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Discussion Starter #21 (Edited)
Been extending the capability of our truck for some upcoming outings.

Installed RCI skid plates...


Compared to the factory "skid plate", which would probably protect from dandelions, but not much else. :wink2:


Installed.


One bit of advice with this kit: when I was installing the Transmission/Transfer-Case plate, I had to seat it as far as possible to the rear (shifting it to the rear of the mounting holes) in order to get it clear of the back of the transfer case as in this following picture.


It's a 3 piece set, but only 2 part numbers.
- 07-17 Tundra Engine Skid Plate (2 pieces), $255
- 07-17 Tundra Transmission/Transfer-Case Skid Plate (includes cross-member), $325

Bought them from my local shop (Sierra Expeditions), so there was no shipping fee.

Top quality, and install was quite easy. Can't wait to get out and "test 'em".
 

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Discussion Starter #22 (Edited)
Also relocated (raised) all my breathers. One off-road route I want to do soon that involves several river crossings, so I don’t want to take chances with getting water sucked into diffs, transmission, or transfer case.


Not sure if there’s already a posting on this topic, but here’s what I did...

Spent quite a bit of time scouring parts diagrams, and climbing around under my rig. As far as I can tell, there are 6 breathers.
- Two mounted in the engine compartment on the driver’s side wheel well for the front diff.
- One on top of the transmission and two on the transfer case that are mounted together on the top back of the transmission…maybe back of the engine. Very hard to get to, but fortunately I could just squeeze my arm in there from underneath.
- And one on top of the rear diff.

Most just required some ¼” and 5/32” fuel line or vacuum hose, except the rear diff.
I bought 16’ of 5/32” vacuum line, and 8’ of ¼” fuel line (but vacuum hose would have worked too).


The rear diff required Toyota part number 90404-51319 ($6.88 at ToyotaPartsDeal.com, my go-to for factory parts). It’s a “union” that replaces the breather on the rear diff. Connected 16’ of 5/16” fuel line and ran it along the brake line to the engine compartment, then screwed the breather into the end of it.





The rear was easy once I got the parts, and the two that were on the wheel well, nothing to it. The three on the transmission and transfer case were a booger to get to.

On all of them, I fed the line from the driver's side of the engine compartment, then got underneath and pulled what I needed to get to the connection point. Then went back and zip tied as much as I could to keep the lines safe.

Hope that helps!
 

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Nice installation. The Sequoia transfer case is 1.25 inches longer than the Tundra transfer case (TC). (This is from the AWD Tundra thread where guys are installing Sequoia transfer cases in their Tundras; in order to make that work they have to shorten the rear drive shaft by 1.25 inches.) See:

AWD conversion completed - TundraTalk.net - Toyota Tundra Discussion Forum

So you are saying you got that regular Tundra Trans/TC skid to work on the Sequoia. I'm surprised there is enough adjustment to make it clear the rear of the transfer case. I had assumed that RCI would have to make a custom extended-length version to fit the Sequoia.

What is your impression of the stiffness of this cantilevered transfer-case skid design? If you gently lift the back of the skid with a floor jack doesn't it just flex until it touches the transfer case? (Just trying to visualize what would happen if you landed on a large rock.) I always thought that the TC skid would need an additional cross member (like provided on the BudBuilt TC skid) to provide enough protection to be worthwhile. Your thoughts?
 
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The rear diff required Toyota part number 90404-51319 ($6.88 at ToyotaPartsDeal.com, my go-to for factory parts). It’s a “union” that replaces the breather on the rear diff. Connected 16’ of 5/16” fuel line and ran it along the brake line to the engine compartment, then screwed the breather into the end of it.
For the rear an optional approach is to use 90404-51319 together with 90930-03136 which is a breather with a hose barb fitting. See:

diy-rear-differential-breather-mod

I'm planning to route mine alongside the wire harness running up into the left rear tail light area. Will have to look for the breathers you found on the transmission and transfer case. Thanks for the useful information!
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Nice installation. The Sequoia transfer case is 1.25 inches longer than the Tundra transfer case (TC). (This is from the AWD Tundra thread where guys are installing Sequoia transfer cases in their Tundras; in order to make that work they have to shorten the rear drive shaft by 1.25 inches.) See:

AWD conversion completed - TundraTalk.net - Toyota Tundra Discussion Forum

So you are saying you got that regular Tundra Trans/TC skid to work on the Sequoia. I'm surprised there is enough adjustment to make it clear the rear of the transfer case. I had assumed that RCI would have to make a custom extended-length version to fit the Sequoia.

