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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, I have a 4x2 05 tundra double cab truck. I would like info on how to make this truck able to take muddy roads better. I already know about sand/water bags in the bed and would like to know what other people do to manage tire slip. Also, what kind of tires is best to put on the rear wheels to help with traction. I live in alabama and we get virtually no snow so thats not the problem. I will spin out in my front yard if i'm not careful. I know some will advise to dump my truck and buy a 4x4, but thats not an option for me. so, can anybody help a fellow tundra man out?
 

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You need a set of some MTs if you want to really travel the muddy roads. A leveling kit and 33s or 35s (I dunno what the first gen can clear) will really help out.

Make sure you have a working limited slip and the clutch packs haven't worn out or anything like that.

That's about all you can do on a budget. Wide tires are good for mud, but terrible for snow.

-rockstate
 

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Respectfully disagree on the "wide tires are terrible in the snow". I lived for 20 years in central Mass and took 2 weeks in Maine every fall chasing the whitetail. The 4-Runner had extra wide tires and just loved the snow. I could literally go over 2 feet of snow as the wide tires would compress it down a bit and pack it enough to support the rig. Maybe that won't work in a 6000 lb Tundra but it worked like a charm in a little 4-runner. And the tires had very deep grooves so maybe that helped. And I dont remember the brand or type of tire, sorry.
 

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Respectfully disagree on the "wide tires are terrible in the snow". I lived for 20 years in central Mass and took 2 weeks in Maine every fall chasing the whitetail. The 4-Runner had extra wide tires and just loved the snow. I could literally go over 2 feet of snow as the wide tires would compress it down a bit and pack it enough to support the rig. Maybe that won't work in a 6000 lb Tundra but it worked like a charm in a little 4-runner. And the tires had very deep grooves so maybe that helped. And I dont remember the brand or type of tire, sorry.
I guess I shoudl take that back.... My 285s have been nothing but great in the snow as they do the same thing. Before I got the suspension lift I'd be able to push a little bit of snow with almost bald KOs.

So, while traditionally the skinny pizza cutter tires will be good in the snow, if you don't have that option, go with a good tread.

-rockstate
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks MG, You will have to excuse my ignorance, but can you tell me the benefits of a leveling kit. Most advice I have got has been lift kits. After looking at the lift kits prices, I would rather level if that would help more. I would like to make clear that I do not get in the heavy stuff if i can help it. I just want to be able to go down wet dirt roads with out worrying about getting stuck, at least as much as I do now. Everybody on here knows how a tundra turns around, heck I can't even do that if the nose of my truck is going down hill a little I will just spin on top of the ground. thanks again
 

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You will want 4wd for that, and add some weight in the bed.

A leveling kit is a chunk of metal that sits on top of the strut (or in between - but it's the coil and shock). It will essentially give you about 2-3" of "lift" that will accommodate larger tires, which will give better traction in turn.

While MTs will give you better traction in those off-camber situations, it will still fight you a bit but you should be able to get out. 4wd would be your best bet, as you know.

Good luck.

-rockstate
 

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A leveling kit is a lift kit. It just generally lifts the front, or the front more than the back becuase the trucks come with the back higher than the front. Though I don't recall seeing as much rake on the 1st Gen. You'd be better off in the 1st gen forum. But basically, the lift gets you the ability to add bigger tires which gives you more clearance. Make them mud terrain tires and you get more traction. You could add some skid plates for protection. If you're still concerned about being stuck get a winch. You'd be surprised how well a 2wd can do when driven properly and nothing stupid is done.
 

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If your spinning so easily in the yard on say, wet grass. Is both tires spinning or just one? If both are then some 31" mudders will help ya. These trucks in 2wd conf. need limited slip diffs to work .
 

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Wide tires are good for mud, but terrible for snow.

-rockstate
Wide tires are not very good for mud. At least not in the South. The narrow tall mud grips dig to the hard bottom in the mud and grip way better. Wide tires just stay on top and spin.
 

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12" of lift, 360 with 400+ horse, locker in the rear, might be open frnot can't remember.

37s and narrow... sunk to the frame.



Not saying wider tires would have done better, but he might have made it a bit farther without getting bottomed out.

-rockstate
 

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12" of lift, 360 with 400+ horse, locker in the rear, might be open frnot can't remember.

37s and narrow... sunk to the frame.



Not saying wider tires would have done better, but he might have made it a bit farther without getting bottomed out.

-rockstate
Well I can say that if hes running what you claim he either A. that is to deep for much of anything to go across or B. He needs to reevaluate his offroading ability. I have been offroading in the south for a long time and yes thinner tires do better if you have the height to be able to dig until you can find solid ground.
For the original poster if you drive your truck on pavement regularly I wouldn't put "mudders" as people seem to call em on your truck. A nice A/T will do just as good with gripping through everyday things you may run into. I have a 2wd and I have no problems with getting stuck as long as I dont result to stupidity and go places where I know I will get stuck.
 

