-65mph in 3rd gear at almost 4000rpm. Mileage sucked at about 7mpg during the climbing, but got about 10mpg overall. I am very happy with the truck.

jdubh
11-22-2010, 01:01 AM
E rated tires are LT tires. So are C & D rated tires. AFIK.

My mistake, I thought LT was only C. But he didn't say if the LT's he purchased were 10-ply or not.

Gritty
11-22-2010, 08:43 AM
Regarding load ratings and ply (http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=55) ...


The load range or ply rating branded on a tire's sidewall helps identify how much load the tire is designed to carry at its industry specified pressure. Passenger tires feature named load ranges while light truck tires use load ranges that ascend in alphabetical order (letters further along in the alphabet identify stronger tires that can withstand higher inflation pressures and carry heavier loads). Before load ranges were adopted, ply ratings and/or the actual number of carcass plies were used to identify the relative strength with higher numeric ratings or plies identifying tires featuring stronger, heavier duty constructions.

Today's load range/ply ratings do not count the actual number of body ply layers used to make up the tire's internal structure, but indicate an equivalent strength compared to early bias ply tires. Most radial passenger tires have one or two body plies, and light truck tires, even those with heavy-duty ratings (10-, 12- or 14-ply rated), actually have only two or three fabric plies, or one steel body ply.

headleyj
07-12-2011, 09:47 AM
my 2008 DC 5.7 4x4 can tow 10k. E rated tires and airbags. I'd say it's VERY good at towing that weight. I'd call it comfortable, the tow/ haul mode in "D" uses the engine to help you downshift/ engine brake. It's wicked good for a half ton.

Flyguy108
07-30-2011, 07:04 AM
Well it sounds like the 5.7 is definitely a solid powerplant. I was wanting a cummins for a little while but the only thing stopping me was wether or not and auto tranny from dodge would hold up to the test of time. After owning my tundra I didn't have any concern as to the tranny behind the 5.7. As far as the suspension goes on the newer tundras, I kinda figured it would suck almost as bad as the first gen, but airbags are a quick affordable fix. Any thoughts on a supercharger? I was curious if it would be worth it? Would it possibly shorten the life of the truck?

I put a supercharger on the Tacoma I once had and the increase in performance was great! Only thing is that now you have to use Premium fuel at an increase cost. I'm sure that the 5.7 would benifit from the supercharger but I don't want to go back to premium fuel, besides the 5.7 has all the power that I need without it.

As far as how much weight the 5.7 can comfortably tow, I like to keep the towing weight to the 80% mark max so for me that's about 8300lbs (I take the empty weight of the trailer and add 1100lbs to ballpark the tow weight), I never tow with any liquids in the holding tanks except for about 6 gals in the fresh tank and a charge in the potty so we can use it on the road. Works for me!