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: pulling out large shrubs with Tundra?



mollow
08-22-2006, 09:05 PM
I need to pull some Mugo Pine shrubs out and I'm wondering if I'd be able to do so with my Tundra. The pines are about 4 feet tall and 4 feet wide. The bases of each shrub are maybe 3 or 4 inches wide, but I'm not sure how extensive the roots are.
Has anyone used their Tundra for a similar job and can it work?

riuz426
08-22-2006, 09:19 PM
Unfortunatley, I can pretty much assure you that your tundra will not be able to do this job. My brother and I tried to pull some similar shrubs from the front of my house with his F-250 diesel 4x4 and all we could do was spin all four wheels. Even trying to jerk the bushes out didnt work. Supprisingly it takes an extreme amount of force to accomplish this task. Luckily he owns a bobcat and we were able to uproot the bushes using it. But i would not recomend using your truck as it may cause damage to the drivetrain and or the frame.

vision guy
08-22-2006, 09:33 PM
I've pulled out several junipers with my '03 Tundra. I have an '06 D.C. now and and never tried to do the same as of yet. I can't imagine that it would be that difficult. The junipers were mature plants, approx 3ft tall x 2ft wide. I securely attatched a chain to the "front" hook, put it in 4 low and slowly backed away. They came out with very little difficulty. I've seen people try this by trying to attatch a long chain to the rear bumper and getting a running start and "jerking " the truck with little success. I can see how you may damage something like that. I'd try it slowly as I described. Good Luck!

figit
08-22-2006, 10:00 PM
It will depend on the soil and depth of the roots. Don't use a chain, make sure you have a cable. I've seen broken chains darn near kill people when they break.

I remember b4 getting my pickup tearing out some shrubs with my 4 banger Mitsu Mirage at half time of a bears game. I just kept thinking: you might be a redneck if...

cupidstoy
08-22-2006, 10:19 PM
ok, lots of bad advice so far.

first, never use a chain or a cable. use a tow strap with a blanket thrown over the center so if it does give way, it will not snap back at the truck.

second, don't let any bystanders within range.

if you do it from the front, some folks recommend raising the hood to deflect any thing coming at the driver position.

i have not had much luck pulling stumps or shrubs with my truck. my usual approach is to use the rear hitch and "GENTLY" tug to see if i can budge them. the problem is normally that i can't pull UP, but only sideways. i usually have more luck with our old ford tractor and blade because i can use the hydraulics on the rear hitch to generate some upward force at the same time i pull sideways.

what generally seems to happen is if the tree/shrub is small enough, the trunk breaks off before the roots give way. if it's big enough for the trunk not to break, the roots aren't going to give either.

it helps to really soak the soil well before any attempts. if your ground is as hard and clay filled as ours right now, forget about it.

you may also have to dig around them a bit and cut some side roots with an ax.

don't risk damaging yourself or your nice vehicle on this menial job. do the prep work and then just use the truck to pop the shrubs easily, or forget about it and do it all by hand or hire someone with heavier equipment.

sormi
08-23-2006, 01:02 AM
All the above advice is good. Make sure there are NO people around in case something snaps. I pulled one out with my 4x4 surburban. Another thing you can try is tieing the cable at the base of the trunk then running it over the top of a large old wheel. This gives it the effect of pulling the root stright up and not at an angle. If you manage to get it up several inches stop and lower the strap.. That's how I got one bear of a root out. Also at times I was spining a four wheels and hopping around. It was kind of fun..

42GAMI
08-23-2006, 03:27 AM
http://www.tundrasolutions.com/photopost/showphoto.php/photo/25399/what/allfields/name/atrdnut/name/atrdnut/mcats/all

shall36
08-23-2006, 04:42 AM
I've pulled out many bushes and shrubs. The soil here in Florida is fairly soft, so it's not like these things are rooted in clay or anything. If it doesn't come easy at first, a little run of things usually does the trick.

ICON
08-23-2006, 05:17 AM
I guess there's only one way to find out. I don't think you'll have any trouble popping those suckers out of the ground since pine roots really don't go very deep. Use 4Low and a heavy chain, strap, cable or whatever but make sure it's strong enough. I pulled a 6'x4' shrub a couple months ago and it came out very easy. Just took out the slack in the chain, gave it just a little gas and out she came. My brother and i were amazed at how easy it came out, we figured we'd need to dig, cut the roots and pry it but didn't need to. Worse case you might need to pry the roots w/a 6' pry bar to loosen them up.