What is your impression of the stiffness of this cantilevered transfer-case skid design? If you gently lift the back of the skid with a floor jack doesn't it just flex until it touches the transfer case? (Just trying to visualize what would happen if you landed on a large rock.) I always thought that the TC skid would need an additional cross member (like provided on the BudBuilt TC skid) to provide enough protection to be worthwhile. Your thoughts?
I spoke to the guys at RCI and at Bud Built. Both said their Tundra skids would work on my Sequoia, and I was unaware of that dimensional difference, so I guess it's dumb-luck on my part. It did occur to me that the transfer case skid could stand to be about an inch longer for a little more comfortable spacing. Candidly, I think the BudBuilt is probably a little more stout, but I was trying to balance protection, cost and weight. BudBuilt is ~$200 more for the same amount of coverage, and added weight I couldn't afford. I got some feedback from others running the RCI products and industry pros, and all felt they were more than adequately strong based on practical experience. I generally run really slow in those sort of scenarios and am quick on the left-foot braking when I'm creeping over anything that could do significant damage, so IMHO, the odds are in favor of it providing adequate protection. Of course, if I hit it hard, it's a 14mm socket and sledge hammer fix! Realistically, it's infinitely more protection than the factory "shield", which I had to remove to make the skid plate fit. Also, I forgot to mention that I added 3 washers to each rear skid mounting bolt for just a little extra spacing off the transfer case. I'd estimate there's about 1/2" clearance off the transfer case. All in all, perhaps not a perfect solution, but provided the best balance for my needs. Hope that helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
For the rear an optional approach is to use 90404-51319 together with 90930-03136 which is a breather with a hose barb fitting. See:

diy-rear-differential-breather-mod

I'm planning to route mine alongside the wire harness running up into the left rear tail light area. Will have to look for the breathers you found on the transmission and transfer case. Thanks for the useful information!
I figured there was a write up already! I always admire how well you know all the great content on this forum.

Nonetheless, I just started getting into it and ran with what I found. I ordered what I thought was the right barbed breather (90930-03159), but it turned out to be ~1/4" barb, so it didn't fit the same sized hose as the union. In a pinch, I found that just threading the original breather into the end of the hose provided a really secure fit, and so I think that'll do the trick.

I looked at running up into the tail light, but couldn't find an opening, and I didn't want to drill it. Just figured I'd run it to the engine with the others. I didn't think about running it with the wiring harness, but I'd guess you'll be able to find an access point with that approach.

If you plan ahead, you can get the hose a lot cheaper on Rock Auto. I paid a bit of a premium to buy it all at the local Napa and O'Reilly.
 

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- One on top of the transmission and two on the transfer case that are mounted together on the top back of the transmission…maybe back of the engine. Very hard to get to, but fortunately I could just squeeze my arm in there from underneath.
Looked for the three hidden breathers. All I found was the one with a blue dot. It was mounted high in the engine compartment at the back of the engine (see photos). Plenty high enough for my purposes so I won't mess with it. Presumably this one is for the transmission but I can't see enough back there to trace the hose to its source.

Can you provide any more detail on where to look for the other two transfer case breathers? I looked from below with a flashlight and inspection mirror and couldn't find anything. Thanks for any guidance you can give.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Looked for the three hidden breathers. All I found was the one with a blue dot. It was mounted high in the engine compartment at the back of the engine (see photos). Plenty high enough for my purposes so I won't mess with it. Presumably this one is for the transmission but I can't see enough back there to trace the hose to its source.

Can you provide any more detail on where to look for the other two transfer case breathers? I looked from below with a flashlight and inspection mirror and couldn't find anything. Thanks for any guidance you can give.
Sorry for the delay in replying. Just got back from a few days on the trail!

