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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'll try and make this as short as possible. 76,000 miles and the check engine light comes on. Engine is running rough and throwing codes P0300, 301, 3, & 5, so I know it means multiple cylinder misfires, specifically cylinders 1, 3, & 5. Bring it to the dealer who first tries a flush (at an approx cost) of $250 and then when that doesn't work replaces the fuel injectors for cylinders 1, 3 & 5. Also changes the plugs and the air filter. Total bill $1162.32 (approx $800 for the injectors incl labor + $40 for plugs & filter + tax, etc).
Tells me that it's still running slightly rough, but if you raise the idle slightly (like turning on the a/c) it smooths out, so I should run a couple of tankfulls of premium through it and that should fix everything. WHAT?
Anyway, about a month later before I can get the second load of premium in (I don't drive that much, these days) the check engine light comes back on, it starts running very rough again and throws the same codes. I bring it back to the dealer who now replaces both bank 2 oxygen sensors at a cost of $490.67.
I pick it up and it runs perfectly. Because of quite a bit of screaming and yelling, I didn't have to pay the last bill.
Now my questions are the following:
Could it have been the oxygen sensors all along?
Also, part of this seems like trial and error repairs. By that I mean, the flush didn't work, so should I have to pay for that? OR was that an honest attempt to try and save me money?
Do the prices seem reasonable?
I'm a diehard Toyota fan. I have 2 of these 2001 Sequoia Limiteds and they are my 9th and 10th Toyotas. My 1st was a 1974 Toyota Celica ST and I've owned nothing since. I can honestly say that this is the first bad experience I've ever had with Toyota and this really has left a bad tatste in my mouth. I've called Toyota in CA and gotten nowhere.
I fully realize this happened to me at a bad time with Toyota, and maybe one bad experience shouldn't affect 35 years of satisfaction and 2 million miles of no problems, but still I'm angry and it isn't directed at the vehicle but more at the service dept and customer service at Toyota, etc. Sure I could go to a different dealer, but there is nothing anywhere close. Anyway, any answers to my questions would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks in advance,
Charles
 

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Yes, it could have been the O2 sensors all along....but they could have gone bad after being run with malfunctioning components, plugs, dirty throttle body etc. It's kind of hard to tell, and they usually want to do the cheaper things first?? It's kind of weird to have the sensors go that quickly? Glad to hear you have it running well again!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Many thanks for the reply. I certainly appreciate it. To be frank, I can't honeslty say that they didn't check the coil first.

You say "Yes, it could have been the O2 sensors all along....but they could have gone bad after being run with malfunctioning components, plugs, dirty throttle body etc.
It's kind of hard to tell, and they usually want to do the cheaper things first?? It's kind of weird to have the sensors go that quickly?"

So, (I'm trying to learn) the O2 sensors can go bad if the plugs were bad and/or that's why they they tried flushing the the injectors/cleaning the throttle body and changing the plugs? and by "going that quickly" you mean so soon after the engine light came on and the engine started running rough?

And IF it was the O2 sensors all along that's why even after doing everything (including replacing the injectors) it still didn't fix the problem. Although, I must say it didn't run nearly as rough as it did when I brought it in...for about a month.
So, what made it better for a short while?

Also why do you ask about the coil. And why DIDN'T it throw a code for the O2 sensors?
Sorry to be such a pest. Just really curious and trying to understand this.
Thanks again,
Charles
 

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Hey Charles, those are good questions and I often ask why people do what they do or why they didn't do it a different way. I'm no Toyota certified mechanic, but it isn't always clear why things do what they do. The computer is constantly changing, and adjusting things like injector pressures to compensate for internal spring wear and things like that. If your motor was not properly maintained, it could have caused more adjustments to keep the engine running as best it could. When the tune up was done, I'm sure it helped quiet a bit and the computer has to adjust for those changes. If the 02 sensors were already degraded, then sure maybe it should have thrown a code...but again I'm no technician. It's mechanical, and things are going to break down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Good point about it being mechanical and about the computer adjusting accordingly. At first glance it just seemed like "well, it's not our money, we'll just keep trying stuff until we get it right." Especially since they throw in things like "we get a lot of injector problems from people who buy their gas from WaWa". Sure, anything's possible, but the WaWa that I get gas from gets 3-4 loads a day, so a lot of vehicles must be having problems! That and after almost $1200 and it still isn't right, they tell you to run a couple of loads of premium throught it when it's supposed to run on regular. So, when you combine this with everthing else, you get the feeling that they have absolutely no idea of what they are doing. Hence the reason for my questions (and my hope that a Toyota certified mechanice might take a stab at answering the questions). In any case I still really appreciate your answers because I did learn something. Thanks again.
 

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The Sequoia was introduced in the 2001 model year as Toyota's biggest sport utility vehicle. And big it is. The Sequoia is based on the new, full-size Tundra pickup truck. In terms of price, it's in between the 4Runner and the more luxurious but smaller Land Cruiser.

The Sequoia comes in two- and four-wheel-drive versions and in two trim levels: SR5 and Limited. There's one body style, a four-door with a lift gate in the back. The vehicle we drove, a four-wheel-drive Limited, has a cars.com target price of $41,148.
Driving Experience

For its humongous size, the Sequoia handles remarkably well. Think of it as a 2 1/2-ton Camry. The 240-horsepower V8 is incredibly smooth, as is the four-speed automatic transmission. On the road the Sequoia is very quiet and comfortable. The Sequoia doesn't feel as tippy as a lot of SUVs. The standard antilock brakes worked well.

All of this refinement makes the Sequoia feel smaller than its main competitor, the Ford Expedition, although the two vehicles are within an inch of each other in virtually every dimension. (The Toyota, at nearly 5,300 pounds, is actually almost 500 pounds heavier.)
 
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