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12" of lift, 360 with 400+ horse, locker in the rear, might be open frnot can't remember.

37s and narrow... sunk to the frame.



Not saying wider tires would have done better, but he might have made it a bit farther without getting bottomed out.

-rockstate
He wouldn't have made it THAT far with wider tires. Ever heard of Co-Op Grip Spurs? Narrow Tall Mud Grips. That's all anyone uses in mud racing because they dig until they hit hard ground. From your picture it looks like that is either a pond or a dug out mud pit. Does that qualify as a "muddy road" the OP is referring to? Don't think so. So here's my question: Would you rather have wide tires that will slip around and stay on top of the mud in the road? Or would you rather have narrow tires that will push farther and dig to the bottom for better traction? IMO I would rather have skinny deep lug mud grips...but that's just me. Most roads are packed pretty hard and only have a layer of 3 to 6 inches of mud on them and skinny would be better. Now snow, that's a different story...I have absolutely no idea since Mississippi only gets about an inch of snow every 3 years :D.

But you folks up north may have different mud then we do down this way. Or maybe we just like to be a little different...ie: tires skinny and our tea is sweet!:eek:
 

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I'd recommend getting Bilstien 5100's to level out the front, and get some type of Mud terrain. I have Toyo Mud Terrains and have had them for over a year and a half and they are the business for both on and off road driving. My truck is my DD and spends about 30-40% of the time off road, in mud to be exact. Don't let people scare you away by saying "mud" tires are bad for the road or what not.

I would also recommend at least a limited slip or if funds permit an ARB or Detroit locker. That is if you don't already have a limited slip.

I think for a 2wd truck, you would want wider tires rather than narrow. But that is just my opinion.
 

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Taller tires will give a bigger contact patch on the ground, wide tires will too, but if you air down at all the length of tread will give a bigger footprint increase than the width. Get your front end up, having it sit stinkbug style like it does stock isn't going to help you get the weight over the rear tires. A limited slip would help for sure, and a locker would too. Aside from all that, driving technique and remembering the #1 rule of going off road: don't go alone. If it is possible bring a friend with a 4wd truck and straps.

For me, I have 2wd and lifted my front end to be taller than my rear by a little. This puts more weight on the rear end and helps with traction. Some people don't like the look, but I do and more than that I like the benefit. Between this and my 33's, it's made a pretty big difference for traction, and I still need LSD. Good luck.
 

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I will spin out in my front yard if i'm not careful.
hey alabama... stop peeing in your front yard! :eek: j/k. a little fun with my neighbor to the south. :)

i have an 06 2wd dc with limited slip differential. the lsd made all the difference in the world this past winter while driving in the snow. next best thing to 4wd. and i was on michelin street tires. i started out with a little firewood in the bed. i removed the firewood for a comparison, and i was amazed at how well she did without any weight in the bed. i have a few low/wet spots here at home in the fields and the lsd does it's job great. i vote lsd first, and if that doesn't do the trick then perhaps a new set of treads too. :tu:

not thrilled about it, and the tide is a rolling now wouldn't you say?
 

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I know how you feel. I got stuck in my brothers front yard when i dropped off a car dolly. It was slightly damp grass. Our trucks are just soo damn heavy. My solution will be some decent all terrains and maybe a trd or equivelent LSD in the near future. Probably some 5100s up front, but thats just for looks.
 

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Truetrac limited slip works very well, and is a relatively easy add on.
 

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What tire do you currently run?
I have had extensive mudding experience in Arkansas with wide and narrow tires and can't say their is that big of a difference in the 2 at all? i used to run Gumbo Wide Mudders on a CJ5 V6 Jeep and it was a rock Crawler mud slinging monster and was great on snow as well! The 2 wheel drive is your biggest issue but as someone mentioned MUD TIRES are a must and go aggressive and get the ones that are self cleaning! You need to trade that 2WD in on a 4x4 and do it rite, or make sure you wheel with someone that has a winch and a charged cell phone cause you will get stuck sooner than later! Lift help but having a 4x4 will be a must if you plan on doing a lot of mudding! I am running 31 10.5x15 Michelin LTXAT2's on my 93 Toy 4x4 and it did some amazing wheeling in Colorado snow at altitude without chains but eventually had to install them when the snow got to around 16" deep. these tires are not that aggressive but they surprised me with their performance without chains!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thanks guys. You all have given me food for thought. I see it did not take long for the old tall vs. wide argument to rear its head. I remember this from my dog hunting days. I knew a guy during that time who had a bronco 2 and the tall skinnys help him a lot, but his son tried these on his F150 and it almost ruined him. I guess I should move this to the first gen page. I really wish I had my small 4x2 tacoma back now. That little truck would go just about anywhere reasonable. Thanks again.
 
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