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I have a 2005 4wd Sequoia with 219,000 miles with some vibration issues. Current symptoms:

1. Slight vibration when cruising at interstate speed (@70) - mostly felt in floor and seat, can see a bag or something sitting in the passenger seat vibrate, feel it in your bottom, see ripples in a cup. Very slight vibration in steering wheel.
2. More pronounced vibration when accelerating at lower speeds (@35) all the way up to cruising speed. Vibration gets worse anytime you accelerate anywhere in that speed range. Can feel it in same places as #1 but more pronounced. Really feels like its coming from floorboard more strongly.
3. Vibration is still there on deceleration but not as pronounced. As soon as you let off the gas you can feel it lessen.
4. Steering wheel vibration when braking from a higher speed, slight but noticeable.

Worth noting: Inner CV boots are slinging grease and have been for quite some time. Just never got around to fixing them.

What I have done recently:
1. New tires. Re-balanced (road force) and aligned three times at Firestone. Vibration was terrible. They warrantied the tires and upgraded to Bridgestones (again, road-forced). This made the vibration much better, back to where it was before new tires (which is main reason I went for new tires in the first place).
2. New LBJs
3. New Bilstein shocks front and rear (kept stock coils)
4. New front sway bar end links
5. New Toyota brake pads front and rear. I replaced the front rotors with Toyota parts about three years ago and have had no issues there. I do not believe they are warped.
6. Replaced both rear u-joints with spicers.(The stock ones did not appear especially worn once I got them off but one was a little tough to move back and forth, felt jerky, not smooth. There was no play before replacing, but based on my searches these seemed likely culprit given the mileage)

These all made the ride and handling better, but none have addressed the described vibration.

When I removed driveshaft, I did notice some rotational play where the yoke goes into the transmission (this is 4wd so flanged yoke there). Not much side to side play. Did not notice any obvious leak there. I did not have any noticeable play at the third member end.

My questions:

1. Is the flanged yoke to transmission play normal? Can that cause vibration?
2. CV axles - can these cause vibration when accelerating, even if I am in 2wd only?
3. Any other ideas? Could transmission / motor mount do this?
 

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Sounds like your rear bearings. You're describing basically the same symptoms that I had before replacing them. There is another bearing in the front diff that can cause a cyclical vibration at lower speeds. That one is usually felt in the floorboards.
 

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Sounds like your rear bearings. You're describing basically the same symptoms that I had before replacing them. There is another bearing in the front diff that can cause a cyclical vibration at lower speeds. That one is usually felt in the floorboards.
Yup, same here. Exact same issue and it ended up being the rear passenger side wheel bearing.
 

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Yup, same here. Exact same issue and it ended up being the rear passenger side wheel bearing.
Thank you for the input. I wondered about wheel bearings, but wasn’t sure if that could do it. I will check them or get them checked. Is this the type of thing you can jack it up and shake the wheel to feel for play?
 

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Thank you for the input. I wondered about wheel bearings, but wasn’t sure if that could do it. I will check them or get them checked. Is this the type of thing you can jack it up and shake the wheel to feel for play?
I could not feel any play by shaking the wheel. Once I removed the axle from the truck I could see the bearing jiggling within the housing.
 

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Wheel bearings can be easy to diagnose. On the highway turning the wheel to the left the car leans to the right and takes weight off the left side of the vehicle. If the sound goes away or gets quieter you know its the left side. If it gets louder as you put weight on whichever side, you know thats the problem side.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Wheel bearings can be easy to diagnose. On the highway turning the wheel to the left the car leans to the right and takes weight off the left side of the vehicle. If the sound goes away or gets quieter you know its the left side. If it gets louder as you put weight on whichever side, you know thats the problem side.
That makes sense. Problem here is that I don't have any sound, or at least not that I can pick up. This thing has somewhat loud exhaust which makes it harder to pick out sounds too.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I could not feel any play by shaking the wheel. Once I removed the axle from the truck I could see the bearing jiggling within the housing.
Sounds like you did this yourself? How hard is it? I've read these (Sequoias) are harder because of the rear disc brakes and the available SSTs for Toyota axles not fitting correctly to get the parts pressed off. Also read something about needing to cut some parts off. I am pretty competent with wrenching, just not all that experienced. I've read up on replacing bearings on my 3rd gen 4runner and feel I could tackle that, but I am intimidated by the sequoia based on some posts out there about the diy.
 

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Wheel bearings can be easy to diagnose. On the highway turning the wheel to the left the car leans to the right and takes weight off the left side of the vehicle. If the sound goes away or gets quieter you know its the left side. If it gets louder as you put weight on whichever side, you know thats the problem side.
Yep, thats exactly what I got and how we diagnosed.
 

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Sounds like you did this yourself? How hard is it? I've read these (Sequoias) are harder because of the rear disc brakes and the available SSTs for Toyota axles not fitting correctly to get the parts pressed off. Also read something about needing to cut some parts off. I am pretty competent with wrenching, just not all that experienced. I've read up on replacing bearings on my 3rd gen 4runner and feel I could tackle that, but I am intimidated by the sequoia based on some posts out there about the diy.
I did the rear bearings last year. I can see why shops charge so much for the work. It's a big pain in the butt. You're correct that the typical SSTs don't fit the Sequoia. In general, it is the same process as the 4runner. In some ways, it's easier because you don't have to worry about making sure the retaining ring sits on the middle of the oil seal. On the Sequoia you just press it all the way down until you get everything set in place. Check out my thread below for some pictures and more indepth discussion. Let me know about any questions.

