Toyota Tundra Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My 2000 Tundra is making a grinding/swooshing noise when driving. It is slow when I'm driving slow, and speeds up as I speed up, but doesn't seem to be directly related to the speed of my wheels, meaning that if I'm driving 70 on the highway it would seem to be a constant hum/grind. But it is just a very fast grind/swoosh. Breaking doesn't affect the noise really. I mainly hear it in what seems to me as the driver to be in the right rear.

I took it to a mechanic and he drained the differential and said there was silver metal shavings in it. He said it was more than likely the bearings and would cost $750-$1000 to fix. But he wouldn't know if it was anything else until he took it all apart.

Does this seem right? Should I expect more than the bearings to be bad? I thought the bearings were just in the wheels? Should I expect the bill to be higher when all is said and done?

PLEASE HELP FAST!!!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,857 Posts
Other than the wheel bearings there is also the carrier/pinion bearings. metal shavings is never good. Unfortunately, the rear housing will need to be torn apart to investigate. Is this your daily driver or do you have another vehicle. Do you have tools and feel comfortable taking apart the axle yourself? All you need is some standards tools to do this.

To check the wheel bearings, you can change one side at a time. Lift one side and remove the 4 backing plate bolts. Once removed pull the brake shaft assembly out a bit and twist it side to side. If the bearing is toast, there will be a lot of "play". Then you'll know the bearings need to be changed. Do the same for the other. To check the carrier bearings. That's a bit more work and you'll have to remove the third member from the housing. Check the bearings and see if the ring and pinion is damaged. If you have taken it this far, might as well have the bearings changed anyways.

How many miles on the vehicle?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I have about 105,000 on the truck. It's my everyday vehicle. I've done a lot of mechanical things on vehicles before, but I've never taken an axle apart! Plus, I'm in IA where it's 20 degrees outside. If it were summer, I'd be a lot more apt to try. But from the description of draining fluid, it sounds like the problem is in the differential, right? That's probably worse than the wheel bearings, I'm guessing...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,857 Posts
I have about 105,000 on the truck. It's my everyday vehicle. I've done a lot of mechanical things on vehicles before, but I've never taken an axle apart! Plus, I'm in IA where it's 20 degrees outside. If it were summer, I'd be a lot more apt to try. But from the description of draining fluid, it sounds like the problem is in the differential, right? That's probably worse than the wheel bearings, I'm guessing...
If the differential is broken (ring and pinion or spider gears) then, yes it's worse than the bearings. Yeah working on the truck in that cold of weather would not be fun.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,253 Posts
Wait...don't do anything yet! I am not so sure that I am willing to believe the mechanic's assessment. Does he normally work on Toyotas? Is he familiar with this axle and differential?

If you really managed to bust a bearing inside the differential, I honestly think you wouldn't be driving, because the rear axle would be locked up...ask anybody who's destroyed a wheel bearing or CV joint...the cage and surrounding bearings are annihilated, the rotating assembly is no longer supported, and your truck would either be making a lot more than a whirring noise, or it would be dead on the side of the road.

If you had a broken tooth, it might not be evident simply by draining the fluid, but there's a good chance that larger pieces of debris from the ring or pinion would be stuck to the magnet in the drain plug. This kind of damage ranges from a missing tooth, which might cause a recurring slip, clunk, or collision in the rear diff while driving, or it'll make a metal milkshake inside the differential and put you on the side of the road again.

The wheel bearings on these trucks are very durable, also, they are non-serviceable unit bearings which are pressed in to the hub & spindle (in front) and on to the semi-float axles (in the rear).

Is your truck 4WD?

Do you spin the wheels much? (ie not accidentally on ice, but messing around)

Did the mechanic put fresh differential fluid back in the rear differential?

-Sean
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
OK - I'm glad I tryed the site and before I continue I'd just like to thank you for all the info I've glened off it so far. I have a 2000 Tundra, and am experiencing the same problem as Skoool, and as well as Skoool; I'm ok with tools and am willing to give the Dif. and bearing problems I'm having a try, and fixing the problem. One thing though I've never tackeled pressed bearings before and don't know where to start with it, I have a feeling before looking at the set up that I could take the unit to a shop and have the work done after I've removed the units from the housing. Am I right? I have a book on CD and it will guide me I'm sure; so here goes. Let you know how I've managed later.

Wackpus
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,276 Posts
I just went through this, ended up paying for my rear bearings to be replaced and the problem came back and you are not going to believe what is was. The inner dust shield that rides inside the groove of the rear drum was pressing inside the drum causing the noise. With the expansion with heat the problem would come and go. If you look on the back side of the rear hub there is a seam along the back below the axil that has started to rust pushing it inwards towards the drum. A little grinding down the. Lip and the noise is gone. Just pull the rear drum and you will see the lip and where the metal to metal rubbing is taking place. I will do a write up on this because as the tundras get older and surface rust takes place it will happen over and over.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
68 Posts
ever figure out what was making the noise, i have something like that going on in my 05 dc now, i just had to replace the center bearing for the drive shaft and now its making this whooping noise i notice it at 10mph and over and gets slightly faster at highways speeds, over the winter my wheels did slip and grab solid ground, wondering if i busted a tooth or had a bearing fail but i also have 130k on my truck and havent changed the rear breaks either :rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
I just went through this, ended up paying for my rear bearings to be replaced and the problem came back and you are not going to believe what is was. The inner dust shield that rides inside the groove of the rear drum was pressing inside the drum causing the noise. With the expansion with heat the problem would come and go. If you look on the back side of the rear hub there is a seam along the back below the axil that has started to rust pushing it inwards towards the drum. A little grinding down the. Lip and the noise is gone. Just pull the rear drum and you will see the lip and where the metal to metal rubbing is taking place. I will do a write up on this because as the tundras get older and surface rust takes place it will happen over and over.
Im actually having a similar problem. I had a vibration and whirrng noise from my drivers side rear wheel. it seemed to get worse with wheel speed. I just recently replaced the rear wheel bearing, and for 4 days it was quiet. yesterday driving home from work the noise started again> I was thinking either I got a faulty bearing or possibly it was damaged at the machine shop when getting it pressed in. Im going to take a look at my drums and see if im having the same issue as you.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top