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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't doubt for a second that this is a VERY worn out subject for you guys, but I hope for those of you who don't mind, you'll bear with me. I have an '02 Toyota Tundra SR5 with around 103,000 miles on it. I'm thinking about getting a lift so that I could tuck some 33" tires under it, but I'm not sure how to go about doing this. I've heard about some spacers that you can throw on the coils, or something like that, but I'm not sure if that's the way to go.

I wouldn't mind a stiff ride in the least, and this is a purely cosmetic thing. Sure I'll take it offroad once and a while and through the snow, but not much more.

My questions are these:
How much of a lift would I need to fit 33" tires under it without having to trim anything up?
What would you recommend I do to obtain this height?
Any specific products to go for or avoid?

Also, being that it's relatively high mileage, I'm wondering if anyone's ever gotten their Yota bored out or anything. I think it'd be awesome to renew my engine and get that extra power out of it. So anyone with experience in this please let me know what you did, how much it cost you, was it worth it, etc... Obviously as I stated before, I don't need anything extreme since I won't have it offroad much, but to have that extra get-up-n-go would be great.

Thanks in advance guys!
-Sam

Edit: I'm no stranger to working on a truck. I did a frame up restoration on a 1954 Chevrolet pickup. It was a pretty sweet rig. I'll give you some details.

383 Stroker (425 hp 475 ft. lbs. of torque)
1977 K5 Blazer 4x4 chassis
SM 465 tranny with NP 205 transfer case
12 bolt rear end and Dana 44 front end (4.10 gear ratio)
6" of total lift
35" tires

Unfortunately I put it in the hands of a guy who was supposed to do body work, paint, and upholstery over a year ago and he's done nothing to it but let it rust. So I've got a lawsuite going on him soon and all that nasty stuff. But at this point in my life, the vehicle's no longer practicle, so I'd like to get a great running, offroad capable rig that still gets me from College Station, TX to Golden, CO without issue.

So the goal with the Tundra is a great offroad capable rig that's more tame and practicle onroad as well.
 

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I don't doubt for a second that this is a VERY worn out subject for you guys, but I hope for those of you who don't mind, you'll bear with me. I have an '02 Toyota Tundra SR5 with around 103,000 miles on it. I'm thinking about getting a lift so that I could tuck some 33" tires under it, but I'm not sure how to go about doing this. I've heard about some spacers that you can throw on the coils, or something like that, but I'm not sure if that's the way to go.

I wouldn't mind a stiff ride in the least, and this is a purely cosmetic thing. Sure I'll take it offroad once and a while and through the snow, but not much more.

My questions are these:
How much of a lift would I need to fit 33" tires under it without having to trim anything up?
What would you recommend I do to obtain this height?
Any specific products to go for or avoid?

Also, being that it's relatively high mileage, I'm wondering if anyone's ever gotten their Yota bored out or anything. I think it'd be awesome to renew my engine and get that extra power out of it. So anyone with experience in this please let me know what you did, how much it cost you, was it worth it, etc... Obviously as I stated before, I don't need anything extreme since I won't have it offroad much, but to have that extra get-up-n-go would be great.

Thanks in advance guys!
-Sam

Edit: I'm no stranger to working on a truck. I did a frame up restoration on a 1954 Chevrolet pickup. It was a pretty sweet rig. I'll give you some details.

383 Stroker (425 hp 475 ft. lbs. of torque)
1977 K5 Blazer 4x4 chassis
SM 465 tranny with NP 205 transfer case
12 bolt rear end and Dana 44 front end (4.10 gear ratio)
6" of total lift
35" tires

Unfortunately I put it in the hands of a guy who was supposed to do body work, paint, and upholstery over a year ago and he's done nothing to it but let it rust. So I've got a lawsuite going on him soon and all that nasty stuff. But at this point in my life, the vehicle's no longer practicle, so I'd like to get a great running, offroad capable rig that still gets me from College Station, TX to Golden, CO without issue.

So the goal with the Tundra is a great offroad capable rig that's more tame and practicle onroad as well.
donahoes spacers up front with wheelers add a leaf. Then you have the choice of new wheels in 16x8 and 4" backspacing with 285/75/16s or you can use the stock wheels and run 255/85/16s.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
donahoes spacers up front with wheelers add a leaf. Then you have the choice of new wheels in 16x8 and 4" backspacing with 285/75/16s or you can use the stock wheels and run 255/85/16s.
I'm already running 265/75/16's on the stock wheels, so I'd definitely go aftermarket wheels.
 