DJ
08-23-2006, 07:32 AM
Whether you use a truck, tractor, or cat, the procedure is the same:

1) Soak the ground. You'll be breaking the ground apart, and soft ground breaks much more easily than hard ground. A few hours of soaking can make a huge difference in how easy it comes out, and it can save your drive train.

2) Get a wheel. Buy a steel wheel, the bigger the better, from a salvage yard. It's cheap, because it can be rusted, bent, dinged, or otherwise unusable.

3) Use the wheel. Roll it up to the trunk. Wrap a chain around the trunk at ground level (or below), bring it straight up, then once around the wheel, then horizontally over to the vehicle you'll pull with. Take up the slack, making sure the wheel is still rolled right up to the trunk.

4) Pull. The wheel translates the horizontal pull from the vehicle into a vertical pull at the trunk. It'll pull the tree straight up, breaking the soft ground as it goes.

Been there, done that. I'll be doing it again as soon as the heat breaks, as I repair my stockade fence. A recent storm included a downburst right over my back yard, blowing out 14 sections of fence, and breaking the posts off at the ground. I'll drive 1/2 x 12 lag screws into the stump of each post, hook a chain onto the screw, and pull them out using this method.

And, I'll use a tractor, not a Tundra.

shall36
08-23-2006, 07:45 AM
This is a totally out there side note. I was watching something on Discovery or the History Channel or something about the land clearing techniques used in colonial times. To uproot large trees, once they were cut down, a large derrick type rig was built and wheeled over to the tree stump. The rig uses a log running horizontally on the derrick and around which a rope is wrapped. The other end of the rope goes around the trunk. The log is turned via large levers and the trunk is pulled out vertically with a large amount of force. Pretty neat.

So the previous post about the steel wheel sure makes lots of sense!

randyeverett
08-23-2006, 08:04 AM
Whether you use a truck, tractor, or cat, the procedure is the same:

1) Soak the ground. You'll be breaking the ground apart, and soft ground breaks much more easily than hard ground. A few hours of soaking can make a huge difference in how easy it comes out, and it can save your drive train.

2) Get a wheel. Buy a steel wheel, the bigger the better, from a salvage yard. It's cheap, because it can be rusted, bent, dinged, or otherwise unusable.

3) Use the wheel. Roll it up to the trunk. Wrap a chain around the trunk at ground level (or below), bring it straight up, then once around the wheel, then horizontally over to the vehicle you'll pull with. Take up the slack, making sure the wheel is still rolled right up to the trunk.

4) Pull. The wheel translates the horizontal pull from the vehicle into a vertical pull at the trunk. It'll pull the tree straight up, breaking the soft ground as it goes.

Been there, done that. I'll be doing it again as soon as the heat breaks, as I repair my stockade fence. A recent storm included a downburst right over my back yard, blowing out 14 sections of fence, and breaking the posts off at the ground. I'll drive 1/2 x 12 lag screws into the stump of each post, hook a chain onto the screw, and pull them out using this method.

And, I'll use a tractor, not a Tundra.

Good advice DJ..... thanks. Never heard about the wheel adjunct. I'll get to try it this fall with some nasty "thorn" bushes in our front yard.
Will my Tundra do a better job jerking out shrubs if it has a K&N air filter? :devil:

RE

Hickleberry
08-23-2006, 10:49 AM
The K&N will help at first, giving the engine a mighty roar, then when the dust starts to fly, it will get sucked through the filter with little resistance, then your engine will be full of dust. lol

Schly
08-23-2006, 10:58 AM
Also, instead of a tow strap, get a yank strap that has some stretch to it. It will give you a little extra pull.


Worth repeating: DO NOT USE CHAIN OR CABLE!

mollow
08-23-2006, 11:18 AM
thanks everyone.

