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Discussion Starter #1

We just purchased a new Sequoia Platinum, love it!
We traded in our 2007 Lexus GX470, which was a great car as well but did not have the towing capacity we need.
I should have done some additional research on the Sequoia drive set-up, but I didn't. Our GX had either the all wheel drive option or manually pull it into 4 wd lo or hi. The Sequoia is in either 2x4 with traction control or 4x4 (no driving on dry pavement). So when it's in 4x4 mode this is the same as a F350 I had when I got out and locked up the hubs? The only difference is, I do it from inside the truck? The manual tells you to drive in 4X4 mode once in a while to keep everything upfront lubricated. I don't believe it states that you must not do this on dry roads. The road to our house is not paved, gravel, so I put it in 4x4 mode and everything was good until I started up our paved driveway, immediatly I felt it grabbing and stopped driving right away and switched back to 2x4.
If someone could give me some direction how to best use this set-up, it would be appreciated.

Thanks!!
 

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You can drive in 4x4 all you want, the key is not switching between 4x2 and 4x4 at high speeds, i.e. below 60 mph. I myself come to a stop to switch. The benefit of not driving in 4x4 on a constant basis is gas mileage, other than that 4x2 and 4x4 can be used year around.
 

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As far as I understand, ANY shift on the fly 4x4 system should not really be used in a situation where traction is inherently easy, like a dry road.
 

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You can drive in 4x4 all you want, the key is not switching between 4x2 and 4x4 at high speeds, i.e. below 60 mph. I myself come to a stop to switch. The benefit of not driving in 4x4 on a constant basis is gas mileage, other than that 4x2 and 4x4 can be used year around.
For the Sequoia, this is correct. The problem is what Toyota calls 4 high is not really the same 4 high in other vehicles with part time transfer cases. It is essentially all wheel drive with a center coupling. It can be driven on dry roads and the traction control is not disabled. If you push the button on the dash that locks the center differential, that is part time 4 wheel drive and should not be driven on dry roads. The traction control is disabled.
 

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TJeeper hit it right on the nose.
The Sequoia system is typically called "multi-mode" four-wheel drive.
2H is rear wheel drive.
4H is all-wheel drive and can run all day long on any surface, including paved.
4H with the center diff locked is the same as a part-time four-wheel drive in High and should be driven on dirt/mud/snow only to allow for slippage of the wheels.
4L, as above, off-road only. 4L with center diff locked, off-road only.

It's a great system that allows use for a number of conditions. On dry pavement the 2H will save on gas and if it starts raining a twist of the knob gives you the traction and control of all-wheel drive.
 

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Also note that if the Sequoia is in AWD and becomes stuck (either alone or with the trailer) that it is a good idea to lock the center differential. If too much wheel spin is used, the center diff can be damaged while trying to extract the vehicle.
 

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Thanks for the information, Brian.
I have had several part-time 4wd trucks and my wife has had full-time rigs.
This is my first multi-selection so the added info. is always good.
BTW, I am very pleased and the truck is quite capable.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I'm not sure this infomation is completely correct, even though I wish it were. Reason: I had my 2010 Plat in 4H to do the recommended 100 mile intervals as stated in manual. I was driving down a dirt road and all is well, made a turn onto a paved driveway and heard a noise from the front wheels ,which did not sound to friendly. I immediatly stoped the truck and took it out of 4H on drove the rest of the way without any issues. I did not have the differential locked, so it wasn't that. If 4H is actually the same as AWD, why don't they just put that on the dail? I had a Yukon Denali which had 2wd, 4wd and AWD on the dail which made more sense.
I would like to hear from someone at Toyota (Tech) tell me I can drive on dry pavement all day long without any problems.


TJeeper hit it right on the nose.
The Sequoia system is typically called "multi-mode" four-wheel drive.
2H is rear wheel drive.
4H is all-wheel drive and can run all day long on any surface, including paved.
4H with the center diff locked is the same as a part-time four-wheel drive in High and should be driven on dirt/mud/snow only to allow for slippage of the wheels.
4L, as above, off-road only. 4L with center diff locked, off-road only.

It's a great system that allows use for a number of conditions. On dry pavement the 2H will save on gas and if it starts raining a twist of the knob gives you the traction and control of all-wheel drive.
 

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The noise sounds troublesome, laynlow, and I would take it to my dealer.

I just drove mine 400 miles at 70 mph in 4wd hi. I travel in my work and regularly put that kind of mileage on the Sequoia ('08 Limited).

Just some ready info that I grabbed for you:

“All Sequoias have a 6-speed automatic transmission and are available with rear-wheel drive or four-wheel drive that can be left engaged on dry pavement.” From ConsumerGuideAuto regarding the 2010 Sequoia.


“The 4WD system on the Sequoia features a Torsen limited-slip center differential. The system is a multi-mode, full-time 4WD system.” From JDPower regarding the 2008 Sequoia.
 

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I'm not sure this infomation is completely correct, even though I wish it were. Reason: I had my 2010 Plat in 4H to do the recommended 100 mile intervals as stated in manual. I was driving down a dirt road and all is well, made a turn onto a paved driveway and heard a noise from the front wheels ,which did not sound to friendly. I immediatly stoped the truck and took it out of 4H on drove the rest of the way without any issues. I did not have the differential locked, so it wasn't that. If 4H is actually the same as AWD, why don't they just put that on the dail? I had a Yukon Denali which had 2wd, 4wd and AWD on the dail which made more sense.
I would like to hear from someone at Toyota (Tech) tell me I can drive on dry pavement all day long without any problems.
Have you read the manual, or do you only rely on Toyota Techs for your information?

What kind of noise was coming from the front wheels? Rubber chirping or squealing, or was it metal grinding? How tight was the turn on the pavement?

The center coupling provides a 35/65 split (IIRC) between the front and rear axles, with the ability to transfer power to the axle that is slipping. Because power is constantly sent to both axles (as opposed to some other manufacturer's transfercases) on tight turns on pavement the front end will bind up a bit and the tires will chirp as the bind is released. This is normal. That is the drawback of such a transfercase. The benefit is better performance on snow and dirt.

I made the mistake once of doing a u-turn in 4hi on mostly dry pavement (center differential not locked) and found the same thing. The drivetrain was binding and the front end chirped through the turn like if it was in part time 4WD. I've learned not to put it in 4hi unless the driving conditions are poor.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I was making a tight right turn into my garage when I heard the noise. It was more of a binding/cracking noise then a tire slip /cherp sound from the garage floor. Owning only SUV's and Trucks for the past 20 years I can tell you it wasn't a sound I would be comfortable with hearing to often. MY wifes GX470 never made such a noise making the same manuvers, so I'm thinking something is surely different. Seeing that there is no reason I can think of for driving on dry pavement in 4WD, I'm sure everything will be fine.
 

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You're fine. My FJ Cruiser makes that same sound when making tight turns in 4hi. Doesn't hurt it. Done it for the last 70K miles. It just says not to use 4Lo on pavement but 4hi is ok. Now when's the locking rear diff coming along for the Seqoiua so I can buy one?
 
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