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Hi, I just bought my first truck (2021 Tundra 4x4) after having an AWD/4WD 4Runner and two Jeeps prior. Today, I was driving the Tundra up an icy, snowy steep forest service road (I was in 4H and at a low speed) and as I got to the top of the hill the Tundra suddenly started rolling backwards all the way down the hill uncontrollably. I could not steer it or stop it - the brakes would not engage - and finally it rolled to a stop. I have driven a lot of icy hills before in my 4Runner and Jeeps and have never lost complete control of a vehicle that is in Drive, but rolling uncontrollably backward. I was able to get up the hill in 4L and with greater speed ... but 1) is this normal? 2) what should I have done to stop the truck once it started rolling backward?, 3) should I not have been in 4H to climb out on an unpaved icy/snowy steep hill? 4L did not seem right for the conditions at first and I thought 4H was supposed to be used for ice. Thanks in advance - I have to be out in these types of conditions a lot, so any advice is great.
 

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Are you driving on your oem tires? Sounds to me like you are and you have a traction problem. If yes, and this is the type of terrain you drive on a lot then get some dedicated snow tires. All the fancy traction control functions on any vehicle wont do shit if you dont have grip and thats what you need.
 
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No problem. They should make all the difference in the world.
 

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Good winter tires that are tall and narrow with open tread so snow can get out from under is good. also, weight is your friend. I've shoveled a lot of snow into trucks or found weight. Empty pickups have little weight to help with traction. Less than your SUVs. Turning off traction control can help sometimes as most systems brake a wheel. There is a good youtube video on it 2-3 tries on hill and then off, he makes it.
 

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Hi, I just bought my first truck (2021 Tundra 4x4) after having an AWD/4WD 4Runner and two Jeeps prior. Today, I was driving the Tundra up an icy, snowy steep forest service road (I was in 4H and at a low speed) and as I got to the top of the hill the Tundra suddenly started rolling backwards all the way down the hill uncontrollably. I could not steer it or stop it - the brakes would not engage - and finally it rolled to a stop. I have driven a lot of icy hills before in my 4Runner and Jeeps and have never lost complete control of a vehicle that is in Drive, but rolling uncontrollably backward. I was able to get up the hill in 4L and with greater speed ... but 1) is this normal? 2) what should I have done to stop the truck once it started rolling backward?, 3) should I not have been in 4H to climb out on an unpaved icy/snowy steep hill? 4L did not seem right for the conditions at first and I thought 4H was supposed to be used for ice. Thanks in advance - I have to be out in these types of conditions a lot, so any advice is great.
I agree with both Cheapskate and Skifiddle. You need traction (tires) and rear weight. I lived in Spokane WA. Lotsa snow and ice and hills. First thing I did was change tires to all terrain radials, I used Silent Armor Goodyear Huge difference. My first year in Spokane I delivered phone books. Had a ton extra, so I left them in the bed. Later I put an ARE bed cap. I was able to secure stuff in the bed creating more weight. The cap was a lot of weight by itself. Then there is the skill. You may need a bit of momentum to get to the top of a hill, without flying out of control through the intersection you find there. That takes knowing the road. Don't travel unknown roadways in the snow. You might find yourself in a ditch you didn't know was there.
Now, don't you love how the Tundra is so stable? When i slide over a frozen bridge I don't swap ends like other vehicles. I love it!
 

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After I posted, I reread the post. Rolling and sliding are two things. Rolling is wheels rolling because brakes or park is faulty. Sliding is brakes or drive working, but there is little traction to the ground and you slide downhill with brakes or drive working. I assumed that brakes not engaging meant not engaging the ground, more of sliding with brakes engaging.
 

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I like to think: if I'm rolling I can steer. If I'm sliding, I got no steering available. I've slid backward down a hill in Denver CO. I didn't take that route again until spring. I was lucky it was early, or, the locals knew better not to try that hill. At any rate, I wasn't thinking and found myself going up a hill with a stop sign at the top and didn't prepare with enough forward speed to clear the top. Ended up sliding all the way back down. No traffic, no collision. And swapped ends so I can easily change my route as a bonus.
 
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