Timing belt replacement FSM extract [Archive] - Toyota Tundra Forums : Tundra Solutions Forum

: Timing belt replacement FSM extract



shall36
10-03-2006, 03:55 PM
Here's the FSM instructions on replacing the Timing Belt.

Tones
10-07-2006, 11:40 AM
Great post. Thanks for sharing this.

cupidstoy
10-07-2006, 10:05 PM
yep, thanks a ton. it's tucked safely away on the ol' hard drive for a rainy couple of days in the future when the odometer is gettin' close to 90k....

jackbauer
10-03-2007, 11:27 AM
do you guys think this would be really close to being the same for a 4.7 in a 03 4runner??

HotRod8
10-03-2007, 05:30 PM
I was reading through the procedure, I am wondering if you really need to take off all of what it says in the FSM. For example, radiator, camshaft timing pulleys, crankshaft timing pulley, etc. Can someone who has done this job comment? Also, they list a whole bunch of special tools (SSTs) what have others used in place of the pullers, holding tools for the cam pulley, crank pulley, etc.?
I am still on the fence as to whether to tackle this myself or get the dealer to do it. Mine is a ways off yet, but might have to start getting the tools into the budget.:D

DJ
10-03-2007, 07:11 PM
I was reading through the procedure, I am wondering if you really need to take off all of what it says in the FSM. For example, radiator, camshaft timing pulleys, crankshaft timing pulley, etc. Can someone who has done this job comment? Also, they list a whole bunch of special tools (SSTs) what have others used in place of the pullers, holding tools for the cam pulley, crank pulley, etc.?
I am still on the fence as to whether to tackle this myself or get the dealer to do it. Mine is a ways off yet, but might have to start getting the tools into the budget.:DBeen there, done that.

I suggest you read this thread from start to finish:

http://www.tundrasolutions.com/forums/1gen-tundra/76803-timing-belt/

You need to do almost all of what it says, but you don't need to remove the camshaft sprockets. The crankshaft sprocket will slide off the crankshaft quite easily; just give it a pull. You should clean behind it and inspect the front main seal, assuming you don't intend to replace the seal.

I highly recommend getting two special tools. They are:
09213-70011 Crankshaft Pulley Holder
09330-00021 Companion Flange Holding Tool
They are made by SPX and can be purchased from ToolSource.com as
SKU 99091 $89.95
SKU 97504 $62.95
respectively. They make it easy and safe to remove, reinstall, and properly torque the bolt that holds the cranskshaft pulley on.

KFlash
10-04-2007, 07:49 AM
Guys - I'm right there with you. I have 86,500 on mine and am hoping to get through till early spring. I'd love to tackle this job myself, but it's just the fear of the unknown - did I do this right, did I do that right? It is probably fairly easy and is one of those things you just have to get into and realize it's more cumbersome by the many steps rather than technical skill. My only battle is weighing what my time is worth now. The dealer could bang it out in a couple hours, where I'd probably be in it for two days and several trips back to the dealer for gaskets/parts - who knows!

Charlie and Titan
10-04-2007, 11:20 AM
Depends on your level of mechanical skill. I'm 1/2 way through mine (stalled because parts people sent me the wrong crank seal).

If you have a good parts list and the FSM, plus a good collection of hand tools, you should be all set.

The special tooks would be dandy, but I haven't NEEDED any of them yet. The ones I'd like most are the crank holder and the adjustable pin wrench, but you can do without if you have scrap belts (which you will) and a long enough chain wrench.

You'll want a 3 arm gear puller (drive belt pulley) and a gasket scraper (to clean up the water pump to thermostat housing) - other than that, it is normal sockets and wrenches. Have a good selection and you're set.

Don't forget the two o-rings (one at the back of the water pump and one on the thermostat neck), a thermostat, a thermostat gasket, FIPG and toyota red coolant on your parts list.

Cam (x2) and crank seals (x1) are supposedly optional, but I don't see why you'd do a job like this and not replace them - seems penny wise, pound foolish.

If you can get it done at a dealer for $800, and the job they do includes waterpump, all new seals and o-rings, it is probably worth it. Depends upon what your opportunity cost on that time is.

My timing belt and water pump looked dandy, not really needed, but I don't want to get stranded on a long trip I'm taking, so doing it is cheap insurance. I bet a service station in the middle of nowhere wouldn't do as good a job and it would cost a lot more than the job I am doing. It is just good peace of mind to have it done.

I've got ~$500 in parts into mine (all genuine toyota from a sponsor).

I was hearing $1600 estimates, so the do-it-yourself was very attractive to me...

Charlie

DJ
10-04-2007, 11:21 AM
It was not a difficult job. Every single step of it was easy, and the way to tackle it is the same way one eats an elephant; one bite at a time. The thread I referenced shows all the parts you'll need.

So, do it or don't do it, at your pleasure, but you need not be intimidated by it.

diller1
10-10-2007, 10:58 AM
I just did mine last week. I have 125,000 miles and have put it off for a year. The belt looked I fine, the water pump had a small coolant leak into the timing cover so it was good to repair this. The job went well. I used a Chilton manual. It took about 10 hours over two days but I took my time and verified every step in detail. I did not change the cam or crank seals but had them on hand if needed. I had to get a chain wrench to hold the pulley to loosen the crank nut. I'd say do it yourself if you have the basic tools.

tundraboy27909
11-16-2007, 12:15 PM
I have been looking for this information forever. Thanks.