DCTUNDRA
08-23-2006, 06:15 PM
If a large diameter wheel is not available (think semi truck wheel), then you can screw a couple of 2x10's about 4 ft long together (making a 4x10). At one end cut a "V" shaped groove to act as a "cable guide" for your strap. Place this device near your bush and run the strap from the base of the bush, up over the 4x10, and out to your vehicle. The board should be inclined somewhat towards the bush so that as the strap is pulled, the board will leverage up an over center. Exact amount of inclination and optimal placement of the board is obtained by trial and error. Once you have done it, or seen it done, it is pretty straight-forward.

DJ
08-23-2006, 06:43 PM
Don't take the notion of a "big wheel" too seriously. I didn't mean a semi-truck wheel or such, I simply meant don't use something like a small boat trailer wheel. Mine is an ordinary 14" steel wheel from a Volvo 240 DL.

With this method, it doesn't take much "oomph" to pull something like a fence post set in concrete. It's actually surprisingly anticlimactic. If you have to yell "Charge!" and play General Custer at it, then you need to soak the ground some more. If you're in danger of breaking a chain, then you REALLY need to cut some roots and such first.

It's sort of like painting a wall. Pushing the roller is easy, fast, and anticlimactic, but only because you've prepared the wall first. Don't adopt the motto "there's never time to do it right, but always time to do it again".

Mafix
08-24-2006, 08:10 AM
I helped my dad haul a couple of larger bushes out of the front yard. Tied a rope around the tree to the back of the truck. Put tension on it, and then pulled forward enough to tear it out.

Ground here is hard clay. The ball of roots that came up with each plant were about 2 feet in diameter and 1 1/2 foot thick.

How are ya'll having such a hard time? We used a Dodge Ram 2500 4x4. Never even turned on 4 wheel drive. Just yanked them out.

wingnut337
08-24-2006, 08:38 AM
DO NOT use a snatch rope or Yank Strap as someone previously mentioned. Yes it has stretch and will absorb sudden stops from snatching. But stretch a rubber band until it breaks and tell me if it feels good. Unfortunatly I cant get pics of my Dads old tail gate to post on here and show you the aftermath. For the best info Refer to CUPIDSTOY's post

Bamataco1
08-24-2006, 01:23 PM
You would be amazed at the trees I have pulled out with my Tundra. I cut them short so they wouldn't fall over onto the truck first. But they were about twenty feet tall before I cut them. If you have heavy enough chain it will work so will a tow strap I have never used cable. The thing that most people do wrong is to have their truck to far away from what you want to pull. I learned that froma a farmer. And he was absolutely right. You want to be close thrre or four feet away at most. If you have 4 wheel drive use 4 low. Keep people clear so that they won't get hurt if something goes wrong.

Cascadia
08-25-2006, 04:21 PM
Pulled out some large Junipers with my 4X4 Tundra. Hooked a chain around them and to the tow reciever. I didn't want to jerk them out so I tried it slowly. I had the truck in two wheel drive and the rear tires started to slip. Put 'er in 4 Wheel drive and they came out easily.

senixon
08-07-2007, 12:05 PM
I know this is old but just wanted to add my story to the list...

Pulled over a dozen bushes/small trees out of my front yard with my 2WD SR5 V8, using a large tow strap (5+ ton rating)...

The key for me was to cut them to about 6-8" stump, dig around it a little, shift the truck in LOW, drive very slowly. I had only a couple stubborn ones that made my tires spin, but all but one came out. The one that I wasn't able to pull out broke off in the ground and the root hit my bed lid (nice big dent now), I left it open after that one.

dsrtrcr01
08-07-2007, 12:36 PM
I need to pull some Mugo Pine shrubs out and I'm wondering if I'd be able to do so with my Tundra. The pines are about 4 feet tall and 4 feet wide. The bases of each shrub are maybe 3 or 4 inches wide, but I'm not sure how extensive the roots are.
Has anyone used their Tundra for a similar job and can it work?
I pulled out this tree with no issues at all. Only re hooked the chain once. Roots and all. All that was left were small roots which I pulled up by hand. Get the ground nice and wet around them to loosen the soil

http://www.tundrasolutions.com/photopost/data/986/medium/Front.JPG

http://i170.photobucket.com/albums/u280/dsrtrcr01/smallgrass1.jpg

Oh yeah and those bigger bushes were removed using the tundra as well.

blane64
08-07-2007, 12:55 PM
Hmm...I have pulled some large shrubs/crepe myrtles with my old Explorer and more recently my riding mower....My trick is to use a chain saw to cut around the bushes first, severing many of the roots, no matter how large. Yes, it is rather hard on the chain, but they only cost $15 at Home Depot....works like a charm, and makes an impressive amount of dust and noise!

boosted3g
08-07-2007, 06:56 PM
Hi guys this is my first post here and i gotta say i love the site. Ive had an 87 and an 88 toyota pickup, 2 97 4runners and last week i got my 01 tundra limited. I guess i keep moving up in the world.