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Either a spacer to keep it on the cheap or new coilovers if you want a good ride and not have it drop out on the front end.

I would go coilovers if you have the money available vs. the spacers, I had a set for a couple years and never liked the ride even though I don't like the caddy ride of the stock truck.


As for boring and getting more power, this is an EXTREMELY expensive endeavor. aftermarket cams alone are $3200.00 for the 4.

look at lexus luthors truck, there is also another guy on here that completely rebuilt the engine and it was by no means cheap, by any stretch of the imagination.

it'll be easier to do a supercharger or headers and unichip and an exhaust to get some extra ponies out of this truck. Otherwise expect to throw down more than what it would cost to just buy a new crate motor directly from Toyota.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Either a spacer to keep it on the cheap or new coilovers if you want a good ride and not have it drop out on the front end.

I would go coilovers if you have the money available vs. the spacers, I had a set for a couple years and never liked the ride even though I don't like the caddy ride of the stock truck.


As for boring and getting more power, this is an EXTREMELY expensive endeavor. aftermarket cams alone are $3200.00 for the 4.

look at lexus luthors truck, there is also another guy on here that completely rebuilt the engine and it was by no means cheap, by any stretch of the imagination.

it'll be easier to do a supercharger or headers and unichip and an exhaust to get some extra ponies out of this truck. Otherwise expect to throw down more than what it would cost to just buy a new crate motor directly from Toyota.
Thanks for the info. So how much would I be looking at to get the coilovers, and a supercharger?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I don't like how soft the current setup is, so I'd rather go for the new coilovers. How tall would it have to sit to stuff 33's in there? Any idea how much it'd cost to get a shop to do it? I've done solid axel lifts before, but that's when I was living at home. Now I don't have a place to do it or the time. Not to mention I hear IFS lifts are a pain.
 

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Well, you're in Golden...provide beer and the installation is free :D. Just post on the Colorado thread in the Regional subforum and ask for wrench help...bunch of us have installed coilovers and have all the tools/experience.

You generally need 2" (level, if you don't touch the rear, on an Access Cab) to fit 33s on pavement without rubbing. They'll usually rub when you compress the suspension and turn. 2.5" decreases that, but the best way is deal with the pinch weld...just takes a hammer, some spray paint, patience, etc...but you don't really need to. 2.5" should do the trick, just lift the rear as well.

If you'd rather have a shop do the work, talk to Offroad Solutions (off Ralston and Sheridan, near Sheridan and HW76) or Slee Offroad (Golden, North side of town, West side of HW93).

Just a guess but four hours or so at 85-90/hour...pushing 400 bucks for the install.

...Or we'll help you for about 50 bucks worth of pizza and beer ;). Post up on the Colorado thread, some of us even have garage/driveway space. Takes an afternoon, or if you're screwing around, a day.

-Sean
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well, you're in Golden...provide beer and the installation is free :D. Just post on the Colorado thread in the Regional subforum and ask for wrench help...bunch of us have installed coilovers and have all the tools/experience.

You generally need 2" (level, if you don't touch the rear, on an Access Cab) to fit 33s on pavement without rubbing. They'll usually rub when you compress the suspension and turn. 2.5" decreases that, but the best way is deal with the pinch weld...just takes a hammer, some spray paint, patience, etc...but you don't really need to. 2.5" should do the trick, just lift the rear as well.

If you'd rather have a shop do the work, talk to Offroad Solutions (off Ralston and Sheridan, near Sheridan and HW76) or Slee Offroad (Golden, North side of town, West side of HW93).

Just a guess but four hours or so at 85-90/hour...pushing 400 bucks for the install.

...Or we'll help you for about 50 bucks worth of pizza and beer ;). Post up on the Colorado thread, some of us even have garage/driveway space. Takes an afternoon, or if you're screwing around, a day.

-Sean
Wow... awesome, man. Thanks a bunch. Right now I'm going to school at Texas A&M, but home is in CO. So it would be a while before I got up there again to get that all done. Also, I greatly appreciate the help. I'll definitely look into everything and let you know. :tu:
 
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