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I have a 2002 Camry SE V6 with 40,000 miles on it. Bought it new, don't drive it much obviously. Car is immaculate. I have changed the oil every 3,000 miles as well as rotated the tires, changed air filter, cabin filter, etc.
I want to take it in and get the other necessary fluids changed. My question is this: I'm planning on having them change the coolant and brake fluid. Do I need to have the transmission flushed as well? What about the belts? The service schedule has both the miles and time listed. So at 72 months/90,000 miles they suggest changing the timing belt, do I really need to change a timing belt on a car with 40,000 miles? Planning on keeping this car a long time.
Any other maintenance I should have done due to age? I hate calling a Toyota dealer and saying "What do I need to have done to my car?" Might as well hand them a blank check. Figured I'd ask the question here first.
Thanks in advance.
 

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Fluids you should definitely have changed based on age if you haven't racked up the appropriate mileage. It'd be wise to have the transmission fluid changed as it tends to break down over time, plus the metal shavings from the clutches are still in the filter and/or the fluid, so all the better for getting those out.

For the belts, I have a different philosophy. The timing belt is sealed behind the timing cover and gasket. Look at your accessory belts, as they are exposed to the elements. This gives you a gauge. If the accessory belts aren't cracking and are in good condition, your timing belt will be in better shape than those. The timing belt also uses an automatic tensioner so optimal belt tension is always kept, preventing any wear from belt slack. And if you're in doubt about the condition of the timing belt, you can remove a few bolts and take a peak behind the timing belt cover. If it has any visual signs of wear (cracking, glazing, etc), have it replaced immediately.

I had the timing and accessory belts replaced on my mom's 2000 Camry I4 at 93k. At 210k miles, I looked at the belt by taking off the timing cover. It practically looked brand new. I was quite pleased.
 

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Saw this note and thought I would in put a tiny bit. My sister gave me a Toyoto 2002 which was in excellent condition. It was a Camery and I was concerned about the timing belt, because the engine had high mileage. So I had plans to change it. After checking online. I found out the engines for that year were replaced with a chain link belt and didn't need changing.
 

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Timing belt isn't something you gamble on. Mileage or TIME. Its overdue.

A belt doesn't need to show cracks in it to be weakened and a failure risk. So, change the accessory belt also.

All fluids need a complete exchange. This includes brake fluid(should be bled every 2 years), ATF, coolant, PSF...

Bi-metal element in the thermostat is probably worn so change the thermostat too.

Tires also dry rot. So, if they're more than 5 years old, that is a gamble that you take.

I find that many visually immaculate cars are overly neglected with mechanical maintenance. This leads to bigger problems/repairs down the road. Most maintenance items have a maximum time or mileage requirement, whichever comes 1st.
 
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