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I have a 2006 tundra, V-8 with 52,000 miles on it. Dealer is recommending the timing belt and water pump be replaced due to age. We don't drive it a lot of miles so I am debating whether this should be done now or wait until the mileage gets closer to the 90k range. Also, I can seem to get a definitive answer as to whether this is an interference engine or not.

Thanks,
C
 

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I have a 2006 tundra, V-8 with 52,000 miles on it. Dealer is recommending the timing belt and water pump be replaced due to age. We don't drive it a lot of miles so I am debating whether this should be done now or wait until the mileage gets closer to the 90k range. Also, I can seem to get a definitive answer as to whether this is an interference engine or not.

Thanks,
C
doesnt make sense to me. i have a 2003 Tundra with about 200K miles. im now preparing to do a second timing belt replacement.
 

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Didn’t mean to be cryptic. I replaced the first belt around 90-95k miles. I now have about 105k on that belt. I’m preparing to replace it again. The 50k mile replacement seems aggressive. Maybe the dealer is assuming something we don’t. The way I read it, it sounded like the dealer suggested replacement based upon age, not mileage. I’ve not seen that published in anything I’ve read. Yet, I’m not a master Toyota mechanic.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
Tha
Didn’t mean to be cryptic. I replaced the first belt around 90-95k miles. I now have about 105k on that belt. I’m preparing to replace it again. The 50k mile replacement seems aggressive. Maybe the dealer is assuming something we don’t. The way I read it, it sounded like the dealer suggested replacement based upon age, not mileage. I’ve not seen that published in anything I’ve read. Yet, I’m not a master Toyota mechanic.
thank you for clarifying.
 

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Rubber does degrade over time and you're talking about a 14 piece of rubber here so yes, most definitely time to replace it. I am not a mechanic but every thread I have read on here does say the V8 IS an interference engine. Cant find it right now but I have seen pictures on here of engines destroyed when the belt let go.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Rubber does degrade over time and you're talking about a 14 piece of rubber here so yes, most definitely time to replace it. But I cant answer the other question regarding interference either. Obviously if it was I would get on it soon. Hopefully someone else can chime in that knows for sure.
Thank you. Hopefully someone will answer who know if it is an interference engine.
 

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I have no way of proving this;

I've been told over and over again the Tundra 4.7L V8 engine is indeed an interference engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I have no way of proving this;

I've been told over and over again the Tundra 4.7L V8 engine is indeed an interference engine.
Thanks for commenting on this. I have heard it is and it isn't. Wonder why this is not clear.
 

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I recently bought a 2006 Tundra double cab 2WD 4.7L with 107k. Lots of real good maintenance history but not able to find any records of the timing belt and water pump being replaced. What is a ballpark price to pay for that total job using OEM Toyota parts along with the tensioners, idlers etc?
 

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Thanks for commenting on this. I have heard it is and it isn't. Wonder why this is not clear.
Not trying to be a dick but I did say yes, it is one, I cant find all threads that say that, or the really good one with pictures of a grenaded engine, but you still have a 14 year old piece of rubber that could potentially cost you over $4 grand if it lets go. If I were in your shoes I would booking the service now and not waiting for 10 people to tell me its an interference engine. If you dont believe me you can always do a search on this site and you can find some of those threads that prove it.
Read the first post on this thread.

Read post 19 on this thread.

Post 1 and Post 15
 
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Toyota

1.5L (1A-C, 3A-C & 3E) Interference
• 1.5L (3E-E & 5E-FE) Non-Interference
• 1.6L DOHC (4A-F & 4A-FE) Non-Interference
• 1.6L DOHC (4A-GE & 4A-GZE) Non-Interference
• 1.6L SOHC Non-Interference
• 1.8L Diesel Interference
• 1.8L DOHC Gasoline Interference
1.8L 7AFE, 4AFE, 4AF – Non Interference
• 2.0L Non-Interference
• 2.2L Diesel Interference
• 2.2L Gasoline Non-Interference
• 2.4L Diesel Interference
• 2.5L Non-Interference
• 2.8L Non-Interference
• 3.0L Inline 6 (Except 1998 2JZ-GE) Non-Interference
• 3.0L Inline 6 VVT-i (1998 2JZ-GE) Interference
• 3.0L V6 Non-Interference
• 3.3L 3MZ-FE V6 W/ V VTi – Interference
• 3.4L Non-Interference
* 3.5L V-6 Non-Interference
• 4.7L Interference
 

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Do the belt and pump... should cost about 600 to 800. Why ask for trouble???
My compadre's a contrarian.
He's forgotten more about mechanical stuff than I'll ever know. I'm a 'shade tree' mechanic at best.
He had the timing belt service on his Taco completed by a local shop and the bill nearly bowled him over.
"They didn't need to include all these ancillary parts like the tensioner, idler and water pump on this job just to increase the price!"
My reply;
"It's cheap insurance against a timing belt failure."
His reply,
"No it's not !"

