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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,

I've done quite a bit of searching through the threads but couldn't seem to find the answer I was looking for. Perhaps, some of you can help?

I'm assuming I need new front brakes because I've been hearing that annoying "hissing" sound for the last few thousand miles? Hissing starts immediately upon rolling and then squeal while applying after they warm up. Pedal still feels strong though, not mushy at all.

I have 41k miles on this '05 A/C V-8 TRD Tundra. Is this a typical mileage to have to replace the front brakes? I do about 50/50 city/highway driving.

Thanks for any help or insight.
 

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Your pads could be down to the warning tabs. I would check them right away. If you have no pulsation problems, simply slip in a new set of Toyota pads. 41k is considered above average brake mileage for front pads.
Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the 411 Mike! :ts:

Bear with me as I'm not a brake expert ... should I have the rotors machined at this point too?
 

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I don't think it is necessary to turn the rotors if you are not having any problems, although I think it is a debatable topic :)

I'm getting new pads soon, right now I'm at 41,000 miles on original pads, looking to do it myself with OEM pads :)
 

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Thanks for the 411 Mike! :ts:

Bear with me as I'm not a brake expert ... should I have the rotors machined at this point too?
I also wouldn't have the rotors machined if the surface looks good (i.e. no grooves, overheating or warping)

Most shops don't do a good job turning rotors, mostly due to the equipment they have being in poor shape. If the rotors look good, simply rough up the surfaces a bit with some 220 grit sandpaper to brake up the glazed surface and install fresh oem toyota pads. Sand the rotors in a radial pattern (from inside to outside and back), or you can also use a coarse scotch-brite pad that attaches to an electric drill and put on a nice circular finish. This will prevent the new pads from squealing and will allow them to seat quicker.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I also wouldn't have the rotors machined if the surface looks good (i.e. no grooves, overheating or warping)

Most shops don't do a good job turning rotors, mostly due to the equipment they have being in poor shape. If the rotors look good, simply rough up the surfaces a bit with some 220 grit sandpaper to brake up the glazed surface and install fresh oem toyota pads. Sand the rotors in a radial pattern (from inside to outside and back), or you can also use a coarse scotch-brite pad that attaches to an electric drill and put on a nice circular finish. This will prevent the new pads from squealing and will allow them to seat quicker.
Thanks for the tips, but what if I don't do the brakes myself? If I take it somewhere, obviously I'll have to pay for the pads and labor. Assuming I replace with OEM pads + labor, what am I looking at? How much more would they typically charge to replace and machine?

Thanks.
 

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Don't let anyone turn the rotors if you don't need it. It's a waste of money, and like thumbster said, they will most likely make things worse. For that reason if the rotors must be machined I only recommend that an on the car lath be used.
If you can find a shop that will let you, buy the pads from Toyota and have them install them. $40.00 range would be reasonable.
Then again it's not difficult to change the pads. The hardiest part is getting the wheel off.
Remove the master cylinder lid.
Remove the clips and pins.
Install one pad at a time, pushing the old pad away from the rotor with a screwdriver seating the pistons.
Swap the shims to the new pads and install them.
Install the wheel and torque the lug nuts.
Always make sure you pump up the pedal to seat the pads against the rotor and check your fluid level.
You can probably find more detailed instruction in the brake fourm. But that's it in a nutshell
Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Don't let anyone turn the rotors if you don't need it. It's a waste of money, and like thumbster said, they will most likely make things worse. For that reason if the rotors must be machined I only recommend that an on the car lath be used.
If you can find a shop that will let you, buy the pads from Toyota and have them install them. $40.00 range would be reasonable.
Then again it's not difficult to change the pads. The hardiest part is getting the wheel off.
Remove the master cylinder lid.
Remove the clips and pins.
Install one pad at a time, pushing the old pad away from the rotor with a screwdriver seating the pistons.
Swap the shims to the new pads and install them.
Install the wheel and torque the lug nuts.
Always make sure you pump up the pedal to seat the pads against the rotor and check your fluid level.
You can probably find more detailed instruction in the brake fourm. But that's it in a nutshell
Mike
Thanks Mike! Appreciate it. One last question, how much are the pads gonna' cost me?

Thanks again ... this is the first vehicle I've really gotten interested in doing my own maintenance on, so thanks for understanding if my questions seem a bit lame.
 
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