Weight in Truck Bed for Winter Traction - Page 2

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Thread: Weight in Truck Bed for Winter Traction

  1. #16
    Junior Member drewbush's Avatar
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    Default Re: Weight in Truck Bed for Winter Traction


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    Default Re: Weight in Truck Bed for Winter Traction

    Quote Originally Posted by pdmted View Post
    Someone had posted about the rear end always going to the right. I appologize for doing this, but this is the engineer geek in me coming out. Torque always creates a force in one direction. No matter how you weight the car, even with a true solid rear axle, the rear will go right, its just physics. I wont go into a long explination, but it has nothing to do with weight, your lsd, or more power going to any one wheel. It is just the natural force created by the torque.....
    Sounds good, I just kicked out my 2005 Tundra TRD Sport Stepside and kissed the divider making a left hand turn. Heading out for some sandbags pronto! If the truck torque causes it to kick out to the right, is there a preference on which wheel should carry the most sandbags?
    Larry -Fremont, Ca

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    Cool Re: Weight in Truck Bed for Winter Traction

    As a few others have metioned, w/ a 4x4 you probably don't need anything, though physics does suggest it will improve traction (not the same thing as handling or control, of course). A while back someone posted this site...they sell a bladder that secures in your bed. You fill it with water, adding weight to your bed. You can put stuff on top of it as it is designed to allow you to still use your bed. In the spring I guess you could "re-use" the water on your lawn or landscaping.

    Here's the URL: shurtrax added truck weight for better truck traction

    If you get one, let us know how it goes.

    Shannon

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    Default Re: Weight in Truck Bed for Winter Traction

    I have an Extendo-Bed mounted in the back of my 2005 d-cab 2wd. It added appox. 410 lbs to the rear of the truck. Makes a differance here in Northern NY during the winter.

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    Default Re: Weight in Truck Bed for Winter Traction

    Quote Originally Posted by DITBOY View Post
    As a few others have metioned, w/ a 4x4 you probably don't need anything, though physics does suggest it will improve traction (not the same thing as handling or control, of course). A while back someone posted this site...they sell a bladder that secures in your bed. You fill it with water, adding weight to your bed. You can put stuff on top of it as it is designed to allow you to still use your bed. In the spring I guess you could "re-use" the water on your lawn or landscaping.

    Here's the URL: shurtrax added truck weight for better truck traction

    If you get one, let us know how it goes.

    Shannon
    That's what I've got and it works great .
    2003 2WD Tundra Imperial Jade TRD offroad
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    Default Re: Weight in Truck Bed for Winter Traction

    Quote Originally Posted by student's tundra View Post
    That's what I've got and it works great .
    Up here in AK it gets in the low teens and lower quite often. I am lucky enough to park in my garage but wonder how a water filled bladder would work with the shifting from freezing to warmer temperatures. Wouldn't the water shift around making the truck unstable?

    I bought 4 sandbags and they improved my traction. For $20 it was the cheapest solution. I hope to buy a Canopy and that should solve the problem for next year. Not sure any vehicle is really that good on solid ice, that is wear caution and 4WD are your best bets.

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    Default Re: Weight in Truck Bed for Winter Traction

    My first car/truck was a El Camino (rear wheel drive) - Great for picking up chicks !!! O.K., not really. It was a hand-me-down from my Dad that smelled like cutting oil, a welding booth and GPC cigarettes. That thing did over 250,000 miles in Chicagoland, of which a fair bit was early morning (roads not yet cleared) winter/snow/sleet driving.

    He used a homemade 3/16th ish thick rectangular plate of steel with four "tabs" welded on each corner. The plate was approx 2' x 3.5' (just long enough to lay between the wheel wells resting flat on the bed. The tabs were positioned snuggly against the front & back of each wheel well keeping it securely in place. It worked really well being directly over the axle, kept the bed 99.9% fucnctional and only needed some touch-up painting once a year to inhibit rust.