Anyways i have pulled out a 10 inch diameter maple tree with my 4runner and the trick is the rigging involved. Take a sawzall and cut a v notch in the top of the trunk. The choke a root at the base of the stump and with your strap go in the groove on the top of the stump and to your receiver. Its as easy at that. Just give it a few nice tugs. Dont let a lot of slack in the strap just enough to lunge forward a little. No drag race launches. If you keep bumping it after a few tugs youll see it loosening.

bradtown
08-08-2007, 07:20 PM
Hell No..........drop a c note and rent a piece of equipment for half the day.

rcbuzzb
08-08-2007, 11:30 PM
Good thread, very informative.

I had to help someone pull shrubs out of a ('This won't wreck my bricks will it?') fancy planter bed. A high-lift jack got them out easily and safely enough.

blane64
08-09-2007, 06:24 AM
Good thread, very informative.

I had to help someone pull shrubs out of a ('This won't wreck my bricks will it?') fancy planter bed. A high-lift jack got them out easily and safely enough.
Oh, but where's the fun in THAT?

t-MAX
08-09-2007, 06:34 AM
i have done it with my old 94 t-100, with a cable. best results is do not wrap cable completly around the bottom, run the cable through part of the bush at the bottom then start jerking it will break lose

hikeside
08-09-2007, 12:20 PM
I can tell you a trick I did on my shrubs. I got the ground really wet and let it soak in overnight. Then I borrowed a very large bumper jack. I just wrapped a chain around them then slowly jacked them out. I would alternate sides and dig around them with a shuvel some as I jacked. Yes, it is more work but beats the heck out of ruining your tranny, differential, or even your hitch. Was not that bad really and was easier then digging holes for my fence to be honest......

05TundraDC
08-09-2007, 01:31 PM
Wow. Interesting info.

I have absolutely no experience with pulling out shrubs with a large truck, but just from watching Mel Gibson pull the foundation/stilts out from under a house in "Leathal Weapon 2", I would've assumed that shrubs would be no big deal....

This is obvious, but I guess you can't believe everything you see in the movies... Sure looked real enough to me when I saw the movie though...

whitsend
08-10-2007, 07:14 AM
I saw a video today that made me think of this tread.

Idiot's Guide to Removing a Basketball Hoop and other Just Plain Stupid Videos on StupidVideos.com (http://www.stupidvideos.com/video/just_plain_stupid/Idiots_Guide_to_Removing_a_Basketball_Hoop_1/)

:eek: Idiots.

Cian
08-10-2007, 08:44 AM
Wow. Interesting info.

I have absolutely no experience with pulling out shrubs with a large truck, but just from watching Mel Gibson pull the foundation/stilts out from under a house in "Leathal Weapon 2", I would've assumed that shrubs would be no big deal.... LOL! I remember that. Good movie, btw.

But didn't he have an HD diesel with a dually setup? Plus a crazy look in his eye?

05TundraDC
08-10-2007, 10:24 AM
LOL! I remember that. Good movie, btw.

But didn't he have an HD diesel with a dually setup? Plus a crazy look in his eye?

Cian,

Haha. So are you saying then that shrubs would be no big deal with an HD diesel with a dually setup?? Maybe Mel/Lethal Weapon could get the shrubs out with only a Tundra and that crazy look in his eye....

dyogim
08-10-2007, 10:54 AM
I too have pulled juniper bushes out, some with 5" - 7" bases. What helps is to loosen the dirt around the base if the first try doesn't do it. After each try, loosen the dirt deeper. Until eventually it comes out.

If your tires spin, stop. Try giving a little slack and try yacking it out. Use a tow strap, not chains or cables. If after each try it doesn't come out, loosen the dirt more.