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Don't argue with an insomniac.
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I know this subject has been beaten to death in some other threads but I have a question which isn't answered in various threads about payload etc. And I'm sure I'm not the only person with this question.


So our truck carries 1,500 lbs. By my calculation, that is 3/4 of a ton. So why don't they call this a 3/4 ton? The new F-150 has rated payload of nearly 2,000 lbs, so maybe it should be a 1-ton. The 1998 F-150 was a little closer to reality with a max rated capacity of 1500 lbs.

Is it because the new 3/4 ton Dodge, Chevy, and Ford all have a rated capacity of around 3,000 lbs? Those trucks should be called a 1 1/2 ton. And don't even get me started on the so called 1 tonner (eg many so-called 1 - tonner's payload capacity exceed 5,000 lbs!!) (2 1/2 tonner, anyone?)


This interest came about when a friend with a 1998 Tacoma said his truck is "really a 3/4 ton" I said my 2007 Tundra is "only a 1/2 ton". Interestingly, the Taco's rated capacity of 1859 lbs is in fact MORE than my 5.7 V8 powered Tundra! He's got a 3.4 L V6 !!!

So what I'm looking for here is an education. What exactly determines the "rated capacity"? It sure isn't the engine. It doesn't seem to be the brakes. It might be the tires -- but that's easily fixed. Is it the shocks and springs? The rear differential?? The overly "Flexible" frame as the Ford Forums would have one believe???

Practically speaking, if you add overload springs or Air Bags do you increase the capacity of this truck? I'm not interested if you are "legally" over the allowable payload -- that is another debate.

Actually if you want to tell me to never exceed 80% of the gross weight, go ahead -- there's even room for you in this discussion.
 

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The ratings are from the old days when the model number, F-150, C-2500, 1500, denoted the safe bed weight capacity for a specific model. 150 & 1500 specified the 1/2 ton trucks. 250 and 2500 were for the 3/4 ton trucks. 350 and 3500 for 1 ton trucks.

Today we have larger more capable vehicles that make the old numbering system obsolete. The fact that it still exists may be due to the Big 3 wanting to maintain a product line for several decades.

The heavier a truck is rated the more likely it is to be classified commercial and taxes, road use fees, and other financial burdens will be added to the operational costs of the vehicle.

The Tundra is a 1/2 ton rated truck. We know it will do way more than that. Be happy with the lower payload rating. It keeps the costs down.
 

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Here we go again!

My wife's Honda Accord has a payload of 1,000lbs does that make it a 1/2 ton? LOL!

If anyone says the Tundra is a 3/4 ton pickup I gonna slap em silly. :)
 

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Here we go again!

My wife's Honda Accord has a payload of 1,000lbs does that make it a 1/2 ton? LOL!

If anyone says the Tundra is a 3/4 ton pickup I gonna slap em silly. :)
You are right...The Tundra is not a 3/4 ton truck...Its BETTER!
 

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Don't argue with an insomniac.
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Here we go again!

My wife's Honda Accord has a payload of 1,000lbs does that make it a 1/2 ton? LOL!

If anyone says the Tundra is a 3/4 ton pickup I gonna slap em silly. :)
No, a Tundra isn't a three quarter ton, but an 89 Tacoma is a one ton pickup.
or close enough to it (1859 lbs). I got news for you Mr. Dodge 2500 (I know, you sold yours but anyway) you were driving a 1.5 ton payload vehicle.

The original question about what have they done to these vehicles besides change the numbers on the placard: are they just picking numbers at random, to they see how much weight you have to load into it to break something and cut that number in half and that's your payload, is there some government mandated test a vehicle has to pass in order to be given a specific payload designation or what because obviously half ton, three quarter ton etc. doesn't mean much.
 

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Payload is determined by subtracting your trucks weight from the GVWR. Our trucks have a GVWR of (I had to look these numbers up for you):

GVWR: 7100
Curb: -5520
Payload:1520

Hopefully that will help you out a bit.

Basically, 1/2 tons will have like a 5/6 lug pattern and 3/4-1tons will have about 7/8 lugs plus bigger everything else, like control arms, wider track, bigger frame, bigger ring and pinion, etc. etc.

The thing that's really holding our trucks back from being a 3/4 ton are the puny (no offense guys, it does flex quite a bit and while it's good for returning back to it's original shape a 3/4 ton or a 1 ton is EASILY a lot beefier:dry:), and of course the GVWR. It's simply not high enough.

-rockstate
Valid point. One other point I would like to post... The only different between a Ram 2500 and a Ram 3500 is the springs EVERYTHING else is the same. So when you overload a 3/4 ton you are overloading the springs and not the frame, drive train or tires.

I would say that the Tundra could be a 3/4 ton with the current axle, tranny and engine, but everything else would need to be beefed up IMO.

I think Toyota will need to do a complete redesign if they plan on entering the 1 ton market.
 

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It's a 1/2-ton but has components of many 3/4 ton trucks, engine, tranny, brakes, 10.5" axle, beefy control arms (the lower control arms on my tundra are beefier then my bosses GMC 2500 D-MAX), the only reason it would be rated lower is spring rates, but most probably because it would keep government fees down by keeping the GVWR under a certain amount.
 

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The terms "half ton", "three quarter ton" and "one ton" are holdovers from a long time ago. They have absolutely no meaning today other than to indicate capabilities relative to other models.
 

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The terms "half ton", "three quarter ton" and "one ton" are holdovers from a long time ago. They have absolutely no meaning today other than to indicate capabilities relative to other models.
Exactly. I think of them as the adopted names for classes of trucks. They could have created three classes and called them light, medium and heavy duty, but instead they adopted 1/2, 3/4 and 1 ton. Same thing, bad name.

