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Well my dad has been putting in 10w30 in the engine for ever but i notice that it says to put 5w30, is it okay to get 10w30 in or should i change back i know its bad idea to change oil types but has anyone had any problems with 10w30, i want to start running royal purple in it but i dont know if i should switch bad to 5w30 or 10w30 would be perfect i live in southern california.

Thanks guys 1gen-tundra's are still the best even tho i would love a 07 5.7l, but i still got another 5-7 good years out of my truck so i am going to keep it!
 

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5w30 in the winter, or when its cold and 10w30 in the summer. I would think it would make sense for you to stick with 10w30 since you probably use your truck mainly in warm weather (california). hope I helped clear it up for you, it would not do any harm to your engine if you do want to stick with toyota specs and switch back to 5w30
 

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5w-30 is fine. You wont have any problems swapping.
 

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I've used both. I know it sounds weird, could be coincidental, but my truck seems to like 5W-30 better. These trucks are not hard on oil. The 5W-30 does fine year round in even the hottest climates.
 

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5w30 in the winter, or when its cold and 10w30 in the summer. I would think it would make sense for you to stick with 10w30 since you probably use your truck mainly in warm weather (california). hope I helped clear it up for you, it would not do any harm to your engine if you do want to stick with toyota specs and switch back to 5w30
Good advice to follow, BadAss. I don't know about the weather in Corona, but here in S. Florida it doesn't get cold enough to warrant the 5W. I've used 10W since the first oil change, year 'round.

It's best practice to keep the difference between the weight of the oil (30 in our case) and the winter/cold weight as small as possible. For instance...

10W50 is 50-10=40
10W30 is 30-10=20
5W30 is 30-5=25

Viscosity index improvers (vii's) must be added in order to make a 30 weight oil flow like a five when it's cold. The vii's tend to breakdown more quickly than the base stock or other additives so in this case some is good enough, but more's not better. Only use what you need.
 

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thanks guys, always a help here, going with amsoil. but i still probally going to stick with 10w30 but i dont know yet i might go back to the 5w30
 

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Well my dad has been putting in 10w30 in the engine for ever but i notice that it says to put 5w30, is it okay to get 10w30 in or should i change back i know its bad idea to change oil types but has anyone had any problems with 10w30, i want to start running royal purple in it but i dont know if i should switch bad to 5w30 or 10w30 would be perfect i live in southern california.

Thanks guys 1gen-tundra's are still the best even tho i would love a 07 5.7l, but i still got another 5-7 good years out of my truck so i am going to keep it!
Did you see the results from your Amsoil vs. Royal Purple poll? Why would you put Royal Purple in when people voted for Amsoil as the best? Must be you got a reason.
 

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The best advice is to run the viscosity the manufacturer advises. if there is ever any engine issue between you and the dealer you will wish you had.

Under any circumstances an engine has a failure due to lubrication and you are running what is recommended, the problem is much more the manufacturers than it is yours. By running something other than they specify, you are assuming you know more than their engineers do, and that is the way they will see it.

The book asks that you run what it asks that you run, and it is the safest viscosity to use. That is if you want to play the CYA game.

5w30 runs just fine.
 

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The best advice is to run the viscosity the manufacturer advises. if there is ever any engine issue between you and the dealer you will wish you had.

Under any circumstances an engine has a failure due to lubrication and you are running what is recommended, the problem is much more the manufacturers than it is yours. By running something other than they specify, you are assuming you know more than their engineers do, and that is the way they will see it.

The book asks that you run what it asks that you run, and it is the safest viscosity to use. That is if you want to play the CYA game.

5w30 runs just fine.

If you want a leg up on synthetics, consider running Redline.
 

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5W 30 would provide a greater safety margin at high temperature than 10W 30. This is because on a graph of viscosity vs temperature (attached) the slope is "flatter" with 5W 30. The "30" means they are the same at 100 degrees C (212 F). Above 100 C the 5W 30 is thicker because the slope is less. There is an even greater effect from this with 0W 30, as well as better lubrication on starts in cold weather.

The attached graph and photo show these effects.

Oil Pour test.jpg

View attachment Oil Viscosity b&w.pdf
 

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Well my dad has been putting in 10w30 in the engine for ever but i notice that it says to put 5w30, is it okay to get 10w30 in or should i change back i know its bad idea to change oil types but has anyone had any problems with 10w30, i want to start running royal purple in it but i dont know if i should switch bad to 5w30 or 10w30 would be perfect i live in southern california.

Thanks guys 1gen-tundra's are still the best even tho i would love a 07 5.7l, but i still got another 5-7 good years out of my truck so i am going to keep it!
You're out of warranty do whatever you want, 10w-30 will work just fine in hot weather and is rated good down to 0 degrees and up, if your temps fall to minus 20 and lower 5w-30 would be better, I used 5w-30 for the length of the warranty I had engine ticking when the oil started to thin out, shortly after each oil change, around 2k with mobile 1 5w-30, when I switched to German Castrol synthetic 0w-30 (its almost a 40 weight) Ive yet to hear any ticks, the motor loves it. when I can no longer find the GC I mite go back to Mobile 1 0w-40.
 

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What's your oil change cycle with this oil? 10,000?
Minimum of 10K. I went 11,500 last time. Probly go a little more this time around. The oil was still looking fine when I changed it.
 

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Thats great 10K so basically once a year almost, i am sure your oil has been sent in for analysis and looked good, if ya let it go over just a bit!:tu: what about thier ATF how much a Qt is it?
 

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Mobile 1 10w30 synthetic, only oil I use in every vehicle I have, except the motorhome. I use 20w50 for that. But the motohome is carbureted.

Everyone has their preference on oils, but the truth is that the quality of oil has come along so far these days, it is really hard to find a "Bad" oil.

Just do yourself a favor, stay to your regular intervals, and do not beleive that 15,000mile or one year bullship! It is not a good idea, trust me. Did it to my Camry, ended up having all kinds of problems since then.


Good question!
 

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Viscosity index improvers (VIIs) must be added in order to make a 30 weight oil flow like a five when it's cold. The vii's tend to breakdown more quickly than the base stock or other additives so in this case some is good enough, but more's not better. Only use what you need.
Actually, for dino oils, this is backwards. In a 10W30 motor oil, the base stock (BS) is an SAE10. To get it flow with the appropriate viscosity at operating temperature, Viscosity Modifiers (polymeric molecules that are sensitive to temperature) are added. At low temperatures, the molecule chains contract (i.e. you can get more through smaller orifices) and does not impact the fluid viscosity. At high temperatures, the chain relaxes (the molecules expand out) and the chemically-designed increase in viscosity occurs and the oil operates like an SAE30.

Viscosity index improvers do have some drawbacks. The primary disadvantage is they are susceptible to mechanical shearing which wears away at its multi-grade capabilities, and, in a convential (dino) multi-grade motor oil, a shearing of the modifiers means a decline in the protections required by the operating temperatures.

Fully-synthetic motor oils are chemically designed with different polymers and additives to achieve low-temp performance characteristics, but the base chemical stock is, essentially, the operating temp SAE rating.
 
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