Toyota Tundra Forums banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
290 Posts
^ I don't think a .4 of an inch over a 1.5 years isn't anything to worry about. If it was leaking.. I think you would be able to tell visually through the oil or on the ground. It's certainly normal to lose some through evaporation based on operating temps. However; if it leaks out, lets say a garage floor, it will stay around much longer(less evaporation) for you to noticed it. Have you monitored the temp gage and noticed any increase or decrease in temp? I would think if the cap wasn't holding pressure you would notice fluctuations on the gage. Once again, the loss of.4 of an inch over 1.5 years seems normal and appears to be within the normal range of evaporation. However, if your smelling coolant on the inside or outside of the coolant reservoir.. thats a sure sign of a leak either through the heater core or somewhere within the coolant system itself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
290 Posts
SuperBusa,

If your still worried about disappearing coolant, here is some similar info that we used at our service center where I worked. After inspecting and working on several hundreds of various vehicles in the past, I still think .4(10mm) loss over 1.5 years is not uncommon. However, you may find this info helpful, keep me posted...

Coolant Loss: How to Diagnose? Further information: See Head Gasket Failure. [Query:] My Buick is losing coolant; is it the head gasket? How do I tell? How do I pull the head? [Response: Don Foster] Pulling the head is not a casual or inexpensive job. You might even cause more problems than you now have. First, look long and hard for the leak.
[FONT=Arial,Helvetica]If it were my car and I was worried about disappearing antifreeze, I'd carefully crack the oil drain plug, let the first few tablespoons drip into a bowl, and examine it carefully for antifreeze. It'll sink to the bottom, so should be the first out. Do this with a stone-cold engine (not run for several days). If the antifreeze has mixed with the oil in a running engine, it'll form a "dispersion" and the oil will take on a grayish, cloudy characteristic.[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial,Helvetica]Next, I'd pull each sparkplug and look for evidence of coolant in the cylinders. An engine leaking coolant into a combustion chamber will have an unusual amount of white exhaust smoke, particluarly on a cold day (steam). More typical, however, is that the combustion gasses are forced into the cooling system -- and can be detected with a simple instrument.ELD..electronic leak detector. Every garage should have one. I do.[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial,Helvetica]Much more likely is a hidden leak elsewhere in the cooling system. First, look very carefully around the water pump. When the seal starts to leak, often antifreeze can "sneak" unseen down to the splash pan -- and if it's a slowish leak, you might not see a puddle 'til the leak gets worse. The antifreeze will escape only when you're driving.[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial,Helvetica]Another "invisible" (but problematic) leak might be the heater core. Or even the heater control valve. If you find something around the heater (and fix it) don't forget to get the coolant out from under the carpets -- they really should be pulled. Otherwise you'll be facing rusted floors in a year, or so.[/FONT]
[FONT=Arial,Helvetica]If you're really determined (and have some equipment available), get an old radiator cap and mount a barb fitting in it. Then hook a compressed air supply to the cooling system through a regulator -- you shouldn't use more than about 10 psi pressure -- 12 max. This way you can accelerate any leak for you inspection without running the engine. [Editor's note: see Headgasket Failure for procedures on a cooling system pressure test: highly recommended that you have the correct equipment for this.][/FONT]
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top