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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My dad passed down his old tundra that now has over 422k miles (original engine and transmission) it’s been a great truck for me. I got quoted $2200 at mechanic to replace cv axle and change both cats so I’m doing that myself this weekend, already have the parts ordered. Not too worried about it, looks fairly easy. But watching some videos it looks like when changing the cv axles some gear oil from the front diff will come out. I’m wondering if I should change the oil or just top it off. I know the first thing on your mind is just change it but front diff oil hasn’t been changed in the life of the truck and neither has the rear diff oil. Should I top off the front diff or drain and fill it? And should I change the rear diff oil while I’m working on it or just leave it be? I’ve read some places that after so long, changing it could be what ruins it. Thank you for any advice
 

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Driver of 2 Tundra trucks
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What's wrong with the front axles and the cats?
Do you have a Toyota dealer that can quote the job, and verify the need?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Boot is torn on driver side axle, figured I’d replace both since I’m already putting effort into it. Thought about just changing the boot but opted for entire aftermarket axle. Po420 and P0430 code is getting thrown. Replaced all o2 sensors and brought it to mechanic with one of the fancy scanners. They said they’re 100% sure it’s both cats that need to be replaced to turn off MIL and pass inspection.
 

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Yeah. Just a heads up the Toyota makes ‘Reman’d Axles’ at a fraction of the cost of new. The designation number has -84 (dash 84) behind the OEM New number.

Wished I’d have gone that route 4 years when I had a shop rebuild the front end. New OEM were $1000 for both at the time. I ended up with Import Directs which are ok, but not as strong. My truck is 99% street so its not a biggie but still OEM reman is a great option.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I am not sure aftermarket axles are something you want. Is this something you should stick to OEM on?
Yeah I’ve seen a lot of people say OEM is the way to go. Only putting aftermarket on because 1. Cost and 2. I hardly ever drive the truck

I have a daily driver for work and whatnot and the truck is just when I need to haul or have some fun on land. I am planning on keeping OEM CV axle in case aftermarket fails then I’ll just change the boot
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Sounds like you should change the fluid on both diffs and the transfer case.
Im leaning that way too. Have you ever heard of anything bad happening after waiting so long before doing it? I just don’t want to change it and that be what causes it to fail after it’s held together for so long
 

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Im leaning that way too. Have you ever heard of anything bad happening after waiting so long before doing it? I just don’t want to change it and that be what causes it to fail after it’s held together for so long
No. That's only transmissions and it's usually due to a power flush, not a regular drain n fill.
 

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2004 Tundra Double Cab 4x4
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My dad passed down his old tundra that now has over 422k miles (original engine and transmission) it’s been a great truck for me. I got quoted $2200 at mechanic to replace cv axle and change both cats so I’m doing that myself this weekend, already have the parts ordered. Not too worried about it, looks fairly easy. But watching some videos it looks like when changing the cv axles some gear oil from the front diff will come out. I’m wondering if I should change the oil or just top it off. I know the first thing on your mind is just change it but front diff oil hasn’t been changed in the life of the truck and neither has the rear diff oil. Should I top off the front diff or drain and fill it? And should I change the rear diff oil while I’m working on it or just leave it be? I’ve read some places that after so long, changing it could be what ruins it. Thank you for any advice
I replaced the Driver side cv axel on my 04 tundra with an axel from Napa. That was some 30,000+ miles or so ago. There have been no problems with the Napa axel. I bought two axles at the time but only installed the one. Still have the second for a spare. The amount of diff oil was negligible. Just topped it off. Don't create more work for yourself.
 

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2006 Crew Cab Limited 4x4
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Not yet.

OP, I got the trackmotive axles from rockauto. I don't like the way they fit due to the diff juice now leaking out, but I also used the extended travel ones due to lifting. A lot of people recommend CVJ reman axles.
That is a point nobody has covered here; replacing the front dif CV Axle Seals, which after 400K sounds like sound advice!
As you stated, if you're trying to only do the job once, there is no time like then to do it right!
And that was Great Advice about making sure you can open Fill Holes before draining ANY of the driveline fluids.
Good luck, it isn't really that hard, just that important.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
So after great frustration my plans have changed. First shipment both axles came damaged. Second shipment only one was damaged so went to install just to find out it’s about an inch short… great. So now I have ordered ‘oem fit’ boot kit and hoping that the bearing wasn’t damaged.
Still planning on changing fluids

Got both cats out and new ones are a perfect fit so there is some good news to the repair.
 

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02 AC 4x4 v8
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That is a point nobody has covered here; replacing the front dif CV Axle Seals, which after 400K sounds like sound advice!
As you stated, if you're trying to only do the job once, there is no time like then to do it right!
And that was Great Advice about making sure you can open Fill Holes before draining ANY of the driveline fluids.
Good luck, it isn't really that hard, just that important.
The passenger side one is tricky. Requires precise measurements. Drivers side just goes till it stops. Wouldn't hurt to replace the needle bearing with the ECGS bushing either.
 

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The Passenger Side was the one I changed out but the seal was fine so I left it. I have it in my stock parts just in case, just like the wheel hub one.
Being very gentle placing is key until you give it that last hard shove to lock it in!
 

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Yeah. Just a heads up the Toyota makes ‘Reman’d Axles’ at a fraction of the cost of new. The designation number has -84 (dash 84) behind the OEM New number.

Hey, Professional Hand Model - where can I find the Toyota ‘Reman’d Axles’ you referenced ? I need a couple for our Rav4 and may want to replace the ones on my 200 Tundra SR5 w/ 410,589 miles.
 
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