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Hi, I'm buying a 2005 Sequoia SR5 with 180k miles. What is the main things to do right now? Can anyone tell me please which parts I need to check or replace?
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Timing belt is every 90k miles so it's probably due (and may or may not have been changed at all). If you can get a the VIN, you can add it to your profile on Toyota.com and see the dealer maintenance history. Also look for stickers in the engine bay as the timing belt kits come with them. Not sure what else there is but with timing belt, usual recommendation is the ASIN kit or similar with rollers and all that. I'd do the coolant pump while I was in there -- I did on mine and I'm glad I did as it was dripping (or was at some point) but couldn't see that until all the covers were off.
 

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Ensure to check the lower ball joints. Ensure that they are OEM ones. And i recommend changing the bushings on the steering rack as well as other bushings which may have become soft and spongy over the years. Replace with silicone bushings like energy suspension....

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The Dealer Service Report will only pertain to services performed at a Toyota dealership, so if the previous owner used a non-Toyota service, it won't be captured in the history. They can also determine if any of the recall work has been performed. Copy/Paste the link below to see recall information. I usually do a transmission flush and fill, same with the coolant unless the history says it is current. TOYOTA SEQUOIA 2005 Auto Recalls - Justia Car & Truck Recalls
 

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Ensure to check the lower ball joints. Ensure that they are OEM ones. And i recommend changing the bushings on the steering rack as well as other bushings which may have become soft and spongy over the years. Replace with silicone bushings like energy suspension....

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Polyurethane bushings i meant

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change the alternator, thermostat, timing belt, fuel pump, radiator hoses, spark plugs, oil and oil filter, air filter, antifreeze flush and refill, top off brake fluid, last and most importantly if this is gonna be a car you’re gonna keep change the transmission fluid its most likely sealed so take it into the Toyota dealership. These things are crucial because believe me no matter where you buy your car they use the generic shit and not the recommended or OEM parts and fluids.
 

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2002 Tundra, 2005 Sequoia, 1985 4Runner, 1989 4Runner, 1999 Camry, 2000 Camry, 2000 Avalon, 2019 BRZ
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Check and lube the rear hatch latch.
 

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change the alternator, thermostat, timing belt, fuel pump, radiator hoses, spark plugs, oil and oil filter, air filter, antifreeze flush and refill, top off brake fluid, last and most importantly if this is gonna be a car you’re gonna keep change the transmission fluid its most likely sealed so take it into the Toyota dealership. These things are crucial because believe me no matter where you buy your car they use the generic shit and not the recommended or OEM parts and fluids.

This is 99% nonsense. I just sold a 2001 Tundra with 280k miles on it. It had original alternator, thermostat, fuel pump, and all hoses. I hope this is a tongue-in-cheek comment. The other suggestions here for coolant, air filter, etc. are good to do at any time, not just at 180k. Definitely do the timing belt. I did mine every 90k, never had a problem.

These trucks go a long time with a little care. But this suggestion is way overkill. Fix these things when they start having problems. Otherwise, you could start replacing things "just because" and it can get out of hand very quickly.

Enjoy your new ride!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you for your recommendations, one more thing, what type of oil you recommend me to use? Synthetic, conventional high mile, full synthetic?
 

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MikeG. Your method of replace when you have a problem is the problem. You clearly cant maintain your car, I use all OEM parts for my Tundra when replacing them. It is better to be mindful about replacing those parts at that mileage because you dont know how rough the previous owners treated it or lack their of on the dealerships end. Better safe than sorry bud.
 

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MikeG. Your method of replace when you have a problem is the problem. You clearly cant maintain your car, I use all OEM parts for my Tundra when replacing them. It is better to be mindful about replacing those parts at that mileage because you dont know how rough the previous owners treated it or lack their of on the dealerships end. Better safe than sorry bud.
The only repair I ever did before it broke was the timing belt. Knowing what damage could be caused by a timing belt breaking means it make sense to change it on a schedule. The other things, in my experience, give you some warning when they are failing (e.g., water pump will leak, alternator will stop charging, etc.). You can replace parts which you believe will fail whenever you want, I just don't find it feasible.

Besides, that's why we buy Toyotas -- they don't have those problems like other makes. In my 15 years and 280k miles experience with my 2001 access cab 4x4, I never had a repair bill of $1000 or better. Rock solid, good truck. Bought a 2012 crew cab a couple of years ago, just didn't need the older one any longer. Sold it to a friend who loves it. He'll probably get another 280k miles out of it.
 

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The only repair I ever did before it broke was the timing belt. Knowing what damage could be caused by a timing belt breaking means it make sense to change it on a schedule. The other things, in my experience, give you some warning when they are failing (e.g., water pump will leak, alternator will stop charging, etc.). You can replace parts which you believe will fail whenever you want, I just don't find it feasible.

Besides, that's why we buy Toyotas -- they don't have those problems like other makes. In my 15 years and 280k miles experience with my 2001 access cab 4x4, I never had a repair bill of $1000 or better. Rock solid, good truck. Bought a 2012 crew cab a couple of years ago, just didn't need the older one any longer. Sold it to a friend who loves it. He'll probably get another 280k miles out of it.
I take every precaution and check whats been done. As a guy whos worked on cars for years I’ve not only repaired other people’s problems but as well as my own. I cant name you how many times i get a customer that buys a Toyota cheap or from a dealership as early as 100-190k miles and i see the wrong spark plugs, a broken thermostat, shot hoses, wrong coolant, etc. remember I said you dont know how the previous owner treated it and this is why you must take precautions because when this is done you have nothing to worry about.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I take every precaution and check whats been done. As a guy whos worked on cars for years I’ve not only repaired other people’s problems but as well as my own. I cant name you how many times i get a customer that buys a Toyota cheap or from a dealership as early as 100-190k miles and i see the wrong spark plugs, a broken thermostat, shot hoses, wrong coolant, etc. remember I said you dont know how the previous owner treated it and this is why you must take precautions because when this is done you have nothing to worry about.
Thanks for your recommendations. I appreciated it. Even, the SUV was for the 1st owner until 150K, and supposedly He performed all things at dealer shop, then my brother in law bought it, and He only did a oil and filter change and replace the tires. The SUV is in perfect shape, but probably needs some works as you mentioned before.
Take care!
 

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Want to save money Damiros? Go to the "University of YouTube" and start watching the "How To..." videos on DIY maintenance. Also, use the search feature on this forum. Good luck.
 
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