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: Tundra Towing MPG



TundradudeV8
05-27-2002, 05:02 PM
What kind of towing MPG have you seen?

My experience is this:

At 60 mph:

V6 11 mpg
V8 10 mpg

At 75 mph:

V8 8 mpg

This is towing roughly around a 5000 lb 26 travel trailer.

I just got back from a 12 hour trip (one-way) to Disneyworld.

I wish the Tundra had a bigger or second gas tank.

beckerg
05-27-2002, 06:34 PM
I'm getting 14-15 mpg towing about 2600 lbs at 60-65 mph average.

geneowens
05-28-2002, 04:26 AM
Towing approx 5000 pound fifth wheel, I am getting 9.5 at 70 + and 10.5 at 65. This is with V8, 4X4, regular cab.

ericdetwiler
05-30-2002, 01:43 PM
Towing a 6000 pound Travel Trailer.

SR5 2 wheel.... 10 mpg at 60 mph

.... 9 mpg at 70 mph

T'sTOY
05-30-2002, 04:43 PM
Just got back from a holiday trip from the Denver area to southern Colorado, and my 2000 model V8 recorded 12.34 mpg on the Southbound leg and 13.68 mpg on the Northbound leg. I was towing about 2000 lb. (trailer and cargo), and 95% of the mileage was on the interstate doing between 65 and 80 mph.

Parshal
05-31-2002, 08:28 AM
I towed a 2500 lbs. trailer from Denver to northwest Colorado and got around 15 - 16 mpg. That's much better than once last winter towing a 2000 lbs. trailer back from Kansas with a 40 mph headwind. On that trip I got 7.5 mpg!

Dogster
06-01-2002, 01:23 AM
I towed a 4800 lb. boat from CA to NV and AZ. I generally got 10-11 mpg at 60-70 with the AC on in a 4x4 Limited. The exception was coming back running 60 mph in a 35 mph+ headwind. Then I got 7.8 mpg (at $2.25/gallon too!)

MCoupe
06-01-2002, 06:09 AM
I have a 2000 V8, which normally gets 18 mpg (mostly highway).

I towed a car down to florida and back this Spring. 10-11 hours each way, 75-85 mph. Car is almost exactly 3,000 lbs, trailer is roughly 1,300.

13-14 mpg, essentially all highway. Had one tank that pinged like crazy, so stopped and put some premium in.

Darned happy with the setup. Darned happy. Never any trouble.

I bought the Tundra specifically to pull this car, and be my daily driver. It now looks like I'm about to buy a race car that weighs only 750 pounds. Ah, well.

MCoupe
07-30-2002, 03:07 PM
Just an interesting tidbit.

I have a 2WD V8 automatic Tundra, and typically get 18mpg, mostly highway - which I am very happy with.

I towed my car to a race a few months ago, on an open dual axle trailer, kind of like a flatbed truck with the car sitting open on the trailer. 3,000 pound car, 1,500 pound trailer, 4,500 pounds total. 10 hours each way. And I got 14mpg. Fine. Well, pretty good, actually.

I just hauled my new trailer, enclosed, one axle, and new (much smaller) car. Total weight 2,500 pounds. Low rise trailer, 6'9" tall. 11mpg.

Fascinating what pulling a brick does to gas mileage!

rodchester
07-30-2002, 04:30 PM
Like pulling a parachute.

Andy
07-30-2002, 05:07 PM
I was always curious of this fact...aerodynamics of whatever is being pulled. Looking into the Honda Pilot, the salesman told me that it could pull more weight if it was a boat vice a camper/trailer. Don't remember the exact number, but it was something like 1000 lbs more. Seems a bit extra to me, but interesting based on the aerodynamics nonetheless.

Frozen2000
07-31-2002, 11:37 AM
I too get about what everyone is saying. Empty, daily driver is around 17ish. I pull two wheelers on an aluminum sled trailer, about 1500 lbs. At 60-70 mph on interstate and on back highways going through little towns (I slow down in the little towns!) I average around 13 mpg. My friend has a 02 Chevy with the smaller V-8 and says his truck gets about the same. So it looks like the Tundra gets the same mileage but oh so much better of a ride.

not so FROZEN2000 this summer!

randyeverett
07-31-2002, 11:20 PM
I have a 2000 ext cab, V8, 4x2, with a Checker snugtop hard Tonneau. Towed my popup camper, which weighs about 2000lb, and had another 250lb in truck bed to Florida and back, around 1500mi. Averaged 16 mpg all the way there and back........A/C on the whole time with lots of hills in Alabama and Tenn. This was my first time towing any distance with the Tundra, so I'm very pleased. It tows the popup extremely well, you can't even tell it's back there. I expect your right, towing a full trailer (brick) would knock the mileage down severly.
I average 19mpg strait highway with just me, and 16-17mpg to work and back (mostly hiwhway).
I bought the Tundra used and am very satisfied so far.
Have fun...............
Everett

abrams57
08-01-2002, 06:34 PM
What with all you guys getting 18 - 21 mpg. I have an '02' V8 and the only mods I've made is a K&N FIPK and TRD dual exhaust. I'm getting on average 12 -13 mpg:cry: I always drive in O/D, so what else could it be?

randyeverett
08-02-2002, 10:31 AM
I don't know why some Tundra owners only get 12-13mpg. The difference may be multiple things that add up in the end.
Here's my truck:
2000 Tundra, ext cab with 2wd (less weight & drive train loss?)
I drive mostly highway
Lightweight, hard tonneau cover, flush-mount (1mpg by some reports)
87 octane with fuel injector cleaner every oil change
5W-30 oil
no nerf bars (less drag?)

August 2002, Poplar Science did a small, unoffical study to improve gas mileage on a pickup truck based on recommendations from a GM aerodynamics dude. Some of the suggestions were impractical, so you're mileage may vary on some of these mods.

:D

1. Taped over parts of the grill, fog lights, ect. (was a diesel engine)
2. removed nerf bars
3. added hard tonneau
4. filled in space between frame rails and body on the underside
5. They set cruise at 55mpg (the faster you try to push the brick, the more mojo it takes.)

Like I said, some were impractical......
The results were the Silverado Ls 2500HD with a 6.6 turbo-diesel went from 17 mpg to 26 mpg...........interesting.

FYI, I've only had one K&N filter and that was on my T-bird. It dropped my mileage from 25 to 23 for over two years. Pulled the K&N out and mileage went back up. Go figure........it did seem to improve high rpm flow (above 4,000rpm). Granted, mine was only a study of one.

Good luck, and keep us informed if you try that frame-rail thing
:D
Everett

Tundra00
08-02-2002, 12:45 PM
I towed my Dad's boat to the coast and got around 17 MPG on the round trip. The boat is a 17' center console bay boat and weighs about 2500 lbs all together.

5thwheeler
08-06-2002, 03:34 PM
My Tundra and fifthwheel have a GCVWR of 11,200 pounds scale weight, and I get about 12 MPG on average.

The fifthwheel has straight axels and the springs were reversed. It has a fair amount of wind resistance.

chuff
08-07-2002, 08:57 AM
I pull 5th wheel triple axle 6 place enclosed steel snowmobile trailer to Wyoming at least 3 times a year, about 10.5 hours one way from home to Laramie. Trailer weighs about 3300, each snowmobile is roughly 500, Two adults 350, gear oil stuff for six people in trailer maybe 600 pounds. for a grand total of 7250 pounds. I average about 6.5mpg on the way out, always gotta be blowin at least 25mph, gotta fill up about every 150 miles; but on the way home I might get 11mpg. I ussually go about 70 to 80mph. So if I were pullin on a day with zero wind on level ground at 75mph I should get about 8.75mpg. Not bad at 7250 pounds. No worse than anybody else in our convoy which ussually includes a V-10 Ford and 6.0 Chevy.

Vince
08-16-2002, 12:19 PM
Just got back from Washington D.C. to Dallas. Averaged 16 mpg from Dallas to D.C; however, averaged 21 mpg from D.C. to Dallas.

Altered4X
08-17-2002, 04:12 PM
I avarage 12-13 MPG with

Open Car hauler-1200
Car-2500
Supplies-300
Passengers-380

Total- 4380

I tow with My O/D off. 65-70
I love the 3k humm of the engine!
Im planning on going I/H/E (intake header exhaust) and see if i see any improvemnts.

Laterz:D

turbohawk
02-18-2003, 09:32 AM
I pulled a 600 pound trailer with a 700 pound load 1000 miles over the last few days and averaged 11mpg the whole trip (there and back). The first half was mostly uphill (7000 ft total elevation change) and of course the return trip was mostly downhill.

I wasn't expecting such a low mpg figure with such a light load (no where near the max towing capacity) and my "moving" average according to my GPS was 60mph.

Anyone else noted similar figures or is something wrong with my rig?

redbaron224
02-18-2003, 10:32 AM
While pulling our 6,000 lb., 26' Travel Trailer the fuel mileage is only 7 mpg. This is without overdrive. When we go to the beach in the spring I will attempt to pull in OD but where we are now (blueridge mts.) it "hunts" top gear too often.

MCoupe
02-18-2003, 03:38 PM
I get about 11 mpg pulling my 2,500 pound enclosed trailer. One axle, but only 6 foot high, so an easier tow than most enclosed ones. Several tanks checked, regular tow now.