I also had a breather with a blue tip, but it was MUCH lower on the back of the engine. I got to it from underneath. Not sure which I found first, but I think I followed one of the lines off the top of the transfer case, and then discovered the other two that terminated at about the same place. For mine, that set of three breathers was just a few inches above the top of the transmission at the back of the motor. Probably 8-12 inches below the one you picture.

Perhaps it's different based on model year and engine size.

I've included two pictures. One shows one of the breather lines that attaches at two points around the front of the transfer case (note: the transmission breather is further to the front on mine, left of the picture). That pict is shot from the driver's side of the transmission. The other pict is of the back of the transfer case where a breather line goes to what I think is the transfer case controller. Both lines run together in the first pict.

Hope that helps.
 

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Sorry for the delay in replying. Just got back from a few days on the trail!

I also had a breather with a blue tip, but it was MUCH lower on the back of the engine. I got to it from underneath. Not sure which I found first, but I think I followed one of the lines off the top of the transfer case, and then discovered the other two that terminated at about the same place. For mine, that set of three breathers was just a few inches above the top of the transmission at the back of the motor. Probably 8-12 inches below the one you picture.

Perhaps it's different based on model year and engine size.

I've included two pictures. One shows one of the breather lines that attaches at two points around the front of the transfer case (note: the transmission breather is further to the front on mine, left of the picture). That pict is shot from the driver's side of the transmission. The other pict is of the back of the transfer case where a breather line goes to what I think is the transfer case controller. Both lines run together in the first pict.

Hope that helps.
Thank you so much for those pictures. I found the two lines off the transfer case and followed them to the top front of the transmission bell housing as you described. It turns out I have only one breather (for the transfer case) at the location where you had three. The other two lines continue higher; the one with the blue dot is the other transfer case breather. I still can't figure out where the transmission line terminates; it must be hidden somewhere at the back of the engine between the two transfer case breathers.

I'm estimating that the lowest front breather (transfer case) is about 32 inches off the ground. The OEM rear differential breather is about 24 inches off the ground. Certainly that rear one is the most exposed to water intrusion. I'm guessing that all should be well if I only relocate the rear one and stay away from water over 2 ft deep.

Kudos to you for relocating all of the front breathers. It must have been extremely difficult considering the poor access at those locations.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Thank you so much for those pictures. I found the two lines off the transfer case and followed them to the top front of the transmission bell housing as you described. It turns out I have only one breather (for the transfer case) at the location where you had three. The other two lines continue higher; the one with the blue dot is the other transfer case breather. I still can't figure out where the transmission line terminates; it must be hidden somewhere at the back of the engine between the two transfer case breathers.

I'm estimating that the lowest front breather (transfer case) is about 32 inches off the ground. The OEM rear differential breather is about 24 inches off the ground. Certainly that rear one is the most exposed to water intrusion. I'm guessing that all should be well if I only relocate the rear one and stay away from water over 2 ft deep.

Kudos to you for relocating all of the front breathers. It must have been extremely difficult considering the poor access at those locations.
My forearms looked like I'd fought with a cat by the time I was done!
 

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I spoke to the guys at RCI and at Bud Built. Both said their Tundra skids would work on my Sequoia, and I was unaware of that dimensional difference, so I guess it's dumb-luck on my part. It did occur to me that the transfer case skid could stand to be about an inch longer for a little more comfortable spacing. Candidly, I think the BudBuilt is probably a little more stout, but I was trying to balance protection, cost and weight. BudBuilt is ~$200 more for the same amount of coverage, and added weight I couldn't afford. I got some feedback from others running the RCI products and industry pros, and all felt they were more than adequately strong based on practical experience. I generally run really slow in those sort of scenarios and am quick on the left-foot braking when I'm creeping over anything that could do significant damage, so IMHO, the odds are in favor of it providing adequate protection. Of course, if I hit it hard, it's a 14mm socket and sledge hammer fix! Realistically, it's infinitely more protection than the factory "shield", which I had to remove to make the skid plate fit. Also, I forgot to mention that I added 3 washers to each rear skid mounting bolt for just a little extra spacing off the transfer case. I'd estimate there's about 1/2" clearance off the transfer case. All in all, perhaps not a perfect solution, but provided the best balance for my needs. Hope that helps.
I've been thinking about how the Sequoia transfer case skid might be improved. A desirable characteristic would be to provide continuous coverage from the front of the engine to the back of the gas tank. There shouldn't need to be a gap between the transfer case skid and the gas tank skid, which is an opportunity for either of these skids to get caught on an obstruction when moving forward or reversing. The reason the RCI and BudBuilt designs have this gap is that they originated with the Tundra, which typically (except RCSB) has at least two foot longer wheelbase than the Sequoia. Thus the Tundra with 26 gallon gas tank usually has about a two foot gap between the back of the transfer case and the front of the gas tank. On the Sequoia, the transfer case skid could bridge between the transmission cross member and the gas tank skid, thus eliminating the unnecessary extra cross member used on the BudBuilt or the weaker cantilevered design used by RCI.