BaW
01-03-2008, 07:49 PM
THANk you guys for posting this !!!!!! if you where girls i would take you out to dinner then to a movie then i hope we can go home and have some fun!!!

KFlash
01-19-2008, 07:33 AM
What can I use in place of the pin spanner wrench. I do see a spanner wrench set on ebay, but if not replacing the seals, will something else work to relieve the tension on the cam sprockets for removal/installation.

I am getting ready to head to the dealership for all the parts. Now all it needs to do is warm up a little.

ctbale
01-19-2008, 09:23 PM
you can turn the cams by hand, but its hard. I used a large pair of pliars with rubber handles. put the rubber handles in the "spokes" of the cam sprokets, then use a large screw driver or pry bar to turn the pliars/sprokets, a little primitive, but works. but like I said, with leather gloves, you can turn the cams.

I just inspected seals, I would not replace unless leaking. same with tensioner

http://www.lexls.com/tutorials/engine/timingbelt.html

almost same moter as lexus, but tundra does not have distibuters, or coils that shows in these pictures. I used a new chiltons manual. VERY HELPFULL!

DirtyErnie
12-08-2008, 07:46 PM
Hi everyone...new to this forum, but could use some help if you are kind enough to offer it.

I am in the process of changing the timing belt in my 2002 Tundra (V-6) and ran into a little problem. This is my first stab at this and want to make sure I do it right. I do not have much money to spare, so taking it to a true mechanic is not an option.

I am in the process of puting on the new timing belt. It has the same numbers on it as the old timing belt. The new timing belt has the marks for the cam shifts and the crank shaft.

I started by making sure the marks on the cam shaft pulleys were at "noon" as per the repair manual and the crankshaft gear marking was at noon BEFORE I removed the old timing belt.

I took the new timing belt and aligned the left and right cam position marks on the belt with the marks on the cam shaft pulleys (again, at noon position).

Next I wrapped the timing belt around the coolant pump pulley and routed the timing belt around the crankshaft pulley.

I installed the tensioner to the lower take-up pulley and was pleased with the tension and meshing of belt teeth to all pulleys.

I proceeded to rotate the crankshaft clockwise with a breaker bar. When I achieved TDC, the marks for the cam pulleys were exactly one tooth off. The position of the belt markings in relation to the "noon" location was presisely one tooth to the right of where the cam pulleys should be.

I think I did smoething wrong and would appreciate your input on the matter because I can simply not afford a mechanic or to be out of a vehicle for getting me back and forth to work.

I also replaced the water pump, thermostat, both take-up pulleys and the hydraulic tensioner as I do not want to do this again (or at least for another 6 years...lol). Yes, I verified the part numbers and actually measured the diameters of the new pulleys to make sure that I would not run into any complications. I also purchased new belts for the compressor, power steering and alternator. Got all parts for $250.00 at autopartsworld.com.

The original cause for me to change the timing belt (as well as the aforementioned items) is that the upper take-up pulley (factiry original) had failed (bearings were rolling around inside dust cover) which caused enough slack on the timing belt to stop driving the impeller on the water pump (overheating and a terrible noise under the hood).

The original timing belt is okay as well as all the timing belt sprockets and crankshaft gear. I really got lucky and consider myself fortunate that more damage was not realized.

Now if my luck would only stay good so I may receive your input as to how the hell I correct the alignment of the timing belt. Manual tells me to re-install the belt (they are serious, but it sounds like a no-brainer to me...JUST HOW DO I MAKE SURE I DO NOT REPEAT THE SAME MISTAKE?

Please help my pitiful soul get my truck back on the road so I can go to work and feed my family. Thank you and God bless. (crossing fingers)

DirtyErnie
12-08-2008, 08:01 PM
What can I use in place of the pin spanner wrench. I do see a spanner wrench set on ebay, but if not replacing the seals, will something else work to relieve the tension on the cam sprockets for removal/installation.

I am getting ready to head to the dealership for all the parts. Now all it needs to do is warm up a little.

Use a pair of channel lock type pliers on the cam pulleys.
Use a chain wrench and breaker bar for the crankshaft pulley...this is a pain to get off.

Specialty tools are handy, but basic tools can get you by.

I'm doing mine in the freezing cold.