    If you wanted to be really slick you could have a plate of steel plasma cut to the exact dims you want / need and then have it coated with Rhino Bed-liner. The Rhino liner will keep if from rusting and slipping.

    Tyler

  9. #23
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    Default Re: Weight in Truck Bed for Winter Traction

    Quote Originally Posted by T23 View Post
    Up here in AK it gets in the low teens and lower quite often. I am lucky enough to park in my garage but wonder how a water filled bladder would work with the shifting from freezing to warmer temperatures. Wouldn't the water shift around making the truck unstable?

    I bought 4 sandbags and they improved my traction. For $20 it was the cheapest solution. I hope to buy a Canopy and that should solve the problem for next year. Not sure any vehicle is really that good on solid ice, that is wear caution and 4WD are your best bets.
    No, because it has chambers built inside to prevent shifting of the water inside.
    2003 2WD Tundra Imperial Jade TRD offroad
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    285/75/16 BFG A/T and 16x8 KMC Black Enduro's
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    ATS sports grille (Awaiting paint and install)
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  10. #24
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    Default Re: Weight in Truck Bed for Winter Traction

    Quote Originally Posted by Tytanium View Post
    My first car/truck was a El Camino (rear wheel drive) - Great for picking up chicks !!! O.K., not really. It was a hand-me-down from my Dad that smelled like cutting oil, a welding booth and GPC cigarettes. That thing did over 250,000 miles in Chicagoland, of which a fair bit was early morning (roads not yet cleared) winter/snow/sleet driving.

    He used a homemade 3/16th ish thick rectangular plate of steel with four "tabs" welded on each corner. The plate was approx 2' x 3.5' (just long enough to lay between the wheel wells resting flat on the bed. The tabs were positioned snuggly against the front & back of each wheel well keeping it securely in place. It worked really well being directly over the axle, kept the bed 99.9% fucnctional and only needed some touch-up painting once a year to inhibit rust.

    If you wanted to be really slick you could have a plate of steel plasma cut to the exact dims you want / need and then have it coated with Rhino Bed-liner. The Rhino liner will keep if from rusting and slipping.

    Tyler

    Sounds like a pretty sweet solution. One could bolt it to the bed too if they were worried about what might happen if you were unlucky enough to have a roll over. Thanks for sharing!

    T23

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    Default Re: Weight in Truck Bed for Winter Traction

    Quote Originally Posted by T23 View Post
    What do you do to keep them from sliding around? (I have the Toyota bedliner and things just slide all over that thing....)
    I bought some nice indoor/outdoor carpet from Lowes (~$20) and trimmed to fit the bottom of the bed, over the liner. Stuff really doesn't move at all now.

    Just an idea for the slickdealers -- you can usually buy topsoil for ~$1/bag at your local Home Depot/Lowes. That's a lot cheaper than the sand bags (~$4-5) and the top soil is great for using in your yard come Spring...
    2006 Tundra DC SR5 TRD 4x4. Pretty much stock besides the Extang Trifecta Tonneau, Hellwig sway bar, shorter antenna, & Kel-Tec in the console.

  12. #26
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    Default Re: Weight in Truck Bed for Winter Traction

    Quote Originally Posted by DevinSixtySeven View Post
    nope, never have...on the 3k mile northwest road trip, all we had back there was a pair of 5gal gas cans. nary a problem, just use the button when it looks sketchy.

    ive never bothered to put stuff in the back for weight, thats only a requirement for 2wd vehicles. just learn the basics of rwd winter driving...the main thing is to let off the gas before you think youre about to hit a patch of ice, or the rear end will try and go sideways...regardless if youre in 2wd or 4wd. most of the time in anchorage you dont need the 4wd, just when the weather is really bad. after a few days with no snow, the studs wear down most of the really bad ice, and theres sand in the critical areas. its more back roads, side streets, dirt roads, stuff like that where you need the 4wd.