And I got 13-14 mpg pulling 4,500 pounds on an open trailer. Better aerodynamics. Atlanta to So Florida and back. Knocked like a b after one tank at steady throttle, I assume bad gas.

I cruise at 75 or so. Don't pass going uphill, not quite enough V in my 8.

2000 2WD V8. I use OD, know I shouldn't, but few hills. . .

KLS
02-18-2003, 07:57 PM
Originally posted by redbaron224
While pulling our 6,000 lb., 26' Travel Trailer the fuel mileage is only 7 mpg. This is without overdrive. When we go to the beach in the spring I will attempt to pull in OD but where we are now (blueridge mts.) it "hunts" top gear too often.


Don't use OD with a 3-ton trailer. You put too much strain on the transmission, and it'll shift frequently which may overheat it. You're probably at or over the truck's 11,800# GCWR.

You have flushed that transmission occasionally, right? If not, I'd add Auto-Rx, drive for 1000-1500 miles, then do a complete flush and replace with Mobil 1 ATF or maybe Schaeffer's #204S ATF. http://www.auto-rx.net

The same product, 12 oz. into your engine for 500 miles, will remove any carbon in your ring grooves and other places, and may make your engine produce more power. A clean engine has more power, better fuel economy, and less wear. http://www.auto-rx.com It costs a bit, but ask for a deal...they often run discounts.

With that much weight and the frontal area of your trailer, the only way to improve gas mileage is to go slower...I know, that's not what you wanted to hear.


Ken

redbaron224
02-18-2003, 08:31 PM
Ken,

Thanks for the tips. Yep, flushed the tranny regularly. My neighbor jokes about me saving my used fluid for him because it is so clean.:D Based on your suggestion I will try auto-rx in the engine since it has so many miles. Others have warned against putting syn oil in an older engine due to dino oil buildup causing grime that will break loose and possibly plug oil galleys. Does this apply with the auto-rx flushing fluid?

Claiming 7 mpg wasn't a complaint, just simply a statement. I expected worse actually. I get a lot of enjoyment in driving this truck so the few camping trips we make each year are not a big detriment to the overall satisfaction of ownership.

Toyota - I love what you do for me! :D

bearsfolks
02-18-2003, 10:19 PM
I get about 9-10 out of overdrive, and about 11 when the terrain is flat and I can use it. My trailer has a loaded weight of about 5800#. I have used Mobil 1 oil since the first change, and Mobil 1 synthetic transmission fluid since 24,000 miles. I now have about 31,000 with no problems.

RitcheyRch
02-19-2003, 04:23 AM
I got 16 towing my Sea-Doos to the river last summer

sdmahr
02-23-2003, 07:10 AM
Pulling single axle (5 X 8 ft), enclosed trailer @ 70 mph combo hills & flat: 11 mpg

Pulling 21ft Ski Boat @ 75 mph (in a hurry to get to the lake ;) ) I get about 13 mpg. (Boat is "slicker" in the airstream)

Pulling 24ft travel trailer @ 65 - 70 mph yielded about 9 mpg.

My F-150 got a little better mileage but I wouldn't go back to it if they gave it back to me ! :p

DH Auto
08-23-2003, 09:52 PM
I tow a car 60-80mph with aircondition on and get 15mpg,that's why I sold my 5.9L dodge-it did 12mpg.THe tundra has the same power and better mpg.I cannot belive 9mpg.

Vu
08-24-2003, 10:21 PM
I towed a 2000 lb trailer with the tundra and got 9 mpg.

When I got my cummins dodge, I towed a 31" ex-navy rescue boat with a 671 detroit diesel motor on a custom made trailer that weighed over 14,000 lbs and got around 14 mpg.

Dude Boy
08-24-2003, 11:07 PM
I towed a 6 x 12 enclosed trailer into a headwind and got about 13.5 MPG. The only thing I had in the trailer was a piano

5thwheeler
08-25-2003, 05:26 PM
I pull a 24 ft. 5400 lb. fifthwheel and I get 10-11 mpg.

fishguy
09-10-2003, 11:44 AM
I recently towed my 3,000 lb. boat and trailer several hundred miles round trip to a lake in Idaho, not flat but not too many hills either. I drove about 65 mph with the O/D off and averaged about 10 miles per gallon with my V8. For reference, wuloaded and cruising at 72 mph I get 18 miles per gallon.

stryker_20
09-11-2003, 04:24 PM
I have a 2003 sr5 v8 2wd. I can haul around 2000-2500 postholes and still get 16-19 mpg. Go figure.
:)

Rick!
01-18-2004, 09:25 PM
I pull 5th wheel triple axle 6 place enclosed steel snowmobile trailer to Wyoming at least 3 times a year, about 10.5 hours one way from home to Laramie. Trailer weighs about 3300, each snowmobile is roughly 500, Two adults 350, gear oil stuff for six people in trailer maybe 600 pounds. for a grand total of 7250 pounds. I average about 6.5mpg on the way out, always gotta be blowin at least 25mph, gotta fill up about every 150 miles; but on the way home I might get 11mpg. I ussually go about 70 to 80mph. So if I were pullin on a day with zero wind on level ground at 75mph I should get about 8.75mpg. Not bad at 7250 pounds. No worse than anybody else in our convoy which ussually includes a V-10 Ford and 6.0 Chevy.

I just ran from home to Alpine, WY and back with an open 4 place. Into the wind no matter what direction I drove. Low of 4.5mpg from Sioux Falls to some podunk place still south of ND on I-29. High of 10.12 coming down from Togwotee pass. Average of around 7mpg at best driving at about 67mph. A lot of 6.5mpg stops and 150-180 mile gas stops. It will do 92 with pedal left but's that's all you need to drive past a new SD gasser.
:D

DCTUNDRA
01-20-2004, 12:41 PM
Just got back from a "tow trip" from Ohio to Connecticut, towed a Mazda Miata with a Kar-Kaddy tow dolly over the hills of northern Pa and New York. With a blustery wind, got around 13mpg with a 2004 Tundra DC 4.7 v-8. Speed was around 65mph most of the time. I was surprised at the effectiveness of the braking. Didn't have trailer or vehicle brakes on the Miata and everything stopped great! The owner's manual reccommends brakes for over 1,000lbs, but I think that is being a little conservative after this trip. I'm estimating the weight of the Miata at around 2,200 lbs and the Kar-Kaddy at around 400lbs for a combines weight of 2,600lbs. The package has very little frontal area, so wind resistance probably wasn't all that much. I would think that a conventional trailer with a similar weight but greater frontal area would have reduced the mileage to around 10-11 mpg.

docsg
01-20-2004, 08:07 PM
I have a 2003 sr5 v8 2wd. I can haul around 2000-2500 postholes and still get 16-19 mpg. Go figure.
:)


I have the same model and year and you are right--go figure! I wouldn't do that good with no passengers, no towing, and with a 100 mph wind at my back. You are fortunate and IMO I would NEVER sell your Tundra. I love mine but it has a healthier appetite than yours. I have an enclosed Wells Cargo motorcycle trailer and plan to use it a lot this summer for the first time with my Tundra. I will gladly give up mpg for being able to top a hill at the same speed I started up it. My '01 Ranger would lose 20-25 mph on grades that were relatively long as the Tundras with trailers blew by me--

nyctundra
01-20-2004, 09:39 PM
Just got back from a 750+ mile trip with a 3000 car and a uhaul auto transport in tow. MPG was about 11mpg. The trip was across the Pocano mountains. Truck performed flawlessly. No complaints. :cool:

Sequoia2003
01-20-2004, 10:29 PM
My Tundra used to get about 10mpg when towing 5000lbs on average. About 8mpg going up the pass.

My Dodge Hemi 2500 4x4 QC 8ft bed gets about the same mileage, but weighs more than 1,500lbs then my Tundra did. :D

docsg
01-20-2004, 11:20 PM
By the way--did any of you tow with Tundras that did not have the factory tow package? I have an '03 SR5 V8 with the distributor installed tow package (class III, 4-pin connector) which does not include a transmission cooler. My enclosed trailer and bike have a GVWR of slightly less than 2000 lbs. and I want to make sure I won't have any problems. Your comments would be greatly appreciated--

P.S. I know this is not the exact subject of this thread and a response in "What's in the Tow Package" might be more appropriate. There are several of us in the same boat and need some advice. I am relatively new to TS and have found the advice so far to be outstanding!

Wstar425
01-22-2004, 11:06 PM
I pull a two horse Featherlight and have found out that since I cut the floor out of the trailer and make them push I can actually get 35 to 40 mpg with my SR5 4x4. But, I have a limited top speed of around 20 mph, and not for very long! Will have to up the oats supply - JUST KIDDING!!

Can't quite get 18 around town.
13-14 with the trailer and two horses and tack.
Tundra makes an excellant horse hauler as long as you keep it reasonable. One horse in the trailer with no constraints and it moves the truck around quite a bit.

http://groups.msn.com/CcalahBakersHorses/bakersacres.msnw?action=ShowPhoto&PhotoID=43

Doug

docsg
01-23-2004, 10:11 PM
What with all you guys getting 18 - 21 mpg. I have an '02' V8 and the only mods I've made is a K&N FIPK and TRD dual exhaust. I'm getting on average 12 -13 mpg:cry: I always drive in O/D, so what else could it be?