It appears that the 26 gallon gas tank skid made by either RCI (first photo) or BudBuilt (second photo) would fit on the Sequoia with minor or no modifications. My Sequoia has the same 4 threaded mounting points on the frame as used by these skid plates. I have not yet confirmed whether they are in the exact same physical orientation, however. Has anyone put either of these gas tank skid plates on a Sequoia?

The P&P Engineering skid plate assembly for the Tundra with 38 gallon gas tank (3rd photo) is an example with continuous coverage. Because the front of the larger gas tank is directly behind the Tundra transfer case, the P&P transfer case skid (4th photo) spans directly between the transmission cross member and the gas tank skid. Photos are from:

https://p-p-engineering.myshopify.com/collections/toyota

https://www.tundras.com/threads/p-p-engineering-tundra-skid-plates.11041/

Based on inspiration from the P&P design, it seems to me that a similar continuous bridging transfer case skid for the Sequoia could be adapted to the RCI or BudBuilt gas tank skids. Please post any comments or suggestions (pro or con).
 

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Not trying to hijack this thread, but I'm trying to decide on which rack to get and two of my top options are in this thread :coola:

@n2thewild
- How do you like the Baja Rack? Does it cover the sunroof? How secure does the basket feel on the factory roof rails?

@dworrel - Any regrets dropping the coin on the Gobi Rack? It looks like the best option for my needs, but that is a lot of money to throw down without any real-world feedback.
 

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Discussion Starter #33 (Edited)
Hey Blindranger - The Baja Rack works great. I have the MegaMule, and it fits nice and tight on the factory crossmembers. I'm sure I've overloaded it consistently with respect to the Toyota specs on the roof rack load limit, but zero problems after thousands of miles and hard trail driving. Obviously the Baja Rack doesn't change the load limits of the factory components, but it certainly increases your opportunity to exceed it! I don't have a sunroof, but it wouldn't cover it if I did; it's just not that big.

That's the rub for us, size, load limit and application flexibility. I will be replacing it soon, but I'm currently on the fence between Front Runner and Rhino Rack. Front Runner is releasing a 2Gen Sequoia fitment any day now, so it'll completely replace all the factory components and allow me to install a roof top tent in addition to Maxtrax, fuel, water, or whatever the outing requires. Rhino Rack makes great stuff also, and is a more aerodynamic rack. My local 4x4 shop owner has one Toyo with each rack on it and prefers the Rhino Rack, but the fitment and accessories of the Front Runner are pulling me in.

Either of them are significantly lighter than the steel Baja Rack, and lower profile (without the siderail options).

Hope that helps.
 

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I love the setup here. We don't really do any off-roading of this nature yet, but I would like to get the family outdoors a little more often.

With respect to the lift kits, are any of you seeing any premature wear or drivability issues with them? Specifically the CV's, wheel bearings or anything else? I am considering doing a lift and am just curious about pitfall potential aside from reduced mileage.

Also, are you guys reprogramming the tire size in the computer?
 

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I started another thread but this upcoming Wednesday I will be meeting with a company that designs skid plates and other off road implements for Tacoma's, etc. If any of you are looking for a custom skid plate, etc. that doesn't exist please let them know and they can measure off my vehicle and maybe develop something that doesn't exist.
 

