Toyota Tundra Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Yep, almost afraid to post this, but I am interested in opinions (even the usual "get a 5.7") and also experiences of others that have towed travel trailers through the Rockies with Tundras, either 1st or 2nd gen, small or large engines, etc.

We are planning a 3000 mile trip this fall through the Rockies and back through the west coast towing our 24 foot Nash 22H with our 2010 Tundra DC 4WD. I have the truck equipped with a prodigy p3 controller, ride-rite air bags, Michelin AT2s, TRD sway bar, TRD air filter and am using an equal-i-zer hitch.

As I have posted before, I am quite happy with the performance the 4.6 has shown towing 6000 pounds. I have tested it in the Oregon cascades and through other mountain passes in our area up to 5000 feet or so, power was adequate even on 7% plus long grades, temp remained normal for both engine and trans. My weights are as follows for our fully loaded truck and trailer (me, wife, bikes, one canoe, eu2000i, 1/2 tank of water in trailer and fully loaded with 3 weeks worth of stuff).

Truck Front Axle: 3350lbs
Truck Rear Axle: 3650lbs (trailer hitched up and bars on)
Travel Trailer: 5400lbs (minus 700 lb hitch weight on truck)

This puts my truck right at or slightly over gvwr or 6900, and at 12400 lbs, 1600 pounds under the combined weight rating of 14000. I am also considerably under the 8300 pound rated max trailer weight listed. All in all, I feel the truck is maxed for all practical purposes when it comes to "comfortable" towing.

Overall, like I said, I am interested in others experiences, and of course opinions about my set up and how it will do in the rockies.

One last thing, all this said, while I am happy with the 4.6L, given the choice to do it over again today without loosing a bunch of $$, knowing what mileage I am getting as a daily driver (16.2 combined, 18 - 19.5 highway) I would likely opt for the 5.7.....right now my plan is to keep the 4.6 and our nash until 2014 and see what Toyota comes up with, hopefully a mid range diesel.

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
I have towed a similar trailer with my 07 tacoma with the 4.0 and 6 speed. It did quite well other than the fuel mileage. I only got up to about 7000 feet however. Never dropped below the speed limit and was able to regain speed if I got stuck behind a slower vehicle on a hill. I imagine that the 4.6 will do quite a bit better than my 4.0.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Could you be more specific about your route? I've just done Calgary - Vancouver back to Kamloops - Jasper - Grande Prairie back to Jasper then Calgary towing 35' / 7300LB travel trailer in a 2008 Seq 5.7 / Prodigy P2 / Reece Dual Cam. Previously had done similar in a Land Rover LR3 4.4 towing 26' 4500LB travel trailer.

The new 4.6 will be fine, its quite the motor - there's long climbs around Revelstoke and Golden - Yoho and Rogers passes. We flew over mostly on the limit ~100kmh. The only really sketchty part of the rockies is the strip from Golden to Lake Louise. Single lane, windy. The part that might surprise you is the #5 / Coquahala (sp?) from Hope to Kamloops. It has shorter but steeper grades, in my opinion, and gets quite windy.

Your mileage will suck. We saw 27L / 100KM over the 3000+KM we did. Go with premium. Gas is cheap around Kamloops, strangely.

It's a beautiful drive, enjoy! A loop over the rockies / #1 then back through the #3 via the #93 is a nice loop if you have time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Could you be more specific about your route?
Ok, thanks, Right now we are planning on going in through hwy 95 in Idaho, the on 3 through Nelson, staying in that area for a few days then back around on 3 to 93 up into the Banff area (I hear the locals call Banff - Be Aware Nothing For Free). We plan on staying in that area for 7 -8 days exploring, canoeing, hiking and biking. Then on around on 1 through to 97 and back down through Kelowna and on to the US and onto US 97 to the Lake Chelan area before heading home to Oregon. Not sure on the Kelowna area to head down through though yet....wondering what it is like in that area, if it is worth a visit and look see or not.

Any suggestions on good campgrounds around the Banff, Lake Louise area?

Besides the hills, main thing I am worried about is hiking in Bear country without my Glock! Guess I will get some bear spray, that should piss em off good!

Thanks again and appreciate the good words about the 4.6L.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Nelson rocks. Great food, biking, hiking, water. The info centre there sells a bike map, trails start right in town & both sides of the shore. Pulpit rock good hike with view but so many there. Salmo pass is arguably tougher tow thanrockies, the ferry alternate route is fun.

Kimberly riverside campground is a good midpoint between Nelson & banff. Great biking & hiking across the street in Kimberly reserve. Don't follow your gps from Nelson, it'll take you alongside st marys lake, get there off the #3. Again, good canoeing in st marys lake once there.

We've never camped in banff! Tunnel mountain is close into town, on the side of a hill, with not many trees but convenient. Minnewanka is close to a lake, as is two jacks for a more woodsy / lake experience. There's a couple of places east of banff in can more if you want to hike / bike that neck of the woods. When we're out there, we like to get away & stay out in Lake Louise. Great hiking & canoeing out there. Just past lake Louise is the train lookout.

Revelstoke & salmon arm on the way to kelowna are pretty neat. Lots to do in both places.

Kelowna.... is a busy busy place, esp after nelson & lake kootenay! Lots of water craft on lake okanagan, noisy. And hard to get a good camp spot. Fintry on the west bank is quiet. Of course the vineyards are worth a visit / tour. Let me have a think and get back to you! It's been a while. Hope this helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Oh, the bears! How many of you are there? We have three two legged & one four legged in our convoy. Bear bells, common sense, and spray - never used - will be fine. Just ask the rangers/ parks people. In the national parks they're very strict on no bear attractants on your campsite unattended. Bears keep out of your way if they hear you coming. Cougars, in other parts of BC are more problematic as they'll stalk.

Glock - i know the one, that's military in many part a of the world?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks! DinkelD this information is priceless for us. This trip it will be just the two of us, however we are on the lookout for a new four legged pet. I will buy some bear bells also! Thanks again, and by all means if you have any more suggestions, let me know.

Right now, I am possibly thinking of simply looping up through the lake louise area across for a ways on the 1 and back down again to the nelson area on 23 and 6, ending up heading west on 3 and dropping back into the us at Osoyoos or something and not even going into the Kelowna area. Seems there will be plenty to do just on that loop during the 14 days or so we will have in BC.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Lol you don't need to out run the bear...

Osoyoos & surroundings v nice, guaranteed a good time. Beer is expensive in BC, stock up prior! Don't bother doing ainsworth hot springs, kinda gross. If youre going that way to banff, white swann is a nice free hot spring. Enjoy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Easiest way to tell which bears are in the area

Black Bear SCAT has berries and squirrel fur

Grizzly SCAT has bells and smells like pepper.
Now thats funny!

Thanks all for the advice, we are heading out in a few days. Right now doing a bunch of prep work on the trailer, including changing out the crappy lippert axles it came with for dexters, fun....
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top