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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,
We are looking at a Travel Trailer for our 2006 double cab 4x4. Max towing says 6700 in the manual. We would like a 25-26' trailer similar to this one 2004 Trail Bay 27DS Travel Trailer . Dry weight about 5200 lbs, add another 1000 in the trailer for camping gear puts it at 6200 lbs. Then load the truck up with kids and firewood, bikes etc. Is this doable?

I would get a load leveling hitch if that would help. Will being up near the max be bad for the truck? We plan an average caping trip around 180 miles each way, next year a 1000 mile trip each way etc.

It looks like some have hauled trailers of this weight around and other say they wouldn't go above 4500 or so with the '06.

Feedback??
 

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When I had my 2005 DC 4x2 SR5, I started towing with a pop-up. Then got a 23' hybrid travel trailer that weighed 5600 lbs, then got a 32' travel trailer that weighs 6200 lbs ready to camp. The 2005 did great with the pup. It did ok with the 23'. It was maxed out and not comfortable with the 32' trailer. I'd like to say it was the weight or the length or the power or the whatever, but I think it was the combo of pushing all of the limits at the same time. I was not happy towing that 32 footer with the 2005. I have since bought a 2008 DC and I am a happy tower once again.

Ok, so what are my thoughts for you. Based on your input, you sound like me. I towed with 4 people, 2 dogs, generator, bikes, chairs, blue-tote, firewood, gas, scooters and whatever else would fit in the bed of the truck. I'm suprised I had any payload capacity left to handle the hitch weight. I think I gained enough experience towing at or above my 2005's limits to offer some pointers.

1. <6,000 GVW on the trailer and <700 lbs on the hitch weight will serve you well. Going heavier on the GVW (say 6,200 lbs you listed above) will not be a showstopper. The added hitch weight that results from the higher GVW will. It's a catch 22. You need hitch weight to maintain stability. You really want 12-13% on the hitch for good stability. For a 6200 lbs trailer, that's 744 lbs hitch weight and that's right at the limit of your Tundra. That's the catch 22. I think the gen1 Tundra pulls 7,000 lbs just fine. I think the hitch weight that you get from that 7,000 lbs trailer is too much for the gen 1. Unless it's a boat. So, that's why I set the max trailer GVW at about 6,000 lbs. That's where you hit your hitch limit. So, what's the real hitch weight on that trailer (not what's in a brochure or dry hitch weight). If you can keep that below 700-740 lbs all loaded and ready to camp and the trailer is stable at that hitch weight, then I would say you're good to go.

2. Length: When the 32' trailer I have now was empty, it weighed about 5600 lbs and the hitch weight was right at 700 lbs. I towed it home from Ohio to MD (through Cumberland) and it did not behave as well as I would have hoped. I had a well adjusted Equal-i-zer and the weights were perfect. But that is a big trailer for a gen 1. For you, stay below 30 overall length.

3. replace P rated tires. bouncy and unstable while towing heavy.

4. airbags don't do squat (or anti-squat). I thought they did, but they didn't. A well adjusted WDH is a better system.

5. Towing max'd out or over all the limits was not fun. I was over my GVWR and GCWR. I was at my FAWR and RAWR. I had about the longest trailer I would dare tow with the gen1 DC wheelbase. My hitch weight was maxed out. THe bed was full of stuff, the cab was full of water bags (people, pets). I think it was safe, but it sure wasn't fun.

Hope that helps.

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thats great information. I ended up getting a trailer with 5050 dry weight, 670lb hitch weight, and 28.5' long. So based on what you said I should be oK.

Now you said something about the tires. Here are my tires. I'm not sure if those are ok or not.

HT-760 Bravo Series

Your thoughts?

Korey
 

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Korey, which specific part number tire do you have? Some are 35 psi, some are 44 psi. If you have the 35 psi ones, I would get LT C rated tires to replace them straight away. If you have the 44 psi tires, I would replace them with LT C rated tires when they wear out. The LT tires really cut down on bounce and add some stability while towing. I towed the 23' trailer with P rated tires (44 psi), but no way I would have towed the 32' trailer with P rated tires.

Tom
 

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I towed my Wildwood 26BH X-Lite from Chicago to Seattle (and back) last summer. It's listed as weighing 4,300 lbs dry, but manufacturers always seem to under-estimate their dry weights, and nobody travels completely dry anyway. That, and they disregard any options you might order.

Anyway, with 4 people (me, wife and 2 kids) and roughly 900 lbs of gear, clothing and stuff needed for a 2 week trip, my 2006 Tundra DC 4X4 did great throuout the entire trip. All together, we weighed about 11,200 lbs, including ourselves in the truck and a full tank of gas.

Here's my set up in this thread...

http://www.tundrasolutions.com/forums/1267301-post56/

If you plan on doing steep hills or mountains, I'd go for a lightweight trailer.
 
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