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I have 178-k on my tundra & the T- belt is original, iam leaving in 3-wks.for a 3,000 mile trip, after reading the above I guess I should replace mine?
Yes. Spec is every 90k or 9 years.

Best case it breaks on start up and doesn't cause any damage and you still need to replace everything plus spend the time checking cylinder health.

Worst case you bend valves/crack pistons and have to still replace the belt, plus whatever damage or drop in a new engine.

Replace everything, timing belt, serpentine belt, tensioners, idlers, water pump, radiator hoses, thermostat, and coolant.
 

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Thans for the info guys.
Yes, I plan on getting at least 250,000 miles out of the truck, maybe more.
It's been a great truck. I think it runs as good today as it did when I bought it new.

Len in NC
250000 is nothing for this trucks ,mine 278000 miles still no problem ,my goal 400K as long as the frame still solid
 

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My 2002 Tundra has 140,000 trouble free miles on it.
I have used Mobil 1 since the first oil change.
My dealer keeps telling me I need to replace my timing belt.
I'm of the opinion that "if it ain't broke, don't fix it".
Should I replace the timing belt as he suggests?
If so, are there other components that should be replaced at the same time?

As a side note, pulsating front disc brakes seem to be a common problem on Toyota Tundras. Is there a long term fix for this problem?

Thanks for your advice.

Len in NC
don't forget replaced the tensioner, and check no cam shaft seals leaking
 

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I change out my timing belt, 2002 4.7, 182,000 miles, in about 8 hrs over two days. Only thing I ended up buying in addition to the whole TB/Water Pump kit, which I got from Rock Auto was the tool for making the Crank Pulley nut removal easier.
I had no clew when or if the precious owner had changed it or not. Now I know. A small investment for peace of mind... Chap
 

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I have a 2001 that now has 391,000 miles on it. I last did my timing belt at 375,000. For me it was a full two day job, but it was worth it to save close to $1200 versus taking it to the dealer. My friend and I actually used a large pipe wrench to remove the harmonic balancer, but that's what we had access to. I don't believe all of the instructions I've seen suggest to remove the radiator, but I feel like it would be an absolute bear to try and work around it.
 

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Yeah I agree. Removing the radiator is not that difficult and the extra work space is well worth the effort. Again 1A Auto has a three part "How To' do the job on You Tube. He removes the radiator and shows a way to remove that pesky 181 foot pounds crank pulley bolt using a home made tool. Tried it, tool split for me. Chap
 

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I followed a good suggestion. I cut a one inch strip of rubber roofing (inner tube) to go around the balancer. Then a large hose clamp (or multiple joined) with head in a good spot for a piece of wood going to the frame. I needed a putty knife to keep the wood from splitting. It worked great for offand on. Then a lot of balancers actually have jack screw holes. Just lube a pair of bolts and keep screwing. Many talk of prying and pulling.
 

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As suggested in this and many other posts; "Deal with everything you can while you have the front of the engine opened up..." Spending a few dollars for parts and the investment of a little bit of time is better than having to tear it all apart to do later. Replacing a Timing Belt without replacing the water pump, idler pullies and seals which can all be purchased as a kit is just delaying another project. R&R seals and inspecting everything that is now visible is a wise choice. Replacing a thermostat and serpentine belt as you re assemble things is not adding much additional cost.
How many times have I done a project and ended up un-doing some of the repairs to go back and take care of a piece of the puzzle that I chose not to address the first time?
Good planning and a willingness to wait on a seal or part before buttoning it up is the key to a successful repair.
Now all I have to do is follow my own suggestion... As always, "Enjoy the adventure"... Chap
 

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My compadre had a local garage do the timing belt on his Tacoma ~ the price nearly bowled him over backward. He mentioned all those ancillary parts they used as an excuse for them to pad the bill.
"That's cheap insurance," says the ol' boy Jonesy.

"No it's not !" was his retort.

A chain is only as strong as it's weakest link ~ if any of those idlers etc. goes bad while it's running there goes your engine.
 
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