FYI--I think your mpg is closer to normal (espeically for in-town) and if you did a pole of the majority of Tundra owners in my area you would probably find they getting the mileage you are (and I am as well). I added the K&N air filter, changed to Mobil 1 Syn, and drive at very reasonable speeds. Problem is I hardly ever get out on the highway for sustained hwy miles and most of my trips are 10 miles or less. I envy those who get the 16 - 17+ mpg. My dealer said they should never sell their trucks as with average in-town mpg's that high they could get near sticker for the used ones. When I told him what I was averaging which is like yours (I only have 5K on the truck) his comment was "wow--that good." After that I did not pursue the matter any further. I live in a warm climate where a cold night is 40 degrees and inside my garage the lowest temp is in the mid-50s. Thus the truck does not have a problem getting to operating temperature quickly. I, like you, don't know what else to do so I will just live with it as the other benefits of the Tundra outweight the low mpg. Thanks for quoting your mgg--it makes me feel a little better.

wooterdude
01-28-2004, 08:15 PM
What with all you guys getting 18 - 21 mpg. I have an '02' V8 and the only mods I've made is a K&N FIPK and TRD dual exhaust. I'm getting on average 12 -13 mpg:cry: I always drive in O/D, so what else could it be?KEEP YOUR FOOT OUT OF IT.ARES IS NEW AND WE ARE GETTING ALMOST 14 TOWN.OUR 01 SEQUOIA WAS GETTING 21 HIGHWAY.SAME ENGINE AND 5500 LBS WITH ME AND MY WIFE AND A FULL TANK OF GAS WITH SOME LUGGAGE.WENT TO SANFRAN AND BACK AND CAME UP 101 WE AVERAGE 17.9 FOR THE WHOLE TRIP BOTH AIRCONDITIONERS ON.

jrinna
02-08-2004, 06:16 AM
KEEP YOUR FOOT OUT OF IT.ARES IS NEW AND WE ARE GETTING ALMOST 14 TOWN.OUR 01 SEQUOIA WAS GETTING 21 HIGHWAY.SAME ENGINE AND 5500 LBS WITH ME AND MY WIFE AND A FULL TANK OF GAS WITH SOME LUGGAGE.WENT TO SANFRAN AND BACK AND CAME UP 101 WE AVERAGE 17.9 FOR THE WHOLE TRIP BOTH AIRCONDITIONERS ON.
I get what everybody else seems to be getting, i.e., 11 MPG. I tow a dual axle 20" travel trailer rated at 5000 lbs. I never use overdrive and tow at speeds ranging between 60 and 65 mph.

wooterdude
03-01-2004, 09:17 PM
I was always curious of this fact...aerodynamics of whatever is being pulled. Looking into the Honda Pilot, the salesman told me that it could pull more weight if it was a boat vice a camper/trailer. Don't remember the exact number, but it was something like 1000 lbs more. Seems a bit extra to me, but interesting based on the aerodynamics nonetheless.wheel base too short,towed 24 foot with trailblazer and had sway problems

04Toy
03-03-2004, 09:38 AM
It seems like there is quite a variance in V8 gas mileage. Does anyone have any info on the pros of changing the air filter/intake and exhaust? Is it worth the $$ and does it really help the mileage? If so, what is the best system/combo out there?

Thanks

RockyMtnRay
03-03-2004, 12:24 PM
It seems like there is quite a variance in V8 gas mileage. Does anyone have any info on the pros of changing the air filter/intake and exhaust? Is it worth the $$ and does it really help the mileage? If so, what is the best system/combo out there?

Thanks
see the answer I gave on your top level thread on V8 gas mileage mods...basically there are NO mods that will improve the mileage on a '03 or '04

KLS
03-03-2004, 02:57 PM
It seems like there is quite a variance in V8 gas mileage. Does anyone have any info on the pros of changing the air filter/intake and exhaust? Is it worth the $$ and does it really help the mileage? If so, what is the best system/combo out there?

Thanks

No, it'll never pay for itself in gas savings. And, it likely won't make any difference except in noise levels.

Here's K&N's dyno chart. Note that below 3000 rpm its a loser, and even at 3500 rpm you gain a whopping 5.7% hp increase. For the amount of time you run at 3500 rpm or above, how much money will a 5% fuel savings make for you and how long to pay off the ~$300 cost of the FIPK?
http://www.kandn.com/dynocharts/57-9020.jpg

The horsepower claims for exhaust systems are also skewed toward peak rpms, not working rpms. With the rpms you'll run, you'll notice little or no benefit, just lots of tiresome noise.

The S&S headers do look promising, but we haven't got any reports of towing yet. The power gain is tuned for mid range, but these also will never pay for themselves in fuel savings.


Ken

tuntoy
03-03-2004, 09:07 PM
My truck got 8.5 MPG towing my 16' camper this weekend. On the highway the mileage is about 14 and a terrible 12 in the city.

mejones53
09-18-2004, 04:52 PM
Towing a 3200 Lb. pop-up in Florida, where the only mountains you see are trash dump sites. 15-16 MPG highway at 65-70 MPH

rfwright
09-22-2004, 05:59 PM
Towing 27' Travel trailer...aprox 5500# loaded
8.5 at 70mph
9 at 65mph
9.5-10 at 55-60mph

mike.elmes
09-22-2004, 07:40 PM
Towing my 2200 lb boat at a very fast clip got me a whopping 300km on a tank of premium for my s/c'd V8.:p I don't want to know how bad it got in MPG. On the other hand while towing the same boat at a more reasonable speed,on the same trip I got 450km on a tank.....quite a difference!

toyotafreak
09-22-2004, 10:44 PM
Toyota Epic S22 (maybe 5500 with trailer), '03 Sequoia, 10.5 MPG at around 70 MPH. Lots of data to support that one. And this is GPS-calibrated, by the way.

Never forget that your tires are almost always off appreciably (the smallest stock tires are pretty close), so your ODO is off (my 17" Dunlops are of over 4%) and the 'AVG MPG' indiacation is really like 1 mpg optimistic.

Westwind
10-17-2004, 07:23 PM
I tow a 27 Ft Sunnybrook Travel Trailer with my 2000 Tundra Access Ltd
using a Hensley hitch between the truck and trailer. The trailer weights
about 5400 empty and 6000 with all our etc's.
I get 9.0 to 10.5 depending on speed, incline, and wind when I tow
it to Florida from Rhode Island and back. I have used both routes
I95 and I81/I84 and even thought the 81/84 route has steep
inclines the mileage is about the same.
I want to mention that my trailer is almost 29' from rear bumper to
hitch ball and using the Hensley I have no sway whatsoever. This
hitch device is worth all the money I paid it, I have been going 65
to 70 and had trailer trucks blow by me like I was standing still and
had no sway to mention. I recommend it highly. :)

JDSTOY
10-18-2004, 01:41 PM
Towing a 4200 pound Center Console Boat I get 10-10.5 mpg going. Travelling 75 MPH average.
Towing Same boat back home I average 11-11.5 mpg. Traveling 65 MPH average.

Day to day driving I average a very consistent 16.5 mpg.

After adding a K&N FIPK my day to day driving averaged 16.5 mpg and alot of excess intake noise. The tow mpg average, however, went up 1-1.5 mpg each way. I ran with this setup for about 18 months but the noise was too great so I'm back to the stock intake setup now.

wes 03
10-19-2004, 10:26 AM
on thursday im goin to make a 125 mile trip with just a 1500 lb trailer, then i gotta pick up a fullsize bronco, it should be interesting. we are in a HUGE bind and so i gotta tow this thing back, should weigh around 7k total. i know im over the limit, but i dont have much of a choice. i will report back with milage numbers

wes

scottfraser
10-19-2004, 12:00 PM
2k Tundra limited towing a 24' 4 sled trailer (5500lbs) in the winter I usually get approx. 12 mpg (Canadian gallon) @ 5-60 mph.

shawnocaster
10-20-2004, 02:44 PM
I towed a couple ATV's on a trailer between 1500 - 2000 lbs total weight and struggled to get 9 mpg @ 70 mph. Left the overdrive on which may have been a mistake. On flat ground it is OK but on any kind of an incline it shifts between gears quite a bit. I usually get around 12 mpg towing.

wes 03
10-22-2004, 01:07 PM
on thursday im goin to make a 125 mile trip with just a 1500 lb trailer, then i gotta pick up a fullsize bronco, it should be interesting. we are in a HUGE bind and so i gotta tow this thing back, should weigh around 7k total. i know im over the limit, but i dont have much of a choice. i will report back with milage numbers

wes
i got around 12 mpg while being light on the pedal the whole way. i drove about 75 on the way there with the empty 1500lb trailer. on the way back we drove about 60 the whole way with the 7000lbs of trailer and bronco. check my pics for pics of the setup

wes

TetTundra
10-26-2004, 10:31 PM
Can't say that my trailer towing mileage was significantly different than a regular loaded (truck bed) trip. The most I've pulled and hauled was a fully loaded Tundra (bed with cab-hi shell to the max, with heavy tools; racks on top with two bikes) and a 6X12' dual axle trailer loaded full of furniture. I was careful to load everything balanced, and the truck did very well. Went up over Donner pass downshifted to "2" and got a bit over 13 mpg, at about 50-60 mph. Straight hiway was 14-15 mpg. I'm OK with that. Still need more than 240 hp, tho. "Normal" load for the same trip would be 15-19 mpg. One thing I have noticed though: The Tundra LIKES to pull. The engine revs and purrs marvelously, and shifts WAY smoother than with no load around town. Anyone understand this?

