Question Front brakes will not stop squeaking... [Archive] - Toyota Tundra Forums : Tundra Solutions Forum

: Question Front brakes will not stop squeaking...



bstaneland
01-18-2012, 06:08 PM
EDIT: If you are reading this for the first time please note that, although there are helpful posts in this thread from Tundra Solutions members regarding front brake troubleshooting, ultimately the problem brought up turned out to be with the REAR disc brakes (more specifically the brake hardware). If a REAR brake issue is what you are having then I strongly recommend you skip to post #13 in this thread for a possible solution. Regards...
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First I think it is important to point out that the rotors, pads and hardware all have less than 12000 miles on them (i.e. tons of life left).

As the front rotors spin while driving, one or more pads rub against the rotor in a certain spot causing the squeak. In other words, the faster I drive the faster the squeaking. As soon as I apply any brake pressure the squeak stops. So obviously the rotors aren't perfectly true, big deal, what Toyota SUV rotors are? If it wasn't for the squeak I'd have no complaints because there is zero shake or shimmy while braking.

So anyway, I have been troubleshooting trying to stop the squeaking....

Removed the pads and applied the red anti-squeal goo.
Removed the pads and applied anti-seize lubricant to all parts that the pads and brake hardware touch that could be vibration causing <--tip from my neighbor.
Removed only the behind set of brake hardware "paper clips".
Removed both sets of brake hardware "paper clips".
Reinstalled the "paper clips".

Nothing changes. Still get the squeak.

Before I go out and just buy a new set of pads that are labeled as "quiet", possibly wasting money thinking it is the brake pad material, does anyone have any suggestions? :confused:

czechm8
01-19-2012, 06:34 AM
Could be a bad caliper dragging on the rotor.

bstaneland
01-19-2012, 08:09 AM
When you say a bad caliper, do you mean that one (or more) of the pistons sticks in the "out" position and is pressing the pad onto the rotor?

A few months ago I was having an issue where when I would drive the truck in reverse after being parked for a while (like overnight) I could feel sort of like a dragging. So I did a caliper rebuild on both front calipers. I didn't replace the pistons because they were not scarred and not discolored, but I did replace the seals/boots. It was a pretty easy job that I thought I did correctly because of both the ease of the job and the fact that the dragging in reverse thing stopped happening.

Now knowing the above (I should have included that info in my initial post), and assuming I understand your suggestion correctly, do you think the caliper dragging could still be the culprit?

dBtoyz
01-19-2012, 12:47 PM
From my experience, there are maybe three sources for this annoyance. The first part I'm sure you have already seen several time... the squeak metal attached to the pads. This makes a racket when the pads are very low and metal is contacting rotor metal.

The second spot to check is the metal dust shield on the back of the rotors. This is pretty flimsy and can
deform rubbing against the rotor. This sound is not a squeak but more like lite metal scratching. Just stick you head inside and make sure the shield is clear of the rotor as you spin the tire.

The third point"s" are the brake parts. The brake grease should be applied where the caliper and the piston hits the back of the pad contact shield at all 3 points (by the way, there should be a small shield stuck on the back of each pad to set the pad width to correct distance from the rotor... "shim"). With the pads out of the caliper, the top and bottom of the pads have a square metal tab which rides inside a slick metal clip in the caliper. Take these clips out one at a time, clean off as shiny as possible and put very light film of brake grease in these clips before reinstalling into the caliper. Lite brake grease on the pad's metal tabs which slide inside these clips. The two pins which you removed to take the pads out, on the top and bottom of the caliper sit inside a rubber tube. Remove the pins from the tub, clean them up and put new grease on the pins before inserting into the tube.

If you no longer see the slits in the brake pads, it time to change. The best pads I found for my 03 are the heavy duty EBCs.

Don't forget to check the back brake pads also.

remove finger prints and wayward grease spots from the rotor before mounting tire. I use a full can of brake cleaner for 2 brakes.

bstaneland
01-20-2012, 01:28 PM
The two pins which you removed to take the pads out, on the top and bottom of the caliper sit inside a rubber tube. Remove the pins from the tub, clean them up and put new grease on the pins before inserting into the tube.

Thanks for all the info. Everything you mention has been done, except the part I saved in the quote...

I just looked at a picture of the hardware kit on a parts website and sure enough it looks like the pins are wearing tubes. As it turns out there are two types of brake hardware for the front... one that is just the paper clip pieces and one that also includes the slide pins (& tubes). The brake hardware kit I bought did not include the pins which would explain why I didn't have any tubes to slide on the pins. I don't remember if there were tubes when I removed the old pads.

I am just about convinced that the squeaking is from vibration, likely these slide pins, and I was thinking of wrapping the slide pins in something to act like a vibration insulator. It's interesting you mention these tubes, because if I am understanding correctly then that is what is probably the issue.

Going to drive to my local auto parts store to take a hands-on look at the slide pin tubes and if it is what I am imagining my squeaking is about to be over.

Thanks brother!!!

I'll report back with my findings in case others have the same issue...

bgrib75
01-20-2012, 03:51 PM
Please report back, I am having the same issue. I have owned the Sequoia for about 4 months now and I haven't been able to figure it out but it drives me crazy.

bstaneland
01-21-2012, 07:08 AM
OK, I was really excited yesterday after leaving this forum. But right now I hate my Sequoia (I realize this is only going to be temporary - I hope, but at this moment I hate my truck). I am having flashbacks of my Range Rover which was an absolute love-hate relationship.