Save the money you would spend on the specialty tools and get a heater to have by you as you work...plan on ten to fifteen hours of your life...or pay a "mechanic" to replace the parts.

zlathim
01-06-2009, 02:12 PM
I changed my timing belt and water pump last Saturday. Here is a write up I did on another site. I thought I would post it here too.
I purchased a timing belt kit on e-bay from a seller named volkstoy. I had heard good things about the kits, so I bought one. It included the t-belt, water pump, gaskets, t-belt tensioner pulley, t-belt idler pulley, cam seals and crank seal(I did not replace the cam or crank seals because mine were not leaking), serpentine belt, along with a gasket and o-ring for the water inlet assembly, which is mounted atop the water pump. The belts are made by Bando, and the w/p and bearings are GMB. The set costs $230 and the shipping is free. Here is the set (minus the cam seals and crank seal):

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v117/canoe/tundra%20Timing%20Belt/IMG_2835.jpg

I have a Chilton's manual that I used for reference, even though I have done many t-belts on various other makes and models. A Toyota FSM would undoudtable be better, but the Chilton's was actually pretty complete. Be sure to have a manual before you start this job because it is pretty involved. Basic hand tools are needed for this job. Most of the fasteners are of the 10mm, 12mm, and 14mm variety. I used my 1/2 impact to loosen the crank bolt, and I needed to use my harmonic balancer/steering wheel puller to get the crank pulley off.

First, I removed the skid plate and drained the radiator. Then I removed the air intake tube, fan shroud, and radiator, then the fan itself. After that stuff is removed, you can start to see what you are up against to get the timing components removed:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v117/canoe/tundra%20Timing%20Belt/IMG_2827.jpg

Now it is time to start removing the timing belt covers and all the other stuff that is in the way. First, I removed the right side timing cover, the smaller timing cover next to it, and the serp belt idler pulley (all references to right and left are from the perspective of sitting in the driver's seat, and are completely opposite of how it looks when looking at the engine from standing in front of it. This is how my Chilton's manual is, so I have kept with that same orientation to avoid confusion for someone referencing this post and their manual simultaneously).

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v117/canoe/tundra%20Timing%20Belt/IMG_2830.jpg

Then it was time to work on the left side timing cover. As shown in the following picture, there is more stuff to remove in order to get this side off. There is a coolant tube that goes from the water pump and tees off to the throttle body and down to the oil cooler (have a pan ready because even though the radiator is empty, there is a bunch of coolant waiting to spew forth once the lower end of that tube is removed). There is also a wire lead (for the cam sensor)coming through a grommeted hole in the cover on this side that needs to be dealt with. Here is how it looks:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v117/canoe/tundra%20Timing%20Belt/IMG_2828.jpg

And with the coolant pipe and that cover removed:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v117/canoe/tundra%20Timing%20Belt/IMG_2831.jpg

Next I removed the fan bracket. The a/c compressor mount ties into this bracket, so I found it necessary to remove two bolts holding the a/c compressor to the fan bracket.

On the other side, I removed the serp belt tensioning pulley assembly. The alternator must be removed in order to get it off. In order to get the alternator off, one needs to remove the power steering pump. The p/s pump is removed by pulling two bolts and a nut from the front of the pump; there are holes in the pulley, so you can even acces them with a socket. Pull the p/s pump off (lay it to the front with the hoses till attached), then you can remove the alternator and lay it down below. There is no need to remove the wires, just move it enough so that it is out of the way. Then I put the p/s pump back in place and loosly started the bolts and nut. It was not in the way of anything I needed to do after removing the alt. After that is done the tensioner assy comes right off.

At this point I rotated the engine around to TDC on cyl#1. I insured that I was on the compression stroke by looking at the now exposed timing marks on the camshaft sprockets. On each side of the backing plate behind the cam sprocket there is a vertical mark and a "T". The vertical mark is TDC and the "T" is a mark you will use while installing the belt. You can see the marks on the pictures above.

When that was done, I used my impact with a 22mm socket to remove the crank pulley bolt. At this point I should mention that this can be the single most frustrating part of this job if you don't have the right tools. The bolt is pretty tight, comparatively speaking. An impact will usually just zip it right off, but it is much harder to do with a breaker bar because the engine wants to turn instead of the bolt loosening. Usually you have to hold the pulley with a special pulley holding tool, or a chain wrench wrapped around the pulley. It can be a RPITA, so be prepared to mess with it a bit if you have never removed a crankshaft bolt. There is another method which uses a breaker bar up against the frame and bumping the starter. I don't do it this way because it has the potential to be dangerous and damaging. IF YOU DO DECIDE TO DO IT THIS WAY, DISABLE THE IGNITION SYSTEM SO THE ENGINE WILL NOT START WHILE "BUMPING THE STARTER".

With the bolt out, I used my harmonic balancer pulley to get the pulley off (you can borrow or rent a puller from many auto parts stores):

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v117/canoe/tundra%20Timing%20Belt/IMG_2832.jpg

Now it was time to remove the small cover around the crankshaft, and you can see that the belt and water pump are next:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v117/canoe/tundra%20Timing%20Belt/IMG_2834.jpg

First the t-belt. I removed the t-belt tensioner by removing the two bolts that hold it on. It is seperate from the tensioner pulley and with it removed there is no tension on the pulley and belt. I didn't get any pics of that process, but the belt comes right off after that. The I removed the t-belt tensioner pulley and the idler pully.

