Toyota Tundra Forums banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone. Recently my wife and I purchased a new (to us) 05 sequoia with about 145k miles. This is our first Toyota and excited about joining the Yota Fam and hitting the backroads with it.
Just working out all the kinks and getting a few items fixed.
Right off the bat, have to replace Radiator as it is leaking. Apparently timing belt was done before I purchased it as well. Don’t know if I should trust it or just look into getting it redone including WP, pulleys etc etc... also what major fluids or service should I look into getting done for her? Just looking for some advice or best direction for her. Basically want to square away all the mechanical issues/problems or perform all the preventative stuff as this is wifeys truck.

Thanks fellas, appreciate the input/help.
 

·
Registered
2002 Toyota Sequoia Limited 4x4
Joined
·
83 Posts
My truck has more than double the miles as yours and is in the Midwest, so it sees four seasons. After I bought it three years ago, I went through and reset as many maintenance items to 0 as I could for piece of mind. Some additional mechanical issues I've had with my truck include, front CV leaks, rotting power steering hoses, leaky valve cover gaskets, exhaust leak, bad O2 sensors, bad vent valve actuator, broken rear hatch handle and bad alternator. The water pump was the most expensive item just to give you a gauge on expenses.

Before buying my truck, I looked at sites like carcomplaints to see what owners were repairing. My truck is an '02 and it is supposedly the worst year out of the first gen to have, mechanically, according to them. Even if a problem does not manifest itself on your truck, it's good to know what to keep an eye on or what to proactively prevent on your truck. That being said, I haven't had any major issue other than the minor things I listed above due to age/wear and regular maintenance of fluids.

I may be the exception, I don't really know, but that's been my experience with my truck these past three years/70k miles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thank you Silver Sasquatch. Appreciate the info. I’ve went ahead and ordered the Haynes Repair Manual. I hope it’s of some help as I’ve read some mixed reviews on it. Hopefully at least to have some reference material.