DerekB
11-07-2004, 11:19 PM
Just got back from a trip to San Diego and back from San Francisco. Over the 900 miles I averaged betweek 6.5 and 8.0 mpg towing a 7000 lbs enclosed 20' car hauler @65mph. My truck is a 2000 Limited 2WD with a TRD supercharger.

Ran out of gas on the grapevine at 142 miles/tank. Luckily I had a 5 gallon jug of fuel for the racecar. Does anyone know someone who has successfully added an auxillary fuel tank?

-Derek

04DSGTUNDRA
11-22-2004, 05:17 PM
I'mm glad I'm not the only one getting not so good gas mileage when towing.... This weekend I towed a 24ft Fleetwood RV Toy hauler, dry weight is 7000lbs (it has bigger tanks, gen., pump station, etc), we loaded it with food for 3 days, and 3 quads (at 350lbs each) firewood, spare paddle tires for bikes, etc. I estimate it being around 8200 lbs loaded up. we averaged about 7.5mpg on the way to Glamis (maybe only 2 large hills to climb) doing 70-75mph. I have a 2004 access cab v8 trd 2wd tundra. in 350 miles we used about 3 full tanks. it seems every couple hours we were stopping to fill up. We're going to try and tow with our 4-runner next time, its a 2003 4runner sr5 2wd. I think it has the 283hp vvti iforce v8 in it, and the 5-speed tranny because it moves alot better then the tundra. I think that should do better. Besides the gas mileage the tundra towed really nice, I loved passing up non diesel 2500hd's on hills, and many other trucks towing toy haulers and fifth wheels. I run load levelers on the trailer and sway controller device when towing, the truck doesnt squat too much.

5thwheeler
11-24-2004, 12:36 PM
I'mm glad I'm not the only one getting not so good gas mileage when towing.... This weekend I towed a 24ft Fleetwood RV Toy hauler, dry weight is 7000lbs (it has bigger tanks, gen., pump station, etc), we loaded it with food for 3 days, and 3 quads (at 350lbs each) firewood, spare paddle tires for bikes, etc. I estimate it being around 8200 lbs loaded up. we averaged about 7.5mpg on the way to Glamis (maybe only 2 large hills to climb) doing 70-75mph. I have a 2004 access cab v8 trd 2wd tundra. in 350 miles we used about 3 full tanks. it seems every couple hours we were stopping to fill up. We're going to try and tow with our 4-runner next time, its a 2003 4runner sr5 2wd. I think it has the 283hp vvti iforce v8 in it, and the 5-speed tranny because it moves alot better then the tundra. I think that should do better. Besides the gas mileage the tundra towed really nice, I loved passing up non diesel 2500hd's on hills, and many other trucks towing toy haulers and fifth wheels. I run load levelers on the trailer and sway controller device when towing, the truck doesnt squat too much.

8200 pounds loaded ???? You got to be kidding!!!! 9200 pounds is more like it! Then add the passengers and all the crap in the bed of the truck and you are so overweight its scary!

jan kohlmann
12-01-2004, 04:09 PM
I get 11 mpg pulling a horse trailer with one horse. The trailer is tall at 7.5 feet and weighs with horse about 5000lbs. 4x4 01 Tundra ltd.

cannondale27
12-01-2004, 04:16 PM
Went to Pennsylvania from WI towing 6x12 enclosed trailer with two ATV's and one in back turnpike all the way 14mpg going there and 8mpg on return trip.Wind is the mileage killer.

spkrmakr
12-02-2004, 09:49 AM
New boat and new 05 Tundra with extra HP and 5-speed tranny. 11 mpg with a 2,500 lb boat on flat Florida roads.

rfwright
12-06-2004, 11:24 AM
27' Bunkhouse travel trailer 5500# loaded to go
9mpg at 60mph
8.5mph at 65mph

5thwheeler
12-08-2004, 12:29 PM
I do a lot of towing with my Tundra, and I have been following this thread very closely, but I can't help but wonder how some of us come up with the weight numbers I see. Are these true weights, or calculated ones? The only true weight is one gotten from a scale. Frankly, I find it hard buying into some of the weights im seeing here.

Toyota calculates their weight using a 150 pound driver and a full tank of gas, thats it! Add another 150 pound passenger or two, a captains chair, side nerf bars, overload springs, second tyranny cooler (a must when towing), fifthwheel or heavy duty anti sway hitch, and all the other things we install on our trucks, and one can see that our trucks are heavier then we initially though. Some by as much as 700 or more pounds. Now add up the (estimated) weight of all the stuff we put in the bed of our trucks for an average camping trip and surprise, surprise? One can see that its real easy to exceed the gross vehicle weight rating of our Trundra's.

Now lets look at the average ultra light fifthwheel or travel trailer. If you didn't take your brand new trailer from the dealers lot to the scales, you really don't know how much it weighs. But you can be sure it's heavier then the dealer says it is. All new travel and fifthwheel trailers post the dry weight of their trailers on an inside cabinet. This weight doesn't include any options installed at the factory, or by the dealer. The dry weight doesn't include the battery or batteries, propane, water, options (like the air conditioner), and everything else we load into your trailer for an average weekend trip. If you want a ball park figure of the loaded and ready to rock and roll weight, add another 1500 to 2000 pounds. I suggest you take your fully loaded rig to the scales and weigh it, and if you think sticker shock is bad, wait till you see your true weight numbers. Chances are your rig has exceeded the the GVWR (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating) specified by Toyota. Not good! Most fifthwheel pullers are at, or over the RAWR Rear Axel Weight Rating) for their Tundra's, this extra weight puts added stress on the bearing, axle and the suspension system. Overload springs or airbags don't change the RAWR, thats a fixed number. The bottom line is take your truck and trailer to a scales, pay the $8.00's and find out the true weight of your rig. Keep this in mind, if you are involved in an accident and your overweight, your guilty! Better safe then sorry!

RockyMtnRay
12-08-2004, 01:31 PM
I do a lot of towing with my Tundra, and I have been following this thread very closely, but I can't help but wonder how some of us come up with the weight numbers I see. Are these true weights, or calculated ones? The only true weight is one gotten from a scale. Frankly, I find it hard buying into some of the weights im seeing here.

Toyota calculates their weight using a 150 pound driver and a full tank of gas, thats it! Add another 150 pound passenger or two, a captains chair, side nerf bars, overload springs, second tyranny cooler (a must when towing), fifthwheel or heavy duty anti sway hitch, and all the other things we install on our trucks, and one can see that our trucks are heavier then we initially though. Some by as much as 700 or more pounds. Now add up the (estimated) weight of all the stuff we put in the bed of our trucks for an average camping trip and surprise, surprise? One can see that its real easy to exceed the gross vehicle weight rating of our Trundra's.

Now lets look at the average ultra light fifthwheel or travel trailer. If you didn't take your brand new trailer from the dealers lot to the scales, you really don't know how much it weighs. But you can be sure it's heavier then the dealer says it is. All new travel and fifthwheel trailers post the dry weight of their trailers on an inside cabinet. This weight doesn't include any options installed at the factory, or by the dealer. The dry weight doesn't include the battery or batteries, propane, water, options (like the air conditioner), and everything else we load into your trailer for an average weekend trip. If you want a ball park figure of the loaded and ready to rock and roll weight, add another 1500 to 2000 pounds. I suggest you take your fully loaded rig to the scales and weigh it, and if you think sticker shock is bad, wait till you see your true weight numbers. Chances are your rig has exceeded the the GVWR (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating) specified by Toyota. Not good! Most fifthwheel pullers are at, or over the RAWR Rear Axel Weight Rating) for their Tundra's, this extra weight puts added stress on the bearing, axle and the suspension system. Overload springs or airbags don't change the RAWR, thats a fixed number. The bottom line is take your truck and trailer to a scales, pay the $8.00's and find out the true weight of your rig. Keep this in mind, if you are involved in an accident and your overweight, your guilty! Better safe then sorry!

I heartily second everything that 5thwheeler has said here. Another option for getting your rig weighed is to attend an RV Safety Education Organization Weight Seminar and Weighing. Unlike at commercial scales, the RVSEF folks will provide the weight on each individual wheel of your truck and trailer so you can see any side/side imbalance. Here is the RVSEF Weight Seminar/Weighin Schedule for 2005 (http://www.rvsafety.org/schedule.cfm)

fcatwo
12-08-2004, 01:49 PM
I was just reading the fine print in Toyota's extended warranty and "towing a trailer weighing more than the manufacturers recommended max" is one of the things that voids the warranty. Snow plowing and racing are other no-no's. There was also a situation discussed over at RV.net recently where a driver was charged with a criminal offense and got jail time (among other bad things) for losing control of his rig and causing a fatal accident while towing overloaded. His was an extreme case in that his truck was raised, he had baloon tires and was towing a huge toy hauler with four 4-wheelers in the back. There have been other reports of Troopers weighing rigs that were involved in accidents in the last couple of years so it's not just a matter of fuel economy.