Now I still had the water inlet housing attached to the w/p as seen in the above pictures. It comes off by removing the two bolts angling downward from the top. It has a silicone seal and an o-ring holding it together and mine was tough to get off. I finally had to nudge it with a rubber mallet to get it freed up enough to twist it back and forthe enough to wiggle it off. The o-ring bore is a tight fit and makes it feel like you forgot to remove a bolt or something. When it is off it looks like this:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v117/canoe/tundra%20Timing%20Belt/IMG_2836.jpg

Now you can remove the w/p. Keep track of where all of the bolts and studs go. You will notice that you removed one of the bolts earlier when you removed the small cover. The rest of them are small bolts or studs which have the nuts already removed during prior disassebly of the tensioner pulley and the fan bracket. Have your drain pan positioned under the w/p because it is a gusher. Here is what it looks like when it is off:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v117/canoe/tundra%20Timing%20Belt/IMG_2837.jpg

When I got my belt and pulley off, I noticed a couple of things. First, the belt looked like it was still in fairly decent shape, with no obvious areas of concern. I know some people have tempted fate and ran them for many miles over what I did. My w/p was a different story. I could see some pink concretions under the pulley and at the weep hole that were casued by coolant leakage. Slight leakage, but leakage non-the-less. This crumby picture shows what I am talking about, sorry it it so blurry:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v117/canoe/tundra%20Timing%20Belt/IMG_2841.jpg

I imagine that if I had neglected to do this preventative maintenance, the water pump would have sprung a serious leak sometime in the near future. I'm sure it would have failed and required teardown before the timing belt broke anyway, if I had not performed this repair. If I had decided to just do the t-belt and not mess with the w/p, I would have been tearing it all apart again to replace the w/p. obviously, this is why it is best to get it all in one shot, and the extra expense is worth it. I got lazy and elected not to replace the crankshaft and camshaft seals. They were completely leak free, so I decided to let sleeping dogs lie. I hope it doesn't come back to bite me!

Next I cleaned the gasket surface and installed the w/p and gasket with black RTV. Then I installed the new idler and tensioner pullies. Now for the belt.

I mentioned earlier that I have replaced t-belts on a number of different makes and models. Many of them have little tricks and techniques to get everything all set up correctly, and this one is no different. I recommend reading and re-reading your manual before you start setting up the cam timing because it is a critical step.

It is easiest to do this if you have an extra arm extending from the center of your chest, but if not, a frind can help you hold the t-belt while you get it all lined up and indexed. The process on this engine goes as follows:

The new timing belt should have marks on it that correspond to the marks on the cam sprockets and the crank sprocket. The references are from sitting in the drivers seat, so they are reversed from the way you are looking at it and that can get confusing. Make sure that the crank is at TDC by referencing a groove on the upper side of the crank sprocket and a raised dimple on the oil pump housing( I regretfully didn't get a good pic of that mark, but you will see it and understand immediately). Start by positioning the left cam sprocket (on your right side) at the "T" position and then install the belt so the line on the belt matches up with the line on the sprocket. Have a helper hold the belt on the cam sprocket so it does not move, then route the belt onto the crank sprocket so that the line on the belt is in line with the dot on the lower side (this is not the crank TDC reference I mentioned above. It is a seperate mark which can be seen on the lower side front of the crank sprocket). Only those two sprockets are engaged with the belt at this point. Now you need to use a 17mm wrench on the cam sprocket and gently rotate the mark on the sprocket so it lines up with the straight line on the backing plate. That will take up all the slack in the belt between the cam sprocket and the crank sprocket. You can now position the right side (again, it is on your left) cam sprocket on the "T" mark and finish routing the t-belt onto it and around the tensioner and idler. Make sure the line on the belt is lined up with the mark on the sprocket, then gently rotate the cam sprocket so that the mark on it lines up with the straight line on the backing plate. That will put tension on the belt between the two cam sprockets and conveniently put all the slack on the side of the belt adjacent to the tensioner.

A few words about the tensioner. When I removed mine, I tested it by trying to push the now extended rod back into the body by holding it against my bench vise and leaning my body weight against it. It didn't budge and therefore appeared to be satisfactory. Then I had to get it ready to reinstall. I forgot to get pics of this process as well, but it is in the manual. I placed the tensioner in my vice so that when I turned the handle it would compress the shaft into the body. There is a hole in the shaft that lines up with a hole in the tensioner body when compressed. I inserted a small nail in the hole to hold the shaft in the body until assembly. I then bolted the tensioner onto the bracket and pulled the nail out which allows the tensioner to apply tension to the belt. It looked like this when I was all done. The tensioner is barely seen on the bottom left of the photo. The shaft pushes straight up on the tensioner pulley assenbly.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v117/canoe/tundra%20Timing%20Belt/IMG_2839.jpg

After I made sure the marks were all lined up properly, I temporarily reinstalled the crankshaft bolt and used a 22mm socket on a ratchet to rotate the engine two complete revolutions. This should bring everything back into place for a quick double check of the cam timing. The notch and bump on the crank pulley are in place and the mark on the cam sprockets are lined up with the straight lines on the backing plates. The lines on the belt are no longer in place, but that is normal and not a point of concern. They are there as a reference for installation only, and as long as the marks on the sprockets themselves line up all is well.