I’ll keep an eye on those items mentioned and from time to time when I’m up for some minor wrenching I’ll go ahead and just replace them. Thanks once again 🤙🏾
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
Remember there are a lot of great videos on You Tube, also some not so great. Cross check them with posts here and of course the manual you just ordered. The biggest adventure is probably that water pump, timing belt. I watched the AA Auto YT videos three times and made my self a step by step check list, bagged and labeled the bolts. Took this old guy (74) two days (10hrs) but was a good experience and only minor scrapes and bruises. I would recommend that you remove the radiator. More space to work and a great time to R&R rad. hoses, serpentine belt, etc.
It's all in the planning and prep. I like to replace anything that is replaceable at the time, hoses, belts... Then as advised you have a new start date for routine maintenance. Nothing worse than putting it all back together only to turn around and replace a lower hose later...AHHHHHH!
Your starting out with a good approach, just remember..."Enjoy the adventure"... Chap
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thank you guys. Tackled the radiator yesterday and went a lot smoother than I thought. Definitely watched several YT videos first and memorized all the steps. Ended up going with an original OEM Rad. A lil on the pricier side but hopefully lasts us a while. When everything was apart I saw the water pump and did look newer so I think the place I purchased it from did swap the timing belt and water pump. I’ll keep an eye on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
congrats, i am a new member and just got a 03 sequoia at 188k, leaning towards a timing belt change very soon
Congrats as well! 🎉
So far I’m loving the Sequoia and love the ride. No regrets on the purchase even if it’s an older truck. It’s for the wifey but I’ve been using it and telling her to use my other truck. 😂.
Going over everything and replacing worn out interior cosmetic stuff and today looked into cleaning and lubricating everything inside rear door. Window track, and cleaned and lubricated the infamous “rear latch mechanism” as well.
Take your time and order the manual. I just received it right now and man is it packed with tons of info!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
187 Posts
There are a lot of great sources on Youtube. In general, you can watch almost anything related to a first gen Tundra. I believe the largest difference is the rear suspension, drive shafts, and rear brakes. I think we'll just see more content continue to come out on Youtube. Every couple of months I see some new videos about how the Sequoia is the best value overland vehicle, best used SUV, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
There are a lot of great sources on Youtube. In general, you can watch almost anything related to a first gen Tundra. I believe the largest difference is the rear suspension, drive shafts, and rear brakes. I think we'll just see more content continue to come out on Youtube. Every couple of months I see some new videos about how the Sequoia is the best value overland vehicle, best used SUV, etc.
Yup! Also with time, a lot of companies starting to offer aftermarket accessories for us Tree owners. 😊
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Remember there are a lot of great videos on You Tube, also some not so great. Cross check them with posts here and of course the manual you just ordered. The biggest adventure is probably that water pump, timing belt. I watched the AA Auto YT videos three times and made my self a step by step check list, bagged and labeled the bolts. Took this old guy (74) two days (10hrs) but was a good experience and only minor scrapes and bruises. I would recommend that you remove the radiator. More space to work and a great time to R&R rad. hoses, serpentine belt, etc.
It's all in the planning and prep. I like to replace anything that is replaceable at the time, hoses, belts... Then as advised you have a new start date for routine maintenance. Nothing worse than putting it all back together only to turn around and replace a lower hose later...AHHHHHH!
Your starting out with a good approach, just remember..."Enjoy the adventure"... Chap
Hey chappy r. Did you mean 1A auto videos on YouTube? If so that’s the exact one I used to replace my water pump n timing belt! I used another video also to get 2 different ideas. I’m not a mechanic at all but was able to change mine out this time last year! So far no problems. 243k and still rolling!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Manual calls for timing belt replacement every 90,000 miles on 2002. I have stuck to that recommendation and have water pump replaced at same time for peace of mind and minimal labor as shop already in front of engine at that point. Have had front drive axles replaced as had done at dealer when CV boots finally failed as was less expensive to do whole assembly than they wanted for labor to do CV boots. (boots only saved on parts but killed on labor) Keep an eye on coils( have replaced 6 of 8 over the years, will typically give a little warning and occasional misfire before completely foul up - a few days worth of in-town driving) and throttle body as well. Have replaced radiator once and all hoses twice.
2002 Sequoia Limited 4WD with TRD Supercharger, owned since new- took delivery November 2001. 237,000 miles. still my daily driver
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Other item, be certain to open close your rear windshield glass periodically or it will stick to the rubber and give issue. rear liftgate latch/cable is a known issue- lubricate periodically and if gives trouble/fail, replace latch release with metal after-market instead of plastic original and replace cable at same time in case it has stretched.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
Hey chappy r. Did you mean 1A auto videos on YouTube? If so that’s the exact one I used to replace my water pump n timing belt! I used another video also to get 2 different ideas. I’m not a mechanic at all but was able to change mine out this time last year! So far no problems. 243k and still rolling!
Yeah...That is the same ones I used... Sorry for the typo, hey I am old... Chap
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,240 Posts
Find somewhere close that does Fluid Film or Wool Wax and spray inside all the frame openings and wherever that one bad seam is that causes the dog legs to rot out. It stays oily and keeps rust from spreading. Yes it will look like you always have a leak and doesn't smell the best but it works. Wool Wax is supposed to be less fragrant.

I seriously regret NOT doing that early on in the life. Wife and I would love to have it back without all the rotting issues. Northeast salty winters really just killed it. motor, tranny, 4wd were all solid, no leaks, no burning fluids for 16 years and 187k but the last 1.5-2 years went downhill FAST with rust. I didn't feel safe with all the brake lines etc. Dust shields rotted apart, frame had rust spreading (but of course passed the recall inspection :rolleyes:). Interior was perfect even with kids and dog on lots of trips.

Search here at TundraSolutions and you'll find pretty much every fix detailed somewhere.

Welcome to TS and congratulations. If money was more readily free a new TRD PRO would probably have been the replacement. We downsized to a Pilot, it's nice but it's not the Sequoia (but much better on fuel).
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top