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Discussion Starter #1
Right rear axle seal is leaking and I never replaced one before. Does anyone have any info that I could read up on so I could attempt this? Then I have a machine shop that can press off & on the new bearing for me. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Conk
 

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This the seal you are asking about?

100_2254.jpg Little Trouble Maker.jpg Loooking down axle housing.jpg
 

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its a pain to press it in there without damaging it. I ruined mine by getting too annoyed and hammering away at it lol.
The second tiem i used a cylinder shape piece of wood to carefully tap it into place.
 

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If this is the seal the OP is referring to it can be installed using the butt-end of a large file, a hammer, and an enormous amount of patience.

Here is a short write-up I did on axle seal replacement. I need to fine tune it with some pictures and diagrams but this gives you the general gist of the process:

  • Start by blocking the front wheels and the rear wheel you are not going to work on.
  • Make sure the emergency brake is not engaged.
  • Break the lugs loose and jack up that side of the truck and place jack stands under the axle
  • Remove the wheel.
  • Remove the brake drum. It may be seized so careful use of a hammer around the outer circumference of the drum may break it loose for you. If not, you will need to thread in some bolts into the holes on the face of the drum and back it off evenly.
  • Place an oil pan and cardboard beneath your work as this is where it gets messy.
  • Using brake cleaner spray off the inside of the brake drum and the shoes/assembly.
  • There are four bolts on the back of the hub assembly that need to be removed - these are what hold the hub assembly to the axle.
  • Next disconnect the brake line and plug it to keep it from leaking everywhere.
  • Carefully, evenly, pull the entire hub/axle shaft from the axle housing supporting the axle shaft with your fingers to keep it from banging against the inside of the axle tube and stand it up on a piece of cardboard out of the way where it will not get knocked over accidentally
  • Remove the ABS speed sensor - it is magnetized and will grab the new seal when you try to install it
  • The seal will be right in front of you on the outer rim of the axle housing. Pull it out using a seal puller or other tool taking great care NOT TO scratch, dent, or otherwise damage surface of the housing where the seal seats - otherwise you will have a leaking axle seal forever.
  • Install the new seal using a large diameter socket or pipe and a hammer taking extreme care to seat it evenly throughout the installation process. Cocking or tiling the seal while seating it will damage it and require a new seal. This can be done using a broad flat piece of metal (I have used the butt end of a file in a pinch) and a hammer so long as extraordinary attention is used to insure that the entire seal is installed evenly. Make absolutely sure that whatever you are using to drive and seat the seal is smooth with no sharp edges that could damage the seal.This part of the process takes patience - don't rush. Take your time, talk to yourself while you do it, and use light taps with the hammer. Work your way around the seal in a clock-wise pattern installing it in micro-increments.
  • Reinstall the axle/hub assembly making sure to take some gear oil and lubricate the seal. Lubricate your fingers support the axle shaft too so that is slides with minimal effort. Take great care to NOT allow the axle shaft to rub or ride on the seal as this will tear the seal during installation.
  • Line up the splines and seat the axle shaft into the rear differential. Take you time and get it right. DO NOT FORCE the axle shaft into the rear differential
  • Re-attach the brake line.
  • Reinstall the four bolts that hold the hub assmebly to the axle housing.
  • Reinstall the brake drum
  • Reinstall wheel
  • Lower truck off of jack stands
You will probably need to flush the brake system (should do it once a year anyway).

After this you will want to do the differential breather extension modification. I can do a write-up on that too but cannot provide part numbers until I am able to drive again. Once I can get to the parts store I can look up the part numbers. Currently I am out of commission on percocets due to broken ribs.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yes Mr. Murdock that's the seal. I have not taken it apart yet. I noticed gear oil on the inside of the tire so I took the tire and drum off and could see gear oil dripping from a what I would call a outer seal. I have mechanical experience but never attempted this before so any help would be greatly appreciated!
Thanks,
Conk
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you so much for the info!! I will do as you instructed and let you know how it worked out for me. One more quick question, or maybe three... Is there an out seal? Should I replace the bearing if oil has got into it? The truck did a dukes of hazard jump and had to put this used rear end in because the tube got bent. The mechanic installed new bearings but guess the seal is now leaking and I want to do myself. Also what weight oil and how much of it do I need?