Several years later we revisited this scenario and he agreed ~ You're right ! I thought that was really 'Big' of him.
 

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I recently bought a 2006 Tundra double cab 2WD 4.7L with 107k. Lots of real good maintenance history but not able to find any records of the timing belt and water pump being replaced. What is a ballpark price to pay for that total job using OEM Toyota parts along with the tensioners, idlers etc?
From a dealer depending on your area anywhere from $800-1400. There are Aisin kits out there that use OEM parts without the Toyota stamp for cheaper if you have a trusted mechanic to install them.
 

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I will also add that tensioners can fail, weep holes (water pump) leaks can happen that also have the potential to degrade and/or suddenly cause t-belt disaster.

I have seen so many threads on tacoma forums, ih8mud, here and elsewhere that say it is AND is not an interference motor. I've also seen just as many cases where folks have broken belts and gotten away unscathed but ONLY from the pre VVTi motors. I have not yet seen anyone break a t belt on a 05+ motor and post any results from that yet.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I
Not trying to be a dick but I did say yes, it is one, I cant find all threads that say that, or the really good one with pictures of a grenaded engine, but you still have a 14 year old piece of rubber that could potentially cost you over $4 grand if it lets go. If I were in your shoes I would booking the service now and not waiting for 10 people to tell me its an interference engine. If you dont believe me you can always do a search on this site and you can find some of those threads that prove it.
Read the first post on this thread.

Read post 19 on this thread.

Post 1 and Post 15
I wasn't implying that I didn't believe you. I have read several threads on this site and read other searches where dealers have stated it is not an interference engine. When I said I wonder why it isn't clear, I was referring to why it is a debated subject. Toyota should have a clear answer but they don't seem to on this issue. Thank you for taking time to reply and attaching links.
 

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I would replace it. It does degrade with time, not just use. Even going off of Toyota recommendations, I think it’s either 6 or 7 years is the longest they recommend. People go longer all the time obviously, people also routinely go 250,000 miles before replacing one. They’ll do it, but do you wanna chance being the person that lost that bet? They are interference. If you lose the bet, it ain’t a cheap bet. I would replace it.


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Discussion Starter #19
I would replace it. It does degrade with time, not just use. Even going off of Toyota recommendations, I think it’s either 6 or 7 years is the longest they recommend. People go longer all the time obviously, people also routinely go 250,000 miles before replacing one. They’ll do it, but do you wanna chance being the person that lost that bet? They are interference. If you lose the bet, it ain’t a cheap bet. I would replace it.


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Thank you
 

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I feel like this horse has been beaten to a pulp by now but I’ll throw my $.02 into the pile here too.

I, like you, have a really low mileage truck on the original timing belt—a May 99 build date (low 4000’s VIN) with 81,000 miles. I bought it in 2017 with 56k, and I drive about 10-12k on the highway and country roads per year. Got it from the late original owner who used it as a weekend show truck—go figure. I don’t tow, haul, speed, spin the wheels, rev the engine (more than a little), etc. I’m also extremely diligent about putting fresh Mobil 1 full synthetic in every 7500 miles, greasing fittings, cleaning undercarriage, rotating tires, etc. I take excellent care of my Tundra.

Because it’s so close, I’m waiting until May or June to put a belt in my truck at about 86-88k. I’m not really worried about it to be honest. That being said, this is an interference engine—many of the people who report not having damage were lucky, which is certainly possible too. It seems to me (purely anecdotally) like a lot of the breakages I’ve read about here (not all) have happened on cold starts in the morning...maybe the belt is so stiff and brittle it just gives up when cranked over. Of course any valve-piston contact can be potentially damaging but if things are spinning at 2, 3, 4, or 5000rpm that’s a whole lot more energy colliding than at 500-1000.

Take everyone’s advice with a grain of salt as you would any other subject. Cheaper than buying a motor? Absolutely. Worth doing? Maybe that depends on your budget. If the 800-1200 is not a big deal and you love/plan to keep the truck, do it and don’t look back. If you see yourself selling it next year, I 100% wouldn’t bother (and would drive it worry-free in the meantime).
 
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