 

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Discussion Starter #13
I did the rear bearings last year. I can see why shops charge so much for the work. It's a big pain in the butt. You're correct that the typical SSTs don't fit the Sequoia. In general, it is the same process as the 4runner. In some ways, it's easier because you don't have to worry about making sure the retaining ring sits on the middle of the oil seal. On the Sequoia you just press it all the way down until you get everything set in place. Check out my thread below for some pictures and more indepth discussion. Let me know about any questions.

Ok, so the 2nd tool you made, you used the flange of the old bearing to rest on the cross beams of the press, and the smaller circle you welded on top to push against the retaining ring to press it on?

Also, when using the 1st tool, did you use any kind of bearing splitter to get the ABS ring and top retainer off first before pressing out the bearing itself?
 

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Ok, so the 2nd tool you made, you used the flange of the old bearing to rest on the cross beams of the press, and the smaller circle you welded on top to push against the retaining ring to press it on?

Also, when using the 1st tool, did you use any kind of bearing splitter to get the ABS ring and top retainer off first before pressing out the bearing itself?
That is correct for the re-installation tool. The interior end of axle shaft was pointed towards the ground and I pressed the entire assembly into the retaining rings/ABS ring. I think I also had to use a punch to make sure everything was evenly seated. I don't think I have a picture of that part.

I just carefully cut all of the rings off with a small cutoff wheel. The tools you see on eBay for 4Runners, etc. are able to press them off but I couldn't find an easy way to do it on the Sequoia. They weren't that expensive to buy new. I just went to a local Toyota dealer and got them from the parts counter.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
That is correct for the re-installation tool. The interior end of axle shaft was pointed towards the ground and I pressed the entire assembly into the retaining rings/ABS ring. I think I also had to use a punch to make sure everything was evenly seated. I don't think I have a picture of that part.

I just carefully cut all of the rings off with a small cutoff wheel. The tools you see on eBay for 4Runners, etc. are able to press them off but I couldn't find an easy way to do it on the Sequoia. They weren't that expensive to buy new. I just went to a local Toyota dealer and got them from the parts counter.
Thanks!

I also want to share what I found since I last posted. Timmy the Toolman now has a link to an ebay store for the tools to do this on his youtube video for the 3rd gen 4runner. I looked the guy up on ebay, and he also makes these tools with special adapters to use on the Sequoia. He even has a specially sized attachment for pulling the ABS ring on the Sequoia. I have messaged the guy a couple times, and he seems to know his stuff and understand the differences in the Sequoia. I have NOT used his product yet, so this is not an endorsement, but if I do this job myself, I plan on buying his tools to do it (since I don't weld, though this would be a good excuse to buy a welder).

Link to guy on ebay for those interested (seller name is donald-the-bonald): https://www.ebay.com/usr/donald-the-bonald?ul_noapp=true

If you're going to go with the ebay guy, I'd recommend reaching out to him to make sure you're getting the right stuff for the Sequoia specifically.
 

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Thanks!

I also want to share what I found since I last posted. Timmy the Toolman now has a link to an ebay store for the tools to do this on his youtube video for the 3rd gen 4runner. I looked the guy up on ebay, and he also makes these tools with special adapters to use on the Sequoia. He even has a specially sized attachment for pulling the ABS ring on the Sequoia. I have messaged the guy a couple times, and he seems to know his stuff and understand the differences in the Sequoia. I have NOT used his product yet, so this is not an endorsement, but if I do this job myself, I plan on buying his tools to do it (since I don't weld, though this would be a good excuse to buy a welder).

Link to guy on ebay for those interested (seller name is donald-the-bonald): https://www.ebay.com/usr/donald-the-bonald?ul_noapp=true

If you're going to go with the ebay guy, I'd recommend reaching out to him to make sure you're getting the right stuff for the Sequoia specifically.
Oh man!!! I would've gladly spent ~$200 for those tools. I only made them because I couldn't find another option. It was a lot of trouble. I almost spent close to $400 on another eBay tool before I found out that one didn't work on Sequoias.
 

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A lot of my "shaking" or vibrating came from out of balance tires. But even with new tires it still does it a tiny bit when the weight is lower (when gas tank is almost empty and I'm not carrying passengers or a load). Is that alignment or bearings or both?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
A lot of my "shaking" or vibrating came from out of balance tires. But even with new tires it still does it a tiny bit when the weight is lower (when gas tank is almost empty and I'm not carrying passengers or a load). Is that alignment or bearings or both?
I haven’t fully addressed this and haven’t had much time too mess with it. But I did take it to an actual Toyota dealership for a road force balance and the vibration got better. It’s still there sometimes but good enough now that my wife isn't constantly complaining about it.
 

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I haven’t fully addressed this and haven’t had much time too mess with it. But I did take it to an actual Toyota dealership for a road force balance and the vibration got better. It’s still there sometimes but good enough now that my wife isn't constantly complaining about it.
Thanks!
 

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CV axles that leak out grease means they leak in water. Water destroys them. This could be where vibration is coming from. I assume you have checked your tie rod ends for slack, how are the steering rack bushings? All suspension parts tight/no slip? Ball joints, control arm bushings?
 
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