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Hey Blindranger - The Baja Rack works great. I have the MegaMule, and it fits nice and tight on the factory crossmembers. I'm sure I've overloaded it consistently with respect to the Toyota specs on the roof rack load limit, but zero problems after thousands of miles and hard trail driving. Obviously the Baja Rack doesn't change the load limits of the factory components, but it certainly increases your opportunity to exceed it! I don't have a sunroof, but it wouldn't cover it if I did; it's just not that big.

That's the rub for us, size, load limit and application flexibility. I will be replacing it soon, but I'm currently on the fence between Front Runner and Rhino Rack. Front Runner is releasing a 2Gen Sequoia fitment any day now, so it'll completely replace all the factory components and allow me to install a roof top tent in addition to Maxtrax, fuel, water, or whatever the outing requires. Rhino Rack makes great stuff also, and is a more aerodynamic rack. My local 4x4 shop owner has one Toyo with each rack on it and prefers the Rhino Rack, but the fitment and accessories of the Front Runner are pulling me in.

Either of them are significantly lighter than the steel Baja Rack, and lower profile (without the siderail options).

Hope that helps.
Thanks for the feedback! Now the debate is between Front Runner and Rhino Rack!
 

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Here are some pics of mine. Not trying to hijack your thread. Mine started out as a 2008 Platinum.

Gobi roof rack -Stealth
4-direction LED lights
ICI Bumper (for Tundra modified to fit)
Kevlar finish (adds ~100lbs weight but scratch resistant)
Revtek leveling kit (2" lift in front with rear adjustment of air suspension)
Added a 2" receiver to the front for road feeder used for hunting in Texas
Insulated doors which makes a big difference for interior noise
Powder coated factory rims. Full size spare fits underneath (surprisingly)
Turtleback trailer mounted behind - bought matching rims for trailer off eBay so all are interchangeable



I think your ride is as cool as hell! congrats.:surprise:
 

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Discussion Starter #38
I love the setup here. We don't really do any off-roading of this nature yet, but I would like to get the family outdoors a little more often.

With respect to the lift kits, are any of you seeing any premature wear or drivability issues with them? Specifically the CV's, wheel bearings or anything else? I am considering doing a lift and am just curious about pitfall potential aside from reduced mileage.

Also, are you guys reprogramming the tire size in the computer?
Hi Sprech,

No wear issues so far. My 4x4 shop was pretty on-point about considering the wear implications when we designed the lift, but I'd bet I'm pushing the upper limit on how much you can lift without potential for drivetrain damage.

Driveability is a big upgrade. Even with the lift, 34" tires and lots of sidewall, the ride is great, better than factory for sure. Not as spongy as the factory ride, but I never liked that anyhow. Hit a bump in the road and the upgraded suspension absorbs it without the extra bounce that the factory ride exhibited.

All that said, I think we did the lift right. I've heard mixed reviews on spacers, but then it's a matter of whether the end result meets your needs and balancing that with cost. We went a tad expensive, but we're thrilled with the results and we boldly go where few Sequoias could dream of.

Regarding speedo re-calibration - I plan to get to that at some point, but I've determined my actual speed is about 4mph over what my speedo says, so I just keep that in mind when I'm setting my speed.

Good luck on planning your upgrades.
 

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Thanks for the info. Unfortunately most shops anymore seem to be hit or miss. The tires in the truck are new, so I’m not sure if I’m going to do anything just yet or not. Although it looks like the driver side front is sinking about a 1/2”, which seems weird, so if I’m going to get into it, I’m honking about just going all the way.
 

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Thanks for the info. Unfortunately most shops anymore seem to be hit or miss. The tires in the truck are new, so I’m not sure if I’m going to do anything just yet or not. Although it looks like the driver side front is sinking about a 1/2”, which seems weird, so if I’m going to get into it, I’m honking about just going all the way.
Driver's side lean is common. This is the main reason Coachbuilder shims were invented to correct it. Here is one of many threads on the subject:

Specific analysis: why does the tundra lean? - TundraTalk.net - Toyota Tundra Discussion Forum
 
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