Now it is just a matter of doing all of the teardown steps in reverse order until it is all back together. I lubed the o-ring on the water inlet housing with antifreeze in order to get it to go back together smoothly, and every thing buttoned back up nicely. I filled it with Toyota red antifreeze, changed the oil just because and started it up. As with other Yota pickups, the Tundra is kind of tricky to get the air pocket out of the heater core (burped). I had the Tundra running (heater on full blast)with the radiator cap off on my inclined driveway, but ended up jacking the front of the truck up another foot in order to get it to burp. You can tell when it burps because it will start spewing air and hot coolant out of the radiator filler and the air will finally star to feel warm coming out of the vents. When all of the air is burped out, you can finish filling the radiator and you are done.

The finished product-ready for many more miles of trouble free service:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v117/canoe/tundra%20Timing%20Belt/IMG_2844.jpg

kbl41001
01-10-2009, 10:13 AM
I changed my timing belt and water pump last Saturday. Here is a write up I did on another site. I thought I would post it here too.
I purchased a timing belt kit on e-bay from a seller named volkstoy. I had heard good things about the kits, so I bought one. It included the t-belt, water pump, gaskets, t-belt tensioner pulley, t-belt idler pulley, cam seals and crank seal(I did not replace the cam or crank seals because mine were not leaking), serpentine belt, along with a gasket and o-ring for the water inlet assembly, which is mounted atop the water pump. The belts are made by Bando, and the w/p and bearings are GMB. The set costs $230 and the shipping is free. Here is the set (minus the cam seals and crank seal):

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v117/canoe/tundra%20Timing%20Belt/IMG_2835.jpg

I have a Chilton's manual that I used for reference, even though I have done many t-belts on various other makes and models. A Toyota FSM would undoudtable be better, but the Chilton's was actually pretty complete. Be sure to have a manual before you start this job because it is pretty involved. Basic hand tools are needed for this job. Most of the fasteners are of the 10mm, 12mm, and 14mm variety. I used my 1/2 impact to loosen the crank bolt, and I needed to use my harmonic balancer/steering wheel puller to get the crank pulley off.

First, I removed the skid plate and drained the radiator. Then I removed the air intake tube, fan shroud, and radiator, then the fan itself. After that stuff is removed, you can start to see what you are up against to get the timing components removed:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v117/canoe/tundra%20Timing%20Belt/IMG_2827.jpg

Now it is time to start removing the timing belt covers and all the other stuff that is in the way. First, I removed the right side timing cover, the smaller timing cover next to it, and the serp belt idler pulley (all references to right and left are from the perspective of sitting in the driver's seat, and are completely opposite of how it looks when looking at the engine from standing in front of it. This is how my Chilton's manual is, so I have kept with that same orientation to avoid confusion for someone referencing this post and their manual simultaneously).

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v117/canoe/tundra%20Timing%20Belt/IMG_2830.jpg

Then it was time to work on the left side timing cover. As shown in the following picture, there is more stuff to remove in order to get this side off. There is a coolant tube that goes from the water pump and tees off to the throttle body and down to the oil cooler (have a pan ready because even though the radiator is empty, there is a bunch of coolant waiting to spew forth once the lower end of that tube is removed). There is also a wire lead (for the cam sensor)coming through a grommeted hole in the cover on this side that needs to be dealt with. Here is how it looks:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v117/canoe/tundra%20Timing%20Belt/IMG_2828.jpg

And with the coolant pipe and that cover removed:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v117/canoe/tundra%20Timing%20Belt/IMG_2831.jpg

Next I removed the fan bracket. The a/c compressor mount ties into this bracket, so I found it necessary to remove two bolts holding the a/c compressor to the fan bracket.

On the other side, I removed the serp belt tensioning pulley assembly. The alternator must be removed in order to get it off. In order to get the alternator off, one needs to remove the power steering pump. The p/s pump is removed by pulling two bolts and a nut from the front of the pump; there are holes in the pulley, so you can even acces them with a socket. Pull the p/s pump off (lay it to the front with the hoses till attached), then you can remove the alternator and lay it down below. There is no need to remove the wires, just move it enough so that it is out of the way. Then I put the p/s pump back in place and loosly started the bolts and nut. It was not in the way of anything I needed to do after removing the alt. After that is done the tensioner assy comes right off.

At this point I rotated the engine around to TDC on cyl#1. I insured that I was on the compression stroke by looking at the now exposed timing marks on the camshaft sprockets. On each side of the backing plate behind the cam sprocket there is a vertical mark and a "T". The vertical mark is TDC and the "T" is a mark you will use while installing the belt. You can see the marks on the pictures above.

When that was done, I used my impact with a 22mm socket to remove the crank pulley bolt. At this point I should mention that this can be the single most frustrating part of this job if you don't have the right tools. The bolt is pretty tight, comparatively speaking. An impact will usually just zip it right off, but it is much harder to do with a breaker bar because the engine wants to turn instead of the bolt loosening. Usually you have to hold the pulley with a special pulley holding tool, or a chain wrench wrapped around the pulley. It can be a RPITA, so be prepared to mess with it a bit if you have never removed a crankshaft bolt. There is another method which uses a breaker bar up against the frame and bumping the starter. I don't do it this way because it has the potential to be dangerous and damaging. IF YOU DO DECIDE TO DO IT THIS WAY, DISABLE THE IGNITION SYSTEM SO THE ENGINE WILL NOT START WHILE "BUMPING THE STARTER".