5thwheeler
12-09-2004, 10:27 AM
I heartily second everything that 5thwheeler has said here. Another option for getting your rig weighed is to attend an RV Safety Education Organization Weight Seminar and Weighing. Unlike at commercial scales, the RVSEF folks will provide the weight on each individual wheel of your truck and trailer so you can see any side/side imbalance. Here is the RVSEF Weight Seminar/Weighin Schedule for 2005 (http://www.rvsafety.org/schedule.cfm)

Hi Ray, thanks for the RVSEF link. Wow, i've been towing fifthwheels and pop-ups forever and I never heard of the RVSEF. I will be getting in touch with these folks and plain to attend one of their seminars.

fcatwo, I haven't visited RV.net in a while, is there a link to the RVSEF on RV.net?

Thanks again guys...

HockeyFreak
12-09-2004, 10:30 AM
I just towed my '46 John Deere Tractor (5000 lbs) 1100 miles from KS to NC and I averaged 10-11 MPG while running 60-70 with OD off. :tu: So, I thought that was fairly decent.

RockyMtnRay
12-09-2004, 11:32 AM
Hi Ray, thanks for the RVSEF link. Wow, i've been towing fifthwheels and pop-ups forever and I never heard of the RVSEF. I will be getting in touch with these folks and plain to attend one of their seminars.

fcatwo, I haven't visited RV.net in a while, is there a link to the RVSEF on RV.net?

Thanks again guys...
Welcome. Yeah, I definitely recommend attending an RVSEF seminar and getting your rig weighed. I've had mine weighed in each of the last two years and will be doing it again this summer...1st time was kinda sorta a baseline, the rest have been/will be to see the effects of mods I've added to my trailer (more batteries, additional furniture, an AC unit, solar panels) and to see if I've finally gotten the WDH bars adjusted correctly.

I'm fortunate that one of the local RV dealers has been paying the RVSEF fees and offering the weighins as a free service to the local RV community. But even if you have to pay yourself, I believe the fee is fairly reasonable...especially to get wheel by wheel weights with the rig hooked up and the tow vehicle by itself.

P.S. Check my photos for some pics of towing and camping at what Frank (fcatwo) refers to as "flying altitudes". :D

fcatwo
12-09-2004, 07:13 PM
The RVSEF web site is:http://www.rvsafety.org

TRDon
12-18-2004, 08:47 PM
Pulling a 3200lb boat and trailer, and OD locked out at 75mph, I got around 12 mpg.

pumpkinhead
01-26-2005, 08:24 PM
Ok, you guys pulling travel trailers, is anyone using mirror extensions? Anyone have a favorite brand?

RockyMtnRay
01-26-2005, 08:36 PM
Ok, you guys pulling travel trailers, is anyone using mirror extensions?
Yes, the stock Tundra mirrors do not provide nearly enough coverage to safely see behind a travel trailer.


Anyone have a favorite brand?

McKesh. Absolutely hands down the best. Nothing else even comes close for safety and effectiveness and lack of vibration. Kinda ugly, pretty pricey...but extremely effective and no vibration. Get the optional convex mirrors. Sold only online...buy them here (http://www.nosway.com/mckeshmirrors.html).

HockeyFreak
01-27-2005, 07:45 AM
Ray,

Isn't it a law that you have to have towing mirrors??? I believe they are required..

just a little aside, I'm not trying to hijack the thread....

budg
01-27-2005, 09:41 AM
I pull a fully loaded 22' travel trailer and a bed full of camping equipment 2200 miles round trip from Washington State to a youth rally in Colorado each summer. I'd estimate my total load at 5 thousand pounds. I've done as well as 12 MPG (70 MPH, AC off, little or no wind) and as poorly as 7 MPG (72 MPH, AC on, killer headwind, pedal to the metal just to hold 72 MPH). If conditions are good, I usually drive 75 which is the speed limit for most of the trip. I average about 10 MPG. Interestingly enough, leaving the AC off makes a noticable improvement in MPG. If I'm really stretching it between gas stops, I run with the AC off. It seems to make about 1-2 MPG difference.

My Tundra has plenty of power to haul all of that weight. I frequently pass other rigs that are just crawling up the passes. It handles really well too. Really, the gas mileage is the only bummer about towing with it. I'm working on a design for an auxiliary fuel tank with a transfer pump. That way, we can go more than 2 hours without stopping for gas. I'm hoping for enough capacity to go 3.5 hours between stops.

Verndog
01-27-2005, 08:48 PM
We're going to try and tow with our 4-runner next time, its a 2003 4runner sr5 2wd. I think it has the 283hp vvti iforce v8 in it, and the 5-speed tranny because it moves alot better then the tundra.


Huh?? They didn't even come out with VVTI until 05. And I don't believe they even had a V8 4runner in 03. It should be a 3.4L or 4.0L V6 IIRC. :confused: And I'll bet the Tundra tows better cause of the 5sp gearing and less torque in the 4runner.

mejones53
01-28-2005, 07:07 AM
The '03 & '04 4runner was available with a 4.7 liter V-8 235hp 320 lb-ft of torque DOHC 32 valve EFI. not the upgraded '05 version

bdavies
02-11-2005, 12:44 PM
I tow a ~5000# travel trailer with my `03 Tundra Access Cab (2WD, TRD off road, LSD, factory tow package) and get between 9.5 and 13MPG. I usually have one or more passengers, a box of firewood, plus other gear in the bed. the 9.5 MPG was average for a tank that included a lot of hill climbing and I have only seen a sub 10MPG tank on one occasion. I air up the rear tires on the truck a little more when towing and keep the trailer tires inflated to their max rating. I also run Mobil 1 in the Tundra. Last couple trips have all averaged 12MPG+. I typically try to maintain 62-65MPH - fast enough to keep the torque converter locked but not fast enough to attract too much resistance from the wind (or police for that matter). I have found that maintaining momentum, not speed leads to some pretty consistent and reasonable towing fuel economy.

Void
02-11-2005, 02:03 PM
Do I need an additional tranny cooler to tow a pop-up or Hi/Low type trailer given that they weigh less than 3000lbs. Never towed before, sorry if this is a dumb question.

Thx!

glennk
02-11-2005, 02:26 PM
Do I need an additional tranny cooler to tow a pop-up or Hi/Low type trailer given that they weigh less than 3000lbs. Never towed before, sorry if this is a dumb question.

Thx!

I wouldn't think so. I have pulled my 5400 lb boat from san diego to lake havasu with no issues. I've pulled it many places and have never had an issue. Just keep up on the maintenance and change that tranny fluid. In a busy summer i'll change it twice just to be safe.

KLS
02-11-2005, 02:52 PM
Do I need an additional tranny cooler to tow a pop-up or Hi/Low type trailer given that they weigh less than 3000lbs. Never towed before, sorry if this is a dumb question.

Thx!
Do you have the air-cooled transmission cooler that looks like a quarter-sized radiator in front of the truck's radiator? If not, I'd buy a B&M transmission cooler from summitracing.com, some 3/8" hydraulic hose from a local shop, invent a mount, and put that in.


Ken

Void
02-16-2005, 12:41 PM
Do you have the air-cooled transmission cooler that looks like a quarter-sized radiator in front of the truck's radiator? If not, I'd buy a B&M transmission cooler from summitracing.com, some 3/8" hydraulic hose from a local shop, invent a mount, and put that in.


Ken

Thanks for the replies :ts: . Yes, I have the little tranny cooler radiator that came with the tow package but I keep reading about people putting additional tranny coolers on their trucks and was just wondering if towing under half the maximum capacity would still neccesitate this.

Dave.

jay carter
02-20-2005, 07:08 PM
Hi. I get around 10 mph towing a 6500# 30 foot 5th wheel @ 60-65 mph. 2002 Double cab, V8. Anyone know how to get the 245 hp 4.7l to the 282 hp that the 2005 has? Thks. Jay

5thwheeler
02-24-2005, 01:11 PM
Thanks for the replies :ts: . Yes, I have the little tranny cooler radiator that came with the tow package but I keep reading about people putting additional tranny coolers on their trucks and was just wondering if towing under half the maximum capacity would still neccesitate this.

Dave.

They are inexpensive and worth every penny. Trannys cost a lot of coins so why take a chance.

wes 03
03-02-2005, 11:05 AM
hopefully will be going wheeling this weekend and will be towing an early bronco on a 16 ft trailer. will once again post up my milage numbers. we are guessing the bronco weighs anywhere from 2500 to 2700 since the top and doors are off, fiberglass hood, just the bare bones essentials! that makes my load around 4000 maybe a bit more. ill post up milage numbers sunday evening if we get it all together and go

wes

fcatwo
03-08-2005, 12:33 AM
13.1 down (87 octane) and 13.6 back (89 octane) on a 7,000 mile R/T from Seattle to Brownsville,Tx via San Diego towing a 3,200 lb http://TrailManor.com model 2619 at 60-70 MPH. Truck had 700 miles on the clock at start so it's possible it'll ease up to around 14 with more miles but not likely. It's an incredibly strong towing machine. I locked it out of O/D and I don't believe it shifted down a single time coming back north over some 6% climbs of several miles and up to 4200 ft. Just hit the bottom of the hill at 75 with good pedal and be willing to let it slow down to 60 or so and it won't even drop out of lock-up..... like driving a stick shift. A significant head wind changes everything however.

sleepyeddie
03-15-2005, 08:37 AM
What size is the hitch mount on the 2005 Tundra`s. Going to get a bike rack. And by the way if anyone knows where to get discount prices on Yakima bike racks it would be appreciated.