Thank you in advance, that's the best help I've had so far looking on the web. This is a cool site!
 

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You can use Valvoline 80-90 Gear Oil. If the bearing has been washed out then you will need to replace it - if you caught it early enough you may be able to get away without replacing the bearing. Call around to find a reputable shop to do it.

Here are a few links for you

2004 to 2006 Toyota OEM Repair Manuals (down load and save this to your computer)

http://www.ncttora.com/fsm/04-06-Tundra/techinfo.toyota.com/ileaf/06toyrm/06toypdf/06rmsrc/06tundra/sa/ras/comp.pdf

As far as other seals - yes there are but I have only ever replaced this one.

I think it will take 4.5 quarts of gear oil to fill the rear differential.
 

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Hi Conk,

Please forgive me, but I am new to the forum world! My name is Mike. I am an engineer with a very large bearing mfg, and have replaced the seals on my truck now for a third time. With what I have discovered, I think it will be the last time!! It is a chronic issue in the 2000-2006 Tundras & Sequia's. The only reason I mentioned my job, is because I have investigated the root cause of the failures of the seals which has an end result in bearing failure. Shoot me an email at [email protected] with your phone # and I will gladly explain some beneficial information. This applies to anyone out there with this same issue! Trust me, I am not trying to sell anyone anything, I just want to help everyone else out there with this information. I have several pics from my last axle rebuild that I will be posting on here soon.
 

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Hi Conk,

Please forgive me, but I am new to the forum world! My name is Mike. I am an engineer with a very large bearing mfg, and have replaced the seals on my truck now for a third time. With what I have discovered, I think it will be the last time!! It is a chronic issue in the 2000-2006 Tundras & Sequia's. The only reason I mentioned my job, is because I have investigated the root cause of the failures of the seals which has an end result in bearing failure. Shoot me an email at [email protected] with your phone # and I will gladly explain some beneficial information. This applies to anyone out there with this same issue! Trust me, I am not trying to sell anyone anything, I just want to help everyone else out there with this information. I have several pics from my last axle rebuild that I will be posting on here soon.
Oh-boy. Hey Mike not sure if you are for real or not but how about you post your phone number so the members here can call you?
 

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Smells fishy
 

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I just had my right rear seal replaced at 178K.

For several months I have noticed the distinctive odor of differential lube but could never find the leak until small black steaks showed up on the right rear wheel. Fortunately I caught it before the brake shoes became contaminated.
 

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Hey Mike, if you're so keen to help, how about posting up your "solution" instead of acting like this is some sort of "need-to-know" info. It's a rear axle seal for god's sake, not nuclear launch codes.

I can only conclude that, despite assurances to the contrary, you're here to "sell" folks SOMETHING.
 

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Hey Mike, if you're so keen to help, how about posting up your "solution" instead of acting like this is some sort of "need-to-know" info. It's a rear axle seal for god's sake, not nuclear launch codes.

I can only conclude that, despite assurances to the contrary, you're here to "sell" folks SOMETHING.
i have read a lot of these posts about bearings and seals and what not. my 01 has 189000 miles on it should i worry about it, what should i look for in terms of it possible going bad and is it something that will last as long as lube is there or should it be replaced every xxx number of miles.
 