With the bolt out, I used my harmonic balancer pulley to get the pulley off (you can borrow or rent a puller from many auto parts stores):

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v117/canoe/tundra%20Timing%20Belt/IMG_2832.jpg

Now it was time to remove the small cover around the crankshaft, and you can see that the belt and water pump are next:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v117/canoe/tundra%20Timing%20Belt/IMG_2834.jpg

First the t-belt. I removed the t-belt tensioner by removing the two bolts that hold it on. It is seperate from the tensioner pulley and with it removed there is no tension on the pulley and belt. I didn't get any pics of that process, but the belt comes right off after that. The I removed the t-belt tensioner pulley and the idler pully.

Now I still had the water inlet housing attached to the w/p as seen in the above pictures. It comes off by removing the two bolts angling downward from the top. It has a silicone seal and an o-ring holding it together and mine was tough to get off. I finally had to nudge it with a rubber mallet to get it freed up enough to twist it back and forthe enough to wiggle it off. The o-ring bore is a tight fit and makes it feel like you forgot to remove a bolt or something. When it is off it looks like this:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v117/canoe/tundra%20Timing%20Belt/IMG_2836.jpg

Now you can remove the w/p. Keep track of where all of the bolts and studs go. You will notice that you removed one of the bolts earlier when you removed the small cover. The rest of them are small bolts or studs which have the nuts already removed during prior disassebly of the tensioner pulley and the fan bracket. Have your drain pan positioned under the w/p because it is a gusher. Here is what it looks like when it is off:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v117/canoe/tundra%20Timing%20Belt/IMG_2837.jpg

When I got my belt and pulley off, I noticed a couple of things. First, the belt looked like it was still in fairly decent shape, with no obvious areas of concern. I know some people have tempted fate and ran them for many miles over what I did. My w/p was a different story. I could see some pink concretions under the pulley and at the weep hole that were casued by coolant leakage. Slight leakage, but leakage non-the-less. This crumby picture shows what I am talking about, sorry it it so blurry:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v117/canoe/tundra%20Timing%20Belt/IMG_2841.jpg

I imagine that if I had neglected to do this preventative maintenance, the water pump would have sprung a serious leak sometime in the near future. I'm sure it would have failed and required teardown before the timing belt broke anyway, if I had not performed this repair. If I had decided to just do the t-belt and not mess with the w/p, I would have been tearing it all apart again to replace the w/p. obviously, this is why it is best to get it all in one shot, and the extra expense is worth it. I got lazy and elected not to replace the crankshaft and camshaft seals. They were completely leak free, so I decided to let sleeping dogs lie. I hope it doesn't come back to bite me!

Next I cleaned the gasket surface and installed the w/p and gasket with black RTV. Then I installed the new idler and tensioner pullies. Now for the belt.

I mentioned earlier that I have replaced t-belts on a number of different makes and models. Many of them have little tricks and techniques to get everything all set up correctly, and this one is no different. I recommend reading and re-reading your manual before you start setting up the cam timing because it is a critical step.

It is easiest to do this if you have an extra arm extending from the center of your chest, but if not, a frind can help you hold the t-belt while you get it all lined up and indexed. The process on this engine goes as follows:

The new timing belt should have marks on it that correspond to the marks on the cam sprockets and the crank sprocket. The references are from sitting in the drivers seat, so they are reversed from the way you are looking at it and that can get confusing. Make sure that the crank is at TDC by referencing a groove on the upper side of the crank sprocket and a raised dimple on the oil pump housing( I regretfully didn't get a good pic of that mark, but you will see it and understand immediately). Start by positioning the left cam sprocket (on your right side) at the "T" position and then install the belt so the line on the belt matches up with the line on the sprocket. Have a helper hold the belt on the cam sprocket so it does not move, then route the belt onto the crank sprocket so that the line on the belt is in line with the dot on the lower side (this is not the crank TDC reference I mentioned above. It is a seperate mark which can be seen on the lower side front of the crank sprocket). Only those two sprockets are engaged with the belt at this point. Now you need to use a 17mm wrench on the cam sprocket and gently rotate the mark on the sprocket so it lines up with the straight line on the backing plate. That will take up all the slack in the belt between the cam sprocket and the crank sprocket. You can now position the right side (again, it is on your left) cam sprocket on the "T" mark and finish routing the t-belt onto it and around the tensioner and idler. Make sure the line on the belt is lined up with the mark on the sprocket, then gently rotate the cam sprocket so that the mark on it lines up with the straight line on the backing plate. That will put tension on the belt between the two cam sprockets and conveniently put all the slack on the side of the belt adjacent to the tensioner.