I am one of those proactive responsible vehicle maintenance people and this squeak which I cannot solve is bugging the crap out of me. When I drive I get all those "nice truck, too bad you don"t take care of it" looks.

The holes that the slide pins fit through do not have enough clearance to be able to fit anything around the pins. I don't believe that there is any way the pins can be installed with the tubes attached. To test this I tried a SINGLE layer of electrical tape and even that was too thick - I can't imagine that the plastic tubes are thinner than a layer of electrical tape. When trying to slide the pins through the holes the hole diameters are barely larger than the diameter of the pins and the holes just peeled the tape right off.

I then removed all the tape and coated the pins in high-temp grease and it was nearly all peeled off when I slid the pins in.

I don't want to bite the bullet and buy new pads (the current pads have what appears to be 80-90% remaining) because in my gut I believe it won't make a difference.

dBtoyz
01-21-2012, 07:18 AM
If you don't have these tubes installed now you should be aware of some install details. Looking at the tube, there is a side with a sealed, bulging tip. This tip gets inserted "through" the hole in the caliper and is sticking out the caliper body holding the tube end in place. The first time I took this out, I had to reinstall it with a long flat headed punch so it does not remain folded inside the caliper hole.

Hope this is your problem and your worries are over.

Good luck

dBtoyz
01-21-2012, 08:17 AM
I've been through these frustrations working through fault isolations. Nice warm cup of coffee or beer and a day to cooling when you can.

In 03, there are two flavors of Sequoia. This is the year Toyota addressed the undersized brake issue and mounted a 17" rim and a larger brake caliper. Mine is the latter. Make sure you take your VIN number when you pickup the hardware kits so that they give you the hardware for the correct brake.

I just looked at an online parts store at the different calipers. There is an A1 Cardone that looks like it only uses one pin that has the tube. This must be something new, I haven't seen this before.

I used to have Hawk pads (1 set) during my quest to find the best. Lotsa people complained about these noisy brakes but said good performance. When I had these, they would squeak below a certain speed or very slow braking (in line at a stop sign) and the performance was average.

I have one other suggestion which is reserved for newly installed pads, a process called seating your brakes. Go to a back road with no traffic, bring speed up to 55 mph and brake hard but do not lock or engage abs. As you slow to 5-10 mph, increase back to 55 for 1/4 mile and jump on the brakes again and repeat this for 4 or 5 times. At this point you can roll down your window and smell the pads heating up. Drive around for about five miles at a normal speed and little to no braking to cool rotors and pads down. When you get home, park the car until completely cool. Do not go through water or snow while doing this or risk warping rotors from sudden cooling.

Good luck.

bstaneland
01-25-2012, 09:21 AM
Thanks again for the helpful input.

With the idea that I may have a hardware kit that may not be specific to my brake caliper I will find both types and see what I can dig up. I suppose it is entirely possible that, since I am the second owner, the brake calipers may even be from a later model year that were changed prior to my ownership undertaking.

For anybody needing this same info, the below images may be of help. Left image is purportedly a 2001 caliper. Right image is purportedly a 2004 caliper:
82450 82451

I'll report back...

bstaneland
01-25-2012, 10:15 AM
I just had an interesting conversation with a friend that has a Dodge Durango. We discussed my squeak issue and he thought it might be the wheel bearing. I told him I didn't think it was a bearing because of the following:

(A) I had a bearing go out on me on a 2003 4Runner and not only could I feel it through the steering wheel the sound was also a different squeak.
(B) When I apply the brakes the squeak goes away - I can't see how applying the brakes would affect a wheel bearing.

He said when he replaced the wheel bearing the squeak went away. Has anyone ever had a similar experience or have any input on this?

cinch
01-25-2012, 04:26 PM
I just had an interesting conversation with a friend that has a Dodge Durango. We discussed my squeak issue and he thought it might be the wheel bearing. I told him I didn't think it was a bearing because of the following:

(A) I had a bearing go out on me on a 2003 4Runner and not only could I feel it through the steering wheel the sound was also a different squeak.
(B) When I apply the brakes the squeak goes away - I can't see how applying the brakes would affect a wheel bearing.

He said when he replaced the wheel bearing the squeak went away. Has anyone ever had a similar experience or have any input on this?


Could be if the wheel bearing is a little loose the rotor might lean in a little bit and cause the caliper to rub the rotor.

bstaneland
01-30-2012, 10:18 AM
Because I made a bonehead move, I'm sorry to be making this last comment as now this thread will be bumped to the top...

I have been figuratively bashing my head against the wall trying to figure out how to correct the front brake squeaking. Now I have to slap myself for being so dumb...

As it turns out it was the REAR brakes that were making this noise, not the front. This past weekend I had my wife drive while I rode next to the Sequoia carefully listening and heard it coming from the rear. I started my troubleshooting first with a replacement set of disc brake hardware and sure enough that fixed it. Note that I also used a store counter point-of-sale packet of Sil-Glyde lubricant and slathered the new brake hardware with it.

I did notice that this new brake hardware has a black-colored material on the backside of the hardware brackets that was not on the brake hardware I initially installed with the new pads & rotors. Maybe this is what is making the difference? Note that this latest rear brake hardware I bought from Autozone for only $6.99 (does both sides of the rear axle) is part # H5651 Duralast. Fits 2001, 2002 (check with Autozone for application to other possible model years).

Thanks everyone that offered suggestions/tips and sorry that it was all for naught. That being said, maybe the info in this post can offer some help to somebody...

Cheers!

Ben