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I figured there wod be some sceptics out there. I'm not holding any secret at all. The fact of the matter is I posted my first post while I was at work today, and due to my work load I didnt have the time to type a novel. I didn't do it when I got home either b ecause I have a 2 year old that I would much rather spend my time with! I offered myself out there as a lending hand.
When I get time tomorrow I will post some pics. If you think I'm trying to sell something, for God's sake hit me up, everything is for sale at the right price! Im posting from my cell right now, so I will post the pics tomorrow fro my pc. If you think I'm full of BS then keep it to yourself. Im just an honest man trying to help out! As far as answering you question Conk, just get a 2" pvc coupling, place a board square over the coupling & use a rubber mallet to install the new seal. For those of you that have never replaced a seal, if it ain't broke don't fix it.
Someome asked for my number. I will not post it on here for the world to see, but shoot me an email and I be glad to give you a call.
 

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...just get a 2" pvc coupling, place a board square over the coupling & use a rubber mallet to install the new seal...
Now that's a good solution. Why didn't you just say that to begin with?

You can understand that the cryptic nature of your first post was bound to sit a little akimbo with some folks, yes?

BTW: Welcome to TS!
 

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Untitled 2.jpg Untitled 3.jpg Untitled 4.jpg Untitled 5.jpg Untitled 6.jpg Sorry it has taken me a while, but I live in the boonies and only have a smart phone for the internet, so I had to finally post this while at work. I have read hundreds of post out there pertaining to this issue, and have had to experience it first hand. I have even read where folks have had to replace their seal/bearing several times. Toyota issued a re-designed oil seal, but the seal is only the after fact. Yes the seal is leaking, but why. The root cause to why the seal failed should be found! Oil seals have been used for many years. The oil seal in the rear axle is no different than that of a front and rear main crankshaft seal. I have a 93 Toyota 4x4 with 250,000 miles on it, and I've never replaced my crank seals, so why am I and others replacing axle seals so frequently?

First…If your seals have failed, check your differential vent before proceeding. If the vent is clogged, the pressure will find the easiest escape, which is the oil seals.

The rear bearing (SBB) sealed single ball bearing for the Tundra is manufactured with about .5mm (500µm) of axial clearance to compensate for axial run out (horizontal fluctuation). Toyota obviously had axial run out in mind when designing the rear axle. So knowing there is some axial run out, why is the retainer that the oil seal rides on so narrow (6mm). The OEM retainer that the oil seal rides on is approx. 6mm wide with a large chamfer on the end facing the differential and a small chamfer on the hub side. This retainer has to be installed in the precise location or you stand the chance of seal failure. Due to axial run out, heat expansion, etc., the seal will ride on the chamfer at times. Hence, why I’m complaining of it being to narrow!

Conk, you mentioned that you had a friend with a machine shop. I designed a new retainer for the seal to ride on. I do not and will not sell them however, I will share my design (free) for those of you that have the capability of having them machined & tempered through a heat treat process. The new retainer is approx. 15mm in width vs. the original at 6mm. If installed where the retainer bottoms out on top of the ABS sensor, the oil seal will ride on the center of the new retainer. Before installing the new oil seal, you must use a die grinder to open the bore of the axle housing behind the oil seal to accommodate for the extra length of the retainer. When opening the bore of the axle housing, be sure to port at the 12, 3, 6, & 9 o’clock quadrants of your bore to allow oil flow to the oil seal. This is very critical in the life of the oil seal. The oil seal must have sufficient oil flow or it will harden and become brittle.

I am in the bearing business, and specialize in differentials and rear axles. I'm not trying to sound like a know it all (KIA), I'm just expressing my experience in this business. I have seen many designs in & out that are out there, and this is not one that is bullet proof by any means. I hate to say that because I would not & do not own anything other than Toyota products. I would be a free spokesperson for them if they wanted! Untitled.jpg We all have brain farts some days, and the design engineers on this particular rear axle did that day. Through my contacts, I have been in discussion with domestic engineers (not customer service) at Toyota, and the fortunate but yet unfortunate side of things is that there is no safety issue, therefore no recall. The 07’s and up Tundras have had a similar issue, but they are from a completely different supplier than those of the Gen. 1 Tundras. I hope this information can help some of you out there that has had to do this multiple times. If you have any questions, please feel free to email me at [email protected].
 
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