OMEGA JT
03-15-2005, 09:16 AM
I am buying a 6100 pound trailer that is 30 feet long. Can you really only go 55mph. And were also buying a lifted golf cart to get around. Can you have the tailgate while you are driving with the trailer hooked up. Thanks

rcdave
03-15-2005, 10:05 AM
What kind of trailer is it? Is that the fully loaded weight or just the weight of the trailer? If its a high and wide travel trailer your probably right at the limit of the GCWR. Do you have the D/C or A/C. The length of the trailer might be a little long versus the wheel base of the truck.

RockyMtnRay
03-15-2005, 10:22 AM
I am buying a 6100 pound trailer that is 30 feet long. Can you really only go 55mph. And were also buying a lifted golf cart to get around. Can you have the tailgate while you are driving with the trailer hooked up. Thanks
A "6100 lb", 30 foot long trailer will be a 7500 lb trailer once you load it. All Tundras have a Gross Combined Weight Rating of 11,800 lbs. A Tundra with options, gas, and 2 to 3 passengers plus a couple of hundred lbs of cargo will weigh between 5000 and 6000 lbs depending on the model. Subtracting that weight from the GCWR means the most the loaded trailer should ever weigh is 5800 to 6800 lbs. So before you ever even put the Golf Cart in the bed, you'll be anywhere from 700 to 1700 lbs over the design limits of your truck. :td:

A Golf Cart will weigh around 750 to 1000 lbs...add that to the tongue weight from the trailer and you'll be so far over your truck's frame, axle, and suspension limits that a broken axle or broken frame are exceedingly likely. :td: :td:

Furthermore, the widely accepted rule about trailer length is you need 4 inches of truck wheelbase above a 110 inch base for every foot of trailer over 20 feet. This rule is derived from studying 1000s of accident reports and analyzing what combinations of trailers and tow vehicles had a high probability of accidents, usually sway induced because the truck couldn't control the trailer. A 30 foot trailer computes to a 150 inch wheelbase truck. An Access cab Tundra has a 128 inch wheelbase; a Double Cab Tundra has a 140 inch wheelbase. Hooking a 30 foot trailer to any Tundra is a trailer sway accident waiting to happen. :td:

And no, you can't tow with the tailgate down...it will interfere with items (like propane tanks and jacks) that are mounted on the trailer tongue.

And yes, in California, the speed limit for towing is 55 or 60 mph. Other states have higher limits for towing.

Bottom line is the trailer you have in mind is way, way too heavy and long for your truck and there's no way you can possibly safely tow any sizeable trailer and carry a Golf Cart in the bed at the same time. What you want to do requires at least 1 ton rated truck....Ford F350 or Dodge/Chevy/GM 3500 series with a diesel engine.

OMEGA JT
03-15-2005, 01:24 PM
Ok it is a 2005 Keystone Cougar Travel Trailer. 6100 pounds is the trailer stock weight. We are buildign a drive way that is 11 feet wide, the trailer is about 8 feet wide and im not sure about the height. And yea your right. It will be b!tch towing with a tailgate down. Do any of you pull a trailer like mine. We were looking at a Ford, and a Dodge. But it is just going to be so expensive 75 grand for a truck and a trailer. Thats alot of money. And are truck is so brand new and so many miles the dealer is is giving us 10 grand less than the pay off. So were going to wait for a year. And i am suprised how expensize Golf Carts prices are. I had a 6 grad budget, found a damm good one. But they go up to 40-50 grand. Thanks for all your help guys

eallen62
03-16-2005, 07:20 AM
I have the same issue, Stopping every 130 miles makes for a very long trip. I drove from Indy to Shreveport with a 5th wheel & stopped 6 times for gas. Ave 8 MPG Overdrive off at about 65MPH. :cry:

OMEGA JT
03-16-2005, 09:23 AM
I have the same issue, Stopping every 130 miles makes for a very long trip. I drove from Indy to Shreveport with a 5th wheel & stopped 6 times for gas. Ave 8 MPG Overdrive off at about 65MPH. :cry:
Damm dude. what kind of trailer are you pulling with your tundra. whats the tow cap of your tundra also. ok man thats alot of stopping. But how is it going up a hill

eallen62
03-16-2005, 04:46 PM
Damm dude. what kind of trailer are you pulling with your tundra. whats the tow cap of your tundra also. ok man thats alot of stopping. But how is it going up a hill
I have a KZ Sportsman 23' 4500#. It the lightest 5th wheel on the market for it size. I read all the postings on weight & capacity, & another member had one. I found that it pulls great, good power, I had it up too about 85, with lots more peddle. Not a problem on hills, I have not been in the mountains but I am sure I would have to go a lot slower!!! I just want a bigger gas tank!!!! :) I'll add a picture of it to my PHOTO's.

OMEGA JT
03-16-2005, 07:07 PM
I have a KZ Sportsman 23' 4500#. It the lightest 5th wheel on the market for it size. I read all the postings on weight & capacity, & another member had one. I found that it pulls great, good power, I had it up too about 85, with lots more peddle. Not a problem on hills, I have not been in the mountains but I am sure I would have to go a lot slower!!! I just want a bigger gas tank!!!! :) I'll add a picture of it to my PHOTO's.
Ok wow. Thats a pretty nice trailer. Does it have a slide? Just wait till the new Toyota FTX is commign out, god I want that truck so much. So you can get up to 85, wow what state do you live in. I saw your tundra pulling you trailer. Looks nice too. Went to look at the trailer today. I am spending 35,000 and it dosent even come with a ladder, but they say it blocks the view for the rear lounge. Okey Dokey ill talk to you later then :ts:

fcatwo
03-16-2005, 07:11 PM
eallen62

I was going to suggest an auxillary tank in your bed with a transfer pump but after looking at your pictures I'm not sure you need anymore weight back there. Not a lot of choices otherwise.

rcdave
03-18-2005, 01:10 PM
Just thought I'd chime in here after reading about many other peep's experience in this area.

I had a 2000 SR5 4X4 Tundra Access Cab with the V8. I put 148,000 hard miles on it before trading it in on a new 2005 SR5 DC 4X4 with the 282HP V8 and the 5spd auto.

I towed various trailers with the 2000 Tundra ranging from a 21 foot big block powered jet boat weighing about 4,000 pounds to a 25 foot performance boat weighting 5,500 pounds dry. Also towed a few rented travel trailers ranging in size between 18 and 21 feet with wet weights approaching 5,000 pounds. I towed these trailers in various conditions from sea level all the way up to 8,500 feet all through the high Sierra's of California to the hotest desert areas towing boats up long grades in 110 + degree heat. This truck always performed great and never had a problem. Never overheated and handled these weights well. The steepest grades did require the use of 2nd gear turning 3,800rpm at 55 mph at about a 1/4 throttle. I never used O/D and relied on 3rd for the vast majority of towed miles. The tranny, engine, diffs held up great and never exhibited any problems. I used Mobil -1 synthetic fluids in the engine, tranny, diff's, and 4wd gear case.

The new 2005 Tundra has also really impressed me so far. The addition of the 5 speed tranny really is a significant improvement over the old 4 speed. Toyota did a great job spacing the extra gear that allows the 4.7L V8 to stay in its better workable power band for both towing and non-towing. Gone is that slight lag in the old tranny 2nd gear before the rev's come up. I just completed my first tow with this rig. I rented a 21 foot toy hauler that loaded was pretty close the the combined GCWR of the truck. It handled the weight better than I expected. 4th gear put the engine close to what the previous 3rd gear turned in RPM. The new 3rd gear really puts the Tundra in the sweet spot on grades. I could hold 3rd gear up 6% grades in the 55-60mph range at 3,700-,3900 rpm. It seems like at those rpm ranges the new VVTi engine has more torque than the old mill. As I also expected, towing doesn't put a dent in the water temps of the engine. I expect the tranny would be about the same.

Towing MPG is about the same in both rigs. The heavier weight trailers net me about 9-11 mpg depending on head winds and grades.

The only thing I wish the new 5 speed tranny had that it doesn't is for the torque converter to lock up in 3rd gear.

OMEGA JT
03-23-2005, 08:57 AM
Ok, we got it. Its parkd infront of our driveway. The tundra pulled with no problem. Felt a little bit in the peddles. But holy crap i didnt know that Elect Brakes works so good, i was suprised. Ill take a couple pictures and show it to you guys

OMEGA JT
03-24-2005, 04:08 PM
Does anyone know where i can get tow mirrors. I know camping world does. But anyone else

eallen62
03-24-2005, 04:13 PM
I got McKesh Portable Towing Mirrors from: http://www.hensleymfg.com/ They work great + they are removable. :D If you look at my Photo's I think you can see them on my truck. Only problem I had was that I did not get the bolts tight enough & had to stop & re-tighten them. But now that they are tight, I just mount them & go. I don't have to reposition the mirrors! :cool:
Here:http://www.tundrasolutions.com/photopost/showphoto.php/photo/25842/cat/500/page/1

IwantaTundra
03-25-2005, 11:16 PM
I'm using the VisionView Universal Towing Mirrors. They work for me, although the glass is a little small. I bought the wide angle glass for the right side and that helped out a lot. I like them because they go on and off in about 2 minutes and look a whole lot better than the McKesh door strap on things.