A few words about the tensioner. When I removed mine, I tested it by trying to push the now extended rod back into the body by holding it against my bench vise and leaning my body weight against it. It didn't budge and therefore appeared to be satisfactory. Then I had to get it ready to reinstall. I forgot to get pics of this process as well, but it is in the manual. I placed the tensioner in my vice so that when I turned the handle it would compress the shaft into the body. There is a hole in the shaft that lines up with a hole in the tensioner body when compressed. I inserted a small nail in the hole to hold the shaft in the body until assembly. I then bolted the tensioner onto the bracket and pulled the nail out which allows the tensioner to apply tension to the belt. It looked like this when I was all done. The tensioner is barely seen on the bottom left of the photo. The shaft pushes straight up on the tensioner pulley assenbly.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v117/canoe/tundra%20Timing%20Belt/IMG_2839.jpg

After I made sure the marks were all lined up properly, I temporarily reinstalled the crankshaft bolt and used a 22mm socket on a ratchet to rotate the engine two complete revolutions. This should bring everything back into place for a quick double check of the cam timing. The notch and bump on the crank pulley are in place and the mark on the cam sprockets are lined up with the straight lines on the backing plates. The lines on the belt are no longer in place, but that is normal and not a point of concern. They are there as a reference for installation only, and as long as the marks on the sprockets themselves line up all is well.

Now it is just a matter of doing all of the teardown steps in reverse order until it is all back together. I lubed the o-ring on the water inlet housing with antifreeze in order to get it to go back together smoothly, and every thing buttoned back up nicely. I filled it with Toyota red antifreeze, changed the oil just because and started it up. As with other Yota pickups, the Tundra is kind of tricky to get the air pocket out of the heater core (burped). I had the Tundra running (heater on full blast)with the radiator cap off on my inclined driveway, but ended up jacking the front of the truck up another foot in order to get it to burp. You can tell when it burps because it will start spewing air and hot coolant out of the radiator filler and the air will finally star to feel warm coming out of the vents. When all of the air is burped out, you can finish filling the radiator and you are done.

The finished product-ready for many more miles of trouble free service:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v117/canoe/tundra%20Timing%20Belt/IMG_2844.jpg

Great write up. I did this muself this last spring, I did only the belt, water pump thermostat, coolant, plugs, and so on, for about the same price it runs great, and would do it again for someone anytime.

Kevin.

zlathim
01-16-2009, 07:07 AM
Thanks for the kind words! I'm glad to hear you got yours done too. Replacing that waterpump was a smart move. I think mine was about to spring a serious leak.

ctopher_hudson
01-19-2009, 08:35 AM
Great write up! i think i will wait until it warms up a bit more before tackling this project. An Kevin- was it REALLY necessary to qoute that ENTIRE post, just to say good job?

zlathim
01-21-2009, 06:55 AM
Great write up! i think i will wait until it warms up a bit more before tackling this project. An Kevin- was it REALLY necessary to qoute that ENTIRE post, just to say good job?

Thanks! I hope this can be of some help when you tear yours apart. Cheers!

dyogim
01-23-2009, 09:25 PM
Thanks for the kind words! I'm glad to hear you got yours done too. Replacing that waterpump was a smart move. I think mine was about to spring a serious leak.

You mean like this?!?! I'm in the process of changing my belt and water pump. Here's what I found and the leak looks to be coming from behind the water pump pulley. Also, here's the home made tool I used to help remove the crank pulley bolt.

http://www.tundrasolutions.com/forums/members/dyogim/albums/engine++drivtrain-358/leak-looks-originating-behind-water-pump-9618.jpg
http://www.tundrasolutions.com/forums/members/dyogim/albums/engine++drivtrain-358/evidence-of-leak-not-lookin-great-9616.jpg
http://www.tundrasolutions.com/forums/picture.php?albumid=358&pictureid=9615

I used the holes with a couple of 8mm bolts to bolt to the pulley. The two other prongs were used by the person who originally made the tool.

Great write-up!!!!

kbl41001
01-24-2009, 11:28 AM
Chudson,

It was not require that copy the whole post I just had one of those days and hit the wrong button Sorry.

adeshon
03-28-2009, 11:24 PM
I just completed changing my timing belt with 121k+ miles. This post was particularly helpful, so I decided to share my results here. Following is a summary of what I did and the things I would advise anyone to think about before attempting this:

- First of all, follow the FSM extract from this thread! This was my bible for performing this task and took all of the guess work out.
- Need something to hold crank while loosening / tightening harmonic balancer. I used a self-tensioning belt-type oil filter wrench against the drive belt tensioner (hey, it works!)
- Didn't pull cam pulleys. Didn't see any leaks so I decided against changing seals.
- Didn't change crank seal either. Again, no leaks.
- Changed water pump. There was some evidence the water pump was leaking and didn't want to take any chances.
- Compressed tensioner (with some help from a machinist at work) and used a 5/64" allen wrench to align holes. This step is necessary!!
- Installing thermostat housing... Make sure to apply a liberal amount of liquid soap / water on the o-ring before installing and verify that the housing and water pump flanges mate properly (I used a mirror). If they aren't flush, the housing is not installed all the way! I did this first before installing the FIPG on the flange. Okay, I did this after I had a major leak.

This cost about $500 and about 10-12 hours of my time. If you have some basic hand tools, some time, and this FSM extract, there is no reason you can't do this yourself!

Thank you to all who took the time to post their knowledge and tips here. I've used it countless times!

zlathim
05-14-2009, 12:08 PM
[QUOTE=adeshon;1238416- Didn't pull cam pulleys. Didn't see any leaks so I decided against changing seals.
- Didn't change crank seal either. Again, no leaks.
[/QUOTE]

I didn't change the seals either. I hope I don't regret it!