    -s
    I agree completely with DevinSixtySeven... Up here in Northern Vermont, we get a decent amount of snow usually, and we have some decent sized hills (for the east coast) and I go to the mtns skiing almost every weekend and I don't have any weight in the back of my p-up. However, I do have a cap, which probably adds maybe 2-300 lbs that I put on for winter use (to keep my stuff in that I carry from getting covered in snow/ice). I run in 2wd 90-95% of the time. When it's sketchy or the snow's getting deep, I hit the 4wd button. With 4wd on if I need it, and snow at lights, I keep up with or ahead of anything else, with minimal side-sliding. But, even with a small amount of snow, like we've had lately, I don't put it in 4wd unless I'm having rear traction issues taking off at stop sign/lights, and then once underway, I turn it off again.

    That being said, I have a friend that also goes up to the mtn skiing with me, that has a GM pickup similar to mine with a cap and he puts sand bags from Home Depot in them every year. So, to each his own (but I don't think his truck has push-button 4wd, but rather, he has to shift into it, and he may have to stop to do it (it's an older GM maybe 10 yrs old))

    -Garth

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    Default Re: Weight in Truck Bed for Winter Traction

    t23, you have 2wd or 4wd?

    if 4wd...dont sweat it, just press the button.



    hey all ... regarding this quote.. well i'm sure you can;t believe this.. as regards to the 'just press the button' comment this is good for oh 50 % of the driving you do.... if you 'press the button' you can get up to speed fast. BUt coming to a stop well thats a whole other question ... i'm from the great north .. yes canada and i put weight in my truck yes for the traction when gaining speed , to stop my truck sliding but also to give me every precious traction when stopping ... just me but i like to make sure all my tire get a good grip when stoping ... not jsut the front...

    on the note of what to do.. i constructed a frame to fit the slots in the bed liner to form a H then extened the frame front and back... and placed a piece of plywood on top ... i know a little over board but this gives me a flat solid platform for the winter and it keeps the sand bags i have well secured .. and only takes up 6 inchs of bed depth...

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    Default Re: Weight in Truck Bed for Winter Traction

    Just get one of those cargo bars, put the sand between the rear fenders then secure the cargo bar on top of it while pushing down on it. The cargo bar will keep the sand bags from moving.
    bug deflector/side fender turn signal/went shades/back rack/tool box/rear strip light/nerf bars/top light bar/front alternating flashers/rear strobes in turn & stop lights/bedmatt & linert/all badges removed/Helwig sway bar

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    Default Re: Weight in Truck Bed for Winter Traction

    hey see i found asproblem with that it give me an uneven bed height and well i just don;t trust anything made shoddy .... plus i need an even bed height .. i haul a lot of stuff all the time so a leve platform is key... just a thought

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    Default Re: Weight in Truck Bed for Winter Traction

    OK, I know I'm just a redneck from Vermont, but I had a '95 2wd toyota PU for 11 years and all I did was throw snow in the back for weight. OK,OK, when y'all stop laughing, listen: First, it's free, and free is always good. Second, you don't have to keep it in the back of your truck all winter especially when most of the winter you're on decent roads anyway. All that extra weight always in there wears things out faster and decreases MPG - which gets back to the pocketbook thing again. And lastly, you can always find it everywhere to throw in there whenever you need it - then shovel it out when you don't. And if you decide to leave it back there all winter - rest assured there'll be no work needed come spring to take it out cause it'll have melted!!! It's amazing how much a bunch of shovelfulls of snow weigh - especially if it's wet. It doesn't take much to have a couple hunderd pounds. I never had a problem getting where I needed to go.
    (Other times I'd just ride around with my snowmobile back there - doubled as back-up transportation!!! )
    Now I know for some folks that's alot more work than they want to get involved with and I understand: I've got a 4x4 now and never put anything in the back - just hit the button, or in my case the lever! (Which by the way is alot more macho than a button!!!!!!!!! J/K)

    Also, I realize some of you encounter bad roads/weather in places with very little snow, so obviously it wouldn't work there!

    Hi Garth - nice to see a fellow VT'er here!!!
    Last edited by jaegermeister; 10-18-2007 at 06:41 PM.
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