We just got back from another towing trial run (tying to get the sway control hitch set up right and I think I finally got it) so the trailer and mirrors are still on the truck. I'll see if I can get some pic's posted tomorrow. . .

wes 03
04-05-2005, 10:38 AM
got 10 mpg towing an early bronco weighing around 3000-3200 pounds on a 1500 pound trailer. going 70 mph and a few hills, did really well, i was a bit heavy on the tounge weight though

wes

NateSD
04-11-2005, 03:16 PM
Just got back from a road trip from Alamogordo, NM to Rapid City, SD and back again. 920 miles one way. 2003 AC V8 4X4. Didn't tow a thing on the way up and averaged 18.8 mpg bucking the wind most of the way and driving between 72-82 mph. On the way back, I had a 5X8 U-hual hooked on with about 1500lbs inside. U-hual said the trailer was close to 1000lbs empty. That's a grand total of a whopping 2500lbs :rolleyes: . Averaged around 14.5 mpg, some crosswinds, some tail winds and some head winds. Cruising around 65-75 mph most of the way using overdrive when I could (so not often since the trailer is as aero dynamic as a barn door). I would say that's not to bad for a V8. :tu:

UCstud
04-12-2005, 04:58 PM
Just got back from a road trip from Alamogordo, NM to Rapid City, SD and back again. 920 miles one way. 2003 AC V8 4X4. Didn't tow a thing on the way up and averaged 18.8 mpg bucking the wind most of the way and driving between 72-82 mph. On the way back, I had a 5X8 U-hual hooked on with about 1500lbs inside. U-hual said the trailer was close to 1000lbs empty. That's a grand total of a whopping 2500lbs :rolleyes: . Averaged around 14.5 mpg, some crosswinds, some tail winds and some head winds. Cruising around 65-75 mph most of the way using overdrive when I could (so not often since the trailer is as aero dynamic as a barn door). I would say that's not to bad for a V8. :tu:

Wow great mileage, 18.8 mpg highway is about what I get with a V6 taco. :confused:

NateSD
04-13-2005, 03:40 PM
The best single tank that I have ever had was 20.1 mpg! That was with a slight tail wind though. I do pretty well getting 17.1-17.6mpg daily driving.

ksallee
04-13-2005, 04:06 PM
I got 13.5 towing a 17' bass tracker. 05 DC 4x4

Seeinstripes
04-13-2005, 06:21 PM
Pulling single axle (5 X 8 ft), enclosed trailer @ 70 mph combo hills & flat: 11 mpg

Pulling 21ft Ski Boat @ 75 mph (in a hurry to get to the lake ;) ) I get about 13 mpg. (Boat is "slicker" in the airstream)

Pulling 24ft travel trailer @ 65 - 70 mph yielded about 9 mpg.

My F-150 got a little better mileage but I wouldn't go back to it if they gave it back to me ! :p

My Tundra:
* '04 D-Cab 4x4 SR5 (Black) with 22K (in 10 months, YIKES!)
* Put Shell Rotella Synthetic in at 1st change, and every 6K after.
* K&N Air filter
* Flowmaster 40 Series single 3" in, dual 2.5" out with stainless tips out the sides (looks cool, sounds great---too loud for you old farts though)
* Chrome Westin step tubes
* Front skid plate

The mileage:
Last week we made a 430 mile round trip on ONE tank - LOTS of hills (East Tennessee from Jefferson City thru Chattanooga to Tims Ford Reservoir-Winchester, TN and back to Jeff. Cty). Filled up at the same exact pump (morning and evening) and topped off the same # of times: 26.07 Gallons, $57.00, just an RCH under 17 MPG.

Next day we pulled a ~2,000 lb boat (pretty slick aerodynamically) for 180 miles, some city/accelerating, mostly interstate @ 80 MPH in Overdrive: 11.5 MPG.

Pretty consistent with everybody else. I am super happy with the truck. Gas here is 2.19 today (4/13/05).

alaska04
04-16-2005, 11:55 PM
In October of 04 me moved from Minneapolis to Anchorage, AK. I have a 2000 Tundra SR5 AC 4x4. We towed a 7 X 14ft Haulmark utility trailer that was pretty darn full. If my memory serves me correctly the worst we got was 8.5 mpg and the best was about 12.5 mpg. The first 3 days on pretty flat roads our avg. speed was 60-65mph. A lot of our driving on the Al-Can highway was right around 45-50 mph. I would say about 90% of the time I had the overdrive off. Unforturnately I have no idea what the total combine weight was. My estimate was between 4500-5000 pounds.

Anybody who has driven up the Al-Can in the winter pulling a trailer knows that its pretty darn slow. I also have to mention that about half way up here we ran into some ice fog. I was going up a hill when the truck down shifted, the tires lost traction and the back in broke loose. Before I knew it the trailer went to the right then to left and before I knew I had done a 180 and ened up facing the opposite direction on the other side of the road. The only damage was the the left rear quarter panel of the truck ($3000) and the corner of the trailer. I had visions of our trailer contents being spread out all over the highway.

So in a nutshell I guess 8.5 - 12.5 mpg.!!!!!!

antelope
04-18-2005, 11:17 PM
Pulled a 5x8 Eagle utility trailer across the Columbia Basin loaded but not heavy materials, mostly household items. Averaged a little over 14 mpg on relatively flat terrain, traveling 60-65.

54telluride
04-20-2005, 12:09 PM
My 05 Tundra DC 4x4 tows a 26' travel trailer. We recently went on a 1000 mile trip to southern Kentucky and averaged about 12 MPG for the whole trip. This included some steep grades to climb in Kentucky and a head wind for part of the trip home. Without the trailer I get 15-17 pretty regularly on my commute which is mostly highway.

denverbikeguy
07-21-2005, 03:33 PM
Ok granted I am in Colorado, so I am already at a power deficit trying to keep it at highway speeds. However air temperature really seems to make a difference! Going to La Junta last week, it was 100+. I got about 7-8mph average on the way down from Denver, which surprised me since I usually get much better mileage than that. On the way back, we waited until nighttime and the mileage nearly doubled *including gaining elevation on the way back*.

Now, whether some of this was from a heated engine compartment or not I dunno. A cold-air intake when the air temp is 100+ isn't going to do anything but suck in 100+ degree air, so it may just be a nature of the beast. However this truck seems kinda sensitive to air density/temp for whatever the reason. I was towing the same load both times, stock air filter, etc.

ericb
07-22-2005, 05:58 PM
What with all you guys getting 18 - 21 mpg. I have an '02' V8 and the only mods I've made is a K&N FIPK and TRD dual exhaust. I'm getting on average 12 -13 mpg:cry: I always drive in O/D, so what else could it be?

Both mods increased your high RPM power at the expense of the low end power, and low end is where the good mileage is.

Geodude
08-12-2005, 06:59 PM
As for a long-term tow, we're just back from four weeks on the road that took us from eastern Ontario, to the US west including Colorado (up to about 9000' towing), all over Wyoming and South Dakota. Trip total was 10,000kms, most of it towing.

We averaged 10.5mpg for the entire trip, running at about 60mph for the most part, if not slightly faster.

We were towing an Antigua 305QBS XLT travel trailer weighing in at 5200lbs (had it on the scales) that's 33' long from nose to spare tire, not including the Hensley Arrow.

rwidman
10-22-2005, 06:11 AM
I was always curious of this fact...aerodynamics of whatever is being pulled. Looking into the Honda Pilot, the salesman told me that it could pull more weight if it was a boat vice a camper/trailer. Don't remember the exact number, but it was something like 1000 lbs more. Seems a bit extra to me, but interesting based on the aerodynamics nonetheless.

The salesman is an idiot!:eek:

Towing capacity has nothing to do with the shape of the load, it's the weight that matters. Your vehicle's tow rating is based on weight.

The shape of the trailer and load will affect gas mileage, performance, and stability, but not the towing capacity of the tow vehicle.

Read the tow vehicle's manual, there is no mention of boat vs travel trailer, etc.

helica
10-22-2005, 10:52 AM
The salesman is an idiot!:eek:

Towing capacity has nothing to do with the shape of the load, it's the weight that matters. Your vehicle's tow rating is based on weight.

The shape of the trailer and load will affect gas mileage, performance, and stability, but not the towing capacity of the tow vehicle.

Read the tow vehicle's manual, there is no mention of boat vs travel trailer, etc.

Not disagreeing with you, but as far as physics is concerned, a less-aerodynamic load will have added wind resistance above and beyond that of the truck -- which increases overall trailer "weight" as observed by the truck's tow hitch.... (assuming it's a head-wind)

RockyMtnRay
10-22-2005, 09:11 PM
The salesman is an idiot!:eek:

Towing capacity has nothing to do with the shape of the load, it's the weight that matters. Your vehicle's tow rating is based on weight.

The shape of the trailer and load will affect gas mileage, performance, and stability, but not the towing capacity of the tow vehicle.

Read the tow vehicle's manual, there is no mention of boat vs travel trailer, etc.
The Honda salesman may or may not be an idiot...but in this case he was simply quoting what's in the Honda Pilot owner's manual. Specifically the Pilot allows towing up 4500 lbs if the tow is a boat but only 3500 lbs if it's a travel trailer. No explanation given though it's probably an aerodynamic consideration. People who have fairly heavy but low profile travel trailers (e.g. HiLo, TrailManor, some of the heavy Colemans) are rather perplexed by Honda's ratings...can they go up to 4500 lbs or must they stay with the 3500 lb limit. :confused:

Unlike the rest of the industry, Honda's tow ratings are at least sometimes based on having a typical load (whatever that is) in the tow vehicle instead of the standard method of using the most barebones, no pax, no cargo tow vehicle weight.

