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Discussion Starter #1
I would like to tow my (4800 lbs dry) travel trailer with an ATV (520 lbs) in the bed. I'm not concerned about exceeding the 16000 lbs GCVWR, but I am concerned about going over the maximum payload. I still don't even know for sure what that is. I see according to most sites, its 1495, but the manual says the payload is less than that for mine. (4X4 limited with sunroof - it actually says the sunroof reduces the payload)

I have a few questions:
1) Has anyone done this and if so, do you have any tips?
2) I read in the manual the GCVWR is 16000 lbs and the sticker on the door says the GVWR for the truck is 7200. Does anyone know for sure how to determine the dry weight of the truck without a scale? I'm hoping the maximum payload really is 1495.
3) I have a weight distribution hitch for the trailer. It says that I can count 10% or 480 lbs (dry) toward my tongue wight. However, can't I divide this in half since the distribution shares that weight with the truck and the trailer?
4) Has anyone put an ATV on the back of the trailer. It looks like if I put a couple receiver hitches between the back bumper and the first cross beam (4 inces apart) I could then get some 2" stock to go past the next two cross beams on the trailer so the extra weight wouldn't damage the trailer. The down force would only be on the very back, and the long 2" stock would stabalize the weight with upward pressure on the next two beams. You can have something extend up to 6 feet over the back in Arizona so the length isn't an issue. I'm just concerned how much the atv will bounce back there and what impact this would have on the towing.

Thanks

Bill
 

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I do it all the time(quad in truck) with trailer very close to that weight and no weight distribution hitch.If truck squats adjust your hitch and make sure your trailer brakes are working properly.One thing is how can you fit a quad in back of Crewmax?I have a double cab and can close tailgate.
 

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They make an 18" extension for the hitch using a solid steel 2" insert that allows you to tow 7K lbs (which is my max trailer weight) as long as you have a weight distribution hitch. That would allow me to pull with the tail gate down. I still have my reservations about using the extension too, but will look into it if I can tow with the atv legally. You don't have any pics do you?
 

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When pulling my travel trailer (DC) I can't lower my tailgate without hitting the tongue jack. If you can get your gate down while hooked up I'd be careful about clearance when turning sharp.

Good luck,

Warren
 

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They make an 18" extension for the hitch using a solid steel 2" insert that allows you to tow 7K lbs (which is my max trailer weight) as long as you have a weight distribution hitch. That would allow me to pull with the tail gate down. I still have my reservations about using the extension too, but will look into it if I can tow with the atv legally. You don't have any pics do you?
Everyone has their own individual margin of safety. An 18" extension is a *lot* of additional leverage (read stress) on your receiver. Assuming this 18" extension is well engineered, assuming the WD hitch is adjusted properly, and assuming you haven't underestimated your actual bed, tongue, or tow weight . . . you may be able to assume a certain margin of safety. That's a lot of assumptions.

Let's assume your Tundra has a payload capacity of 1400 lbs. Assume 325 lbs. for two passengers, 520 lbs. for your ATV, and conservatively subtract 150 lbs. for misc. gear. That only leaves you with 405 lbs. of payload remaining. 405 lbs. is the minimum recommended tongue weight for a 4,050 lb. trailer. This is assuming you're willing to max out everything with no margin for error or safety.

Many assume the numbers and specs they've read on various brochures are accurate. I've found most manufacturers underestimate the real-world empty/dry/UVW weights of their TT's and toy haulers. For instance, Jayco advertises their Octane 161 toy hauler as one of the lightest toy haulers on the market with a empty/dry/UVW of 3530 lbs. I have yet to see one weigh-in less than 4,100 lbs. (this is with no gear and no water). To add insult to safety, some manufacturers even *subtract* the static tongue weight from their so-called empty/dry/UVW figures. Also, a manufacturer may rate the tongue weight of a particular trailer (dry/empty) at 750 lbs. Simply filling your water tanks and/or improperly loading your gear (especially on a larger toy hauler) can easily, and quickly, have your tongue weight soar to over 1200-1500 lbs.

Bottom line, I wouldn't assume anything when it comes to your safety--it's a good idea to get your gear accurately weighed (truck, trailer, and tongue, separately) on an accurate scale (as configured for the road with all gear, water, and BS loaded in-place) at least once.

At the end of October, gen2 Tundra 5.7 owners will have bragging rights to a 300,000 lb. tow capacity (Toyota Tundra can (and will) pull a Space Shuttle). You can bet Toyota's legal department has their disclaimers ready to go--lol!!
 
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