Obviously there can be a lot of variation between "mediums", like a payload of 2300 or 3300, so the class is just something between light and heavy, not really meaningful.
 

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but most probably because it would keep government fees down by keeping the GVWR under a certain amount.
This is the biggest reason the gvw on 1/2 ton trucks is set as low as it is . Becuase in some states any truck with a gvw over 7200 or 7500 lbs are considered commercial vehicles and must pay a lot more for registration .
So they are all rated lower then that . In cases like the Tacoma or T100, the curb weight is much lower so it leaves it so much more room to the same gvw.

On the other hand if you are looking at it from a saftey aspect, look at a 3/4 ton chevy from 1997. There is not a single thing that is better or bigger than on a tundra . But it is rated for a lot higher gvw even though you can't make it the next hill with that 350 small block pulling a 30 ft TT or have the brakes to stop it .

Compared to today's 3/4 tons the new tundra is great but not quite there . Nor does it have the legal gvw to haul or tow what most of us want it to .
In the end I believe the tundra can safely haul more than it is rated for . there is no way you should have any issue with 2000lbs of payload .

You can look in my photos and see a pic of my truck with more thn 3000 lbs in the bed of paving stones .
 

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Yea, the "ton" ratings should not be used anymore. They really have no correspondence to what the truck can carry. The numbers just represent the series of truck and even they have no actuall value. Technically everything up to a 350/3500 is considered "light duty". 450/4500 and up are considered "medium duty" and the big rigs are "heavy duty". So within the light duty realm we need a new name for the categories. To confuse matters even more,GM has a 2500HD. I guess thats in between a 2500 and a 3500??

I guess we should just say a "1500 series truck" instead of a "1/2 ton", etc. GM actually had it a good system years ago... S-10, S-15 was the extended cab, C-10,20,30 for 2wd pickup. K10,20,30 for 4wd pickup, G10,20,30 for vans. For examply I have a G30, which is the heaviest duty van. Truck manufacturers just need to get together and agree on some payload categories.
 

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Don't argue with an insomniac.
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Yea, the "ton" ratings should not be used anymore. They really have no correspondence to what the truck can carry. The numbers just represent the series of truck and even they have no actuall value. Technically everything up to a 350/3500 is considered "light duty". 450/4500 and up are considered "medium duty" and the big rigs are "heavy duty". So within the light duty realm we need a new name for the categories. To confuse matters even more,GM has a 2500HD. I guess thats in between a 2500 and a 3500??

I guess we should just say a "1500 series truck" instead of a "1/2 ton", etc. GM actually had it a good system years ago... S-10, S-15 was the extended cab, C-10,20,30 for 2wd pickup. K10,20,30 for 4wd pickup, G10,20,30 for vans. For examply I have a G30, which is the heaviest duty van. Truck manufacturers just need to get together and agree on some payload categories.
They will NEVER agree. Marketing depends on a certain level of consumer confusion. As soon as the consumer becomes wise, the marketing department (the MOST important division in auto manufacturing, more than engineering, design, etc.) throws in a loop to keep us guessing. Dodge used to be 150, 250, etc, then decided to call it 1500, 2500. HD, Superduty, all these things are pure marketing. That's what allows them to say "we have the most Torque, HP, Payload or whatever in our class". If your class consists of one vehicle, that's an easy statement to make. But it sounds good on a commercial.
 

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Another large factor in the rating of our trucks is the tires. I think they chose to go with a softer riding tire for pleasing the masses, rather than an LT or E rated tire that will ride rougher, but haul more.
 

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I remember a while back on another website that the manufacturers were at least trying to nail down (agree upon) some towing specs that their trucks would have to meet in order to claim a certain rated towing capacity. That, at least, would be good.
 

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Toyota actually offered a 1 ton model pickup back in the mid 80's. We owned a couple for service trucks and still have one! They were your basic 80's Toyota pickup with heavy duty cooling system, tranny, 5 leaf rear springs, 4:11 or 4:30 rear gear, fuel inj 22r-e engine and heavy duty tires etc. I believe the weight capacity was around 2200 lbs, tow rating was 5500 lbs. Stiff ride with those springs but a fun truck to drive with those gears! Wish they would get back in the market with this size truck! Great gas milage and nearly indestructable!
 

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Don't argue with an insomniac.
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Discussion Starter #18
Toyota actually offered a 1 ton model pickup back in the mid 80's. We owned a couple for service trucks and still have one! They were your basic 80's Toyota pickup with heavy duty cooling system, tranny, 5 leaf rear springs, 4:11 or 4:30 rear gear, fuel inj 22r-e engine and heavy duty tires etc. I believe the weight capacity was around 2200 lbs, tow rating was 5500 lbs. Stiff ride with those springs but a fun truck to drive with those gears! Wish they would get back in the market with this size truck! Great gas milage and nearly indestructable!
Thing is, if you brought out a truck with those capacities right now, you would have to call it a half ton!!! That's what I mean about these names having no meaning!
 

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I agree with TundraBay...

It's like grade inflation. As soon as you say you have a half ton pickup, the next guy is gonna build a truck with more capacity, more torque, larger box, longer wheelbase, and call it a "half ton" even tho it's more like a 3/4 ton. Sorta like when you're fighting you wanna be at the highest weight in the lowest weight class. I was pretty disappointed when the different manufacturers started trying to outsize each other in the attempt to market the biggest truck possible to the grocery-getting helpless suburbanite. Pretty soon we'll all be driving dump trucks labeled "half ton" :rolleyes:.

BTW Toyota is already in the HD market, Hino = Toyota. Most of the construction trucks around my place right now are Hino.

I still see some of those old Toyota 1-ton duallys now and then...they're getting rare.

-Sean
 
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