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We recently purchased a 2011 Tundra 2WD Crew Cab with a 5.7 V8 and Short Bed. The GVWR is 7000 lb. And the curb weight is 5335 lbs, leaving a payload capacity of 1665 lbs. The tundra is rated to tow 10,000 lbs. We also purchased a 2008 Laredo 5th Wheel with a dry weight of 7740 lbs, hitch weight of 1440 lbs and the superslider hitch weighs 243 lbs. My math tells me I'm 18lbs over the Tundra GVWR by 18lbs, before me or anyone else gets in the truck! After reading these post and post on rv.net, I'm not sure what to do. Have I screwed up big time here? Anxious to hear some thoughts on this.
Thanks!
Atlgagent
 

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I'm towing 8500 lbs. wet without any problems. You need 10 ply tires and air bags. Yes you are up there but with good judgment and being careful you won't have any problems. The Tundra is one good truck.
 

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We recently purchased a 2011 Tundra 2WD Crew Cab with a 5.7 V8 and Short Bed. The GVWR is 7000 lb. And the curb weight is 5335 lbs, leaving a payload capacity of 1665 lbs. The tundra is rated to tow 10,000 lbs. We also purchased a 2008 Laredo 5th Wheel with a dry weight of 7740 lbs, hitch weight of 1440 lbs and the superslider hitch weighs 243 lbs. My math tells me I'm 18lbs over the Tundra GVWR by 18lbs, before me or anyone else gets in the truck! After reading these post and post on rv.net, I'm not sure what to do. Have I screwed up big time here? Anxious to hear some thoughts on this.
Thanks!
Atlgagent
First off, did you actually use a scale to determine the dry weight of your TT? Factory stickers and brochures are notoriously inaccurate (and typically never include the weight of options like a/c units, batteries, etc.). If your figure is based on stickers/brochures, in reality it probably weighs quite a bit more. Why? Because "lighter" TT's sell better.

Same goes for the hitch/tongue weight. Did you get this figure from factory stickers and brochures? How a TT is loaded determines hitch/tongue weight--typically it goes up significantly when loaded. Hitch/tongue weight is NOT static. Again, to be safe you should determine your realworld tongue weight with a scale.

You could write a book about what to do, and not do, in your situation. FWIW, Cwit and myself see things very, very differently. IMO, what you're trying to do is unsafe. Not everyone here will agree, but I believe most will.
 

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I'd guess your trailer is over 10,000 loaded up and your pin weight will be over 2000.


Hard to tell without weighing it.



Not a big deal, trade your truck in on a 3/4 ton? That same trailer but in a bumper pull would be ok as well.
 
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