Alligatorgar
09-11-2009, 01:30 PM
Zalathim That is some seriously dirty brake fluid. I use russell speed bleeders. They work great and its a one man job. Russell Performance - Import Speed Bleeders (http://www.russellperformance.com/mc/speed/import.shtml)

Thanks guys I will be using your experience when I get to 100,000 miles. My 02 only has 70,000 miles now.

Hobbes
09-18-2009, 01:33 PM
Does anyone replace radiator hoses when doing the timing belt or simply put the old ones back on (assuming they pass a visual inspection)? I'm creating my parts list but haven't seen any mention of actually replacing the hoses.

I have an '02 but only 62k miles and figure that I will tackle this soon. Only 2/3 to the magic mileage number but a year past the time limit - figure I've already been flirting with fate.

Thanks.

waiting tundra
09-20-2009, 08:32 AM
IMHO I'd change the hoses if they've never been changed. The hoses can look new, but if there original's they are weak, time for a replacement 7 years old. It makes it rough especialy after spending all the money on the water pump, timing belt tensioners, seals ,thermostat & other misc. expenses but what the heck I'd even change the serpintine belt that way it's all done & over with.

Alligatorgar
09-20-2009, 07:53 PM
Hobbs I have 70,000 on my 02 tundra and need this done by 100,000 also. Where do you live? Id like to see someone else do this tear down before I brave it. FYI just changed my serp belt. The gatorback by good year was my choice of belt. Its very quiet and no more squeaks.

Hobbes
09-24-2009, 05:40 AM
Alligatorgar - I live in Austin, TX (assuming the user filled out the info, you can see their location under "My Details" in the header of each post). I've thought about posting both here and in the Texas region forum to see if there are others around here who would want to do this together. A coworker of mine is a very experienced mechanics (side job for him now) and my current plan is to do it in his driveway. He's never done a timing belt on a Tundra, but has on many other vehicles. He's my insurance policy :D.

Question for those that have done a timing belt - the kit from Volkstoy on ebay and everyone else posting in these threads mentions replacing the tensioner pulley and the idler pulley. I've seen another thread that mentions replacing both idler pulleys (post #11 here http://www.tundrasolutions.com/forums/1gen-tundra/132231-timing-belt/). From the attached image below from the FSM (page EM-13), which idler pulley do most people replace? No.1 Idler or No.2 Idler? Also, I just recently purchased a Gatorback belt and volkstoy said he'd omit the serpentine belt from his kit and will knock $20 off the price - thought that was great on his part.

rlehan
09-24-2009, 11:21 AM
I can't find the volkstoy kit on ebay right now, but when I bought that kit it included both idler pulleys. If you want to replace the tensioner pulley you will need to get that from Toyota probably. Some people just replace the hydraulic tensioner and not the whole tensioner pulley assembly. I replaced everything when I did mine earlier this year (including the upper and lower radiator hoses). If you haven't done it before you should give yourself a full weekend to complete the job. It's not hard, but you do have to remove a lot of stuff to get it done. I recommend taking lots of digital pictures as you go and maybe take some notes too so you don't have problems when you put everything back together. The special crankshaft pulley holding tool makes the job a lot easier too.

Alligatorgar
10-08-2009, 06:50 PM
Yes hobbs after I posted I noticed you were from Austin. Im going to have to do this on my own the ppl in my neighbor hood trade in their autos/trucks before the need for timing belts. I'm feeling like the lone ranger. HEHE I intend on studying all these post and then write up my own tear down rebuild sheet for me to follow. I dont know anything about bando belts so Im more than likely going to go oe or goodyear/gates.

fish4stripers
11-16-2010, 10:53 AM
Awesome writeup! Just bought a 2001 Sequoia and need to change the belt. Does anyone know the p/n of that small hose described in this line as a coolant tube? "There is a coolant tube that goes from the water pump and tees off to the throttle body and down to the oil cooler (have a pan ready because even though the radiator is empty, there is a bunch of coolant waiting to spew forth once the lower end of that tube is removed)"

Is it a pre-formed hose or can you use standard heater hose?

Also does anyone know of a OEM p/n lookup by diagrams site online?

Thanks, Jeff

fish4stripers
11-29-2010, 09:20 AM
Did my timing belt this wkend thanks to this writeup and other tips here. No special tools bought, used a chain wrench and piece of Serpentine belt wrapped around harmonic pulley. 20" chain wrench from Harbor Freight for $5 was a tiny bit too short. Bought another one and took a few links off one and added to the other to make it long enough to use. Used a 6" c-clamp to compress tensioner also.

uncle ernie
07-20-2011, 04:42 PM
Really glad to see this thread, I recently bought a used 2001 SR5 with 173,000 mi and will probably attempt the belt replacement after the heat of this summer subsides, and i can work outside without too much trouble, not having a dedicated shop or garage.
I do have some mechanical experience, and appreciate everyones input and suggestions to tackle it.

c4yourself2
09-23-2011, 07:21 PM
Just read the whole thread, great job all, time to order the parts off of flea bag I guess. Trucked just turned 91k so it's time to tackle this. I need to check the owner's manual, I think I need to change the tranny fluid also...

Chuck