At least Toyota does it the standard way. :)

rwidman
10-23-2005, 07:09 AM
OK, if that's what the Honda manual states then fine, but it only applies to that model Honda and shouldn'd be confused with the towing specifications for other vehicles.

Certainly the aerodynamics of a boat trailer are different from those of a high profile box trailer and there will be less wind resistance at higher speeds. The shape of the trailer will have little effect on towing when accelerating from a stop or at low speeds and no effect at all on stopping ability. :eek:

mongrel
12-03-2005, 10:58 AM
05 Tundra 4L 6-speed, 2wd regular cab. (Only cost $15.7K total, new.)
21ft travel trailer, 4500lb loaded, with bedcap and some junk in bed. (All weight and towing capacity numbers legal, but maxed.)
Non-stop tow from New Mexico to South Carolina, via Interstate. These numbers were recorded between roughly Amarillo and Atlanta.
(Towing all over the country, including eastern and western mountains, 22K miles so far, this combination has served me well. But a limited slip, better tires, and maybe a lower gear would help it a lot.)

Speed miles/gallons = mpg
**********************
80mph 260/23.0 = 11.3
75mph 290/23.0 = 12.6
70mph 285/21.8 = 13.1
65mph 295/20.4 = 14.5
60mph ?/? = 15.5 (Didn't record the numbers)

M-bird
12-06-2005, 09:45 PM
V8 '04 Tundra towing an Open Steel diamondplate trailer and race car with a weekends' worth of gear/wheels/tools etc. - ~5000lbs -

11 mpg observed keeping a light foot on the gas, trying to keep momentum up and hanging around 65-70 mph.

Brian M
02-11-2006, 08:44 PM
Towing 5800 lbs travel trailer in '03 Sequoia. 8.2 mpg going. 9.4 coming home.

I-Force is gutsy.....but in this application, it is working hard for its money. ;)

Geodude
02-12-2006, 06:22 PM
We tow an Antigua 305QBS that's 32' long and weighs 5200 pounds on the road. In 15,000kms of towing last summer we averaged 10.5 MPG, including a trip from Ottawa out to Yellowstone and Colorado (Rocky Mountain National Park).

BTW, the Sequoia makes an excellent tow vehicle and that V8 iForce is a very capable motor. :tu:

Jetto Funk
02-16-2006, 09:20 PM
around 20 towing a 450 lb bike :\

Bamataco1
02-24-2006, 02:05 PM
I have a 05 Double Cab 4X4 yesterday I towed my car hauler. Unknow actual weight but it's a dual axle open trailer with a winch on the front and a battery to run the winch. On thew trailer was a Nissan Sentra. I got 14 mpg. Not bad at all I don't think. By the way I took my tailgate off and left it at home. Also the best that this truck has ever gotten with no load and no trailer is 17 MPG highway.

dubesrus
05-06-2008, 08:05 AM
2000 V8 Tundra, 2WD, extended cab with a shell on the bed... 118,900 miles
Only things not stock are: K&N filter, load range E tires 265-75-16 at 50 psi front and 60 psi rear, 10W40 Synthetic engine oil, synthetic lube in rear differential.

I typically get 19 to 20 mpg on interstate or state highways, either unloaded or with a load in the bed. I stay at the posted speed limit and use cruise control anytime possible.
I get 15 in short (4 to 10 miles) trips to and from town, but I drive mostly highway miles.

Towing a 4,000 lb aerodynamically shaped (Award) travel trailer, I usually get between 10 and 12. I am running at 55 to 65 mph depending on the state laws and terrain.

The biggest variables are the vehicle speed, and prevailing wind speed and direction.

I've achieved as little as 9 mpg at 55 mph against a 20 mph Kansas head wind. I've also made 13.7 mpg. running at 65 - 70 mph across Iowa with a steady 15 mph tail wind.

If I could just the transmission to hold together, I'd be happy... but that's another thread.

Regards

Blackdogs
05-10-2008, 07:44 PM
dubesrus is on the right track. Just got back from a 2500 mi trip. I managed 17.5 to 18.4 mpg on real gas going 61 mph pulling a 1000 lb boat trailer in OD with cruise on. Speed is the key to high mpg. Any faster than 61 and my 2005 DC starts getting very thirsty. This is going to make for longer but cheaper trips. I will be pulling a 3000 lb travel trailer this summer and will report back on mpg at 61 mph.

bignissan
05-20-2008, 05:50 PM
The salesman is an idiot!:eek:

Towing capacity has nothing to do with the shape of the load, it's the weight that matters. Your vehicle's tow rating is based on weight.

The shape of the trailer and load will affect gas mileage, performance, and stability, but not the towing capacity of the tow vehicle.

Read the tow vehicle's manual, there is no mention of boat vs travel trailer, etc.


Shape has a LOT to do with capacity...low speeds, no, but high speeds ABSOLUTLEY! Force due to wind is: F= area * V^2*.00256* drag coefficient. The drag coefficient for a "tube" for example, is 1.2, for a flat plate, is 2! So let's say F=1200 lbs for the tube, it will be 2000 lbs for the plate! Aerodynamics play a huge factor.

quarque
05-21-2008, 07:46 PM
Shape has a LOT to do with capacity...low speeds, no, but high speeds ABSOLUTLEY! Force due to wind is: F= area * V^2*.00256* drag coefficient. The drag coefficient for a "tube" for example, is 1.2, for a flat plate, is 2! So let's say F=1200 lbs for the tube, it will be 2000 lbs for the plate! Aerodynamics play a huge factor.
It appears this is a semantics issue. You are referring to something other than the quoted "towing capacity" used by manufacturers.

You make a valid point about the drag force though. The wind force on a trailer can be quite high at freeway speeds. More interesting though is the formula for the POWER to move an object through air is proportional to the CUBE of the velocity. 70 mph requires 8 times the power used at 35 mph just for the drag increase. :scared:

asianflava
05-22-2008, 10:15 AM
Just an interesting tidbit.

I have a 2WD V8 automatic Tundra, and typically get 18mpg, mostly highway - which I am very happy with.

I towed my car to a race a few months ago, on an open dual axle trailer, kind of like a flatbed truck with the car sitting open on the trailer. 3,000 pound car, 1,500 pound trailer, 4,500 pounds total. 10 hurs each way. And I got 14mpg. Fine. Well, pretty good, actually

Different truck, same trip, same results. I reset my mileage computer when I left and managed 14.1mpg from Marietta, GA to Palm Bay, FL. This was puling a 1700lb 16ft car hauler with a 4000lb car on top. I kept it between 65 and 70 the whole way. On the way back, I got 16.7 with just the empty trailer and going 70-75. Oh I didn't use the tow/haul mode, just normal drive.


All Tundras have a Gross Combined Weight Rating of 11,800 lbs.

07's and up have 16,000lbs GCWR

tomhole
05-22-2008, 08:56 PM
That post from Ray was made before there was a new Tundra (2005). In 2005, all Tundras had a GCWR of 11,800 lbs.

Tom

bignissan
05-23-2008, 12:07 PM
It appears this is a semantics issue. You are referring to something other than the quoted "towing capacity" used by manufacturers.

You make a valid point about the drag force though. The wind force on a trailer can be quite high at freeway speeds. More interesting though is the formula for the POWER to move an object through air is proportional to the CUBE of the velocity. 70 mph requires 8 times the power used at 35 mph just for the drag increase. :scared:

Very true, and in response to the POWER require to move the load through the air, comes back to force- drag included. The "capacity" is not excluding wind resistance, rather, it's based on a certain maximum frontal area..while there is a very gray area there, There will be a point where the trailer is just too large to move at speed. My 95 F-250 Powertroke manual, says maximum 60 sq. ft. frontal area for the trailer...

asianflava
05-23-2008, 12:27 PM
That post from Ray was made before there was a new Tundra (2005). In 2005, all Tundras had a GCWR of 11,800 lbs.

Tom

Geez, you're right, I didn't realize this thread was that old...2002 it's almost 6 years old!

mancheskia
09-28-2011, 11:23 AM
I have pulled a fair amount of farm equipment with my 2008 Tundra DBL Cab TRD Limited and at worst got 10.5 mpg that was with 25 ft pintel trailer (double axel with dually tires) and an older new holland LS 180 with oversized bucket. I do have a set of Air Lifter 5000 bags in the back that at the time was running 85 psi with no sag in the suspension at that psi. Was using the auto stick as well. Average speed was about 50 mpg. Best mileage I have got pulling or not pulling has been 19 mpg.

toy4x4boy
09-28-2011, 04:36 PM
10-12 mpg highway towing my 23' TT at 65-70 and I tow in S5. My old 2003 4Runner V8 got 9 mpg at 65 so I am pretty happy with what I am getting now.

BustaCapGains
10-03-2011, 05:03 PM
7-9mpg towing 27ft toy hauler between 9000-9500lbs loaded between 65mph-70mph. 2008 SR5 V8 4X4

2011tundrarockwarrio
10-17-2011, 12:49 PM
I just made a 2000 mile round trip towing my 32 foot passport travel trailer and got 8-9mpg, pretty decent I thought but now I'm gonna talk the wife into a supercharger lol