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Discussion Starter #1
Alright, first of all, I have a white 2000, and the paint gets dirty very easily. Whenever it rains I get black streaks from my mirrors and my bed cover, and sometimes they don't just wash of, I have to wax them off. Same with mud. If I get my truck muddy, even after washing it with automotive soap you can see mud in the paint, and it only comes off with wax.


Second (this one I'm sure has been beat to death, but I can't seem to find the right search terms)- how do you remove dried wax from trim? I'm kind of sloppy with it, and I can't get it off with anything.

Thanks in advance.
 

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Alright, first of all, I have a white 2000, and the paint gets dirty very easily. Whenever it rains I get black streaks from my mirrors and my bed cover, and sometimes they don't just wash of, I have to wax them off. Same with mud. If I get my truck muddy, even after washing it with automotive soap you can see mud in the paint, and it only comes off with wax.


Second (this one I'm sure has been beat to death, but I can't seem to find the right search terms)- how do you remove dried wax from trim? I'm kind of sloppy with it, and I can't get it off with anything.

Thanks in advance.
Try a polish instead of a wax, waxing only seals things in. Do a thorough wash, clay, then a light polish , then seal the paint with a quality synthetic wax or sealant.

You can easily remove old wax from black trim with peanut butter. Its an old detailers trick, just a little bit on a paper towel and it comes right off.
 

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i dont want to see you get to beat up on here some of the people are a little rough.

The detail guys are cool, its those guys in the "off topic" forums you need to watch out for. :)
 

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My two cents.

Considering the age of the truck and the part of the country it's in I would say the paint may be OLD. There IS a point when no amount of waxing or polishing can bring the paint back to nice and shiny. That would be re-paint time.

George60
NorCal
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The thing is, when I do wax it it does come back. The problem I am having is although I have waxed it, the dirt and such still seems to be really clinging to the paint, which I don't think should be the case. Since this truck, being a white 2000, doesn't have a clear coat, should I be using a no-clear-coat specific wax? Maybe more coats of wax?

Jumbo Jet- that's exactly what I was looking for, thanks.
 

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Wet sand the whole truck with 1500 sand paper take it to a body shop have them spay a new clear coat on it. beast bet.
 

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If I may interject here....

A general rule of thumb when it comes to automotive detailing is that you ALWAYS CHOOSE THE LEAST AGGRESSIVE APPROACH FIRST!! Wetsanding is the last resort short of repainting that you should do when it comes to paint correction.

From reading your post I have to correct you in the part where you said you could only remove the stains by waxing them out. If you are indeed using a wax, then as Jumbo mentioned you are only applying a layer of protection upon the stains on your paint as a wax is a protectant and not a cleaner.

The method I use to clean paint before I start to polish would be as follows: Degrease the truck with an all purpose cleaner (apc) such as zep citrus, P21S Total Auto Wash (an absolute must have in a detailing arsenal), or any other degreasers of the like. Next would be to wash with your soap/shampoo of choice, followed up with a claybar to get rid of a majority of surface contaminants that embed themselves into the clear coat. After that I would then apply a paint cleaner of your choice. Such paint cleaners would include: p21s paint cleansing lotion (my favorite), swissvax cleaner fluid, wolfgang paint cleanser, etc...the paint cleaners work to help remove surface stains that embed into the clear coat that normal washing can not remove. From this step you can go ahead and start paint correction with your compounds and polishes of your choice.

Now I am in no way trying to come off as being a know it all, but I feel it is imperative to all of us on here that we as fellow members share our experience and knowledge about proper car care with one another to help us all learn and grow into caring for our beauties.
 

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My two cents.

Considering the age of the truck and the part of the country it's in I would say the paint may be OLD. There IS a point when no amount of waxing or polishing can bring the paint back to nice and shiny. That would be re-paint time.
George60
NorCal
I do not think it matters how old it is. It does matter how it has been cared for. You can do wonders with making older cars/trucks look great. It really depends on
what you are starting with.

A general rule of thumb when it comes to automotive detailing is that you ALWAYS CHOOSE THE LEAST AGGRESSIVE APPROACH FIRST!! Wetsanding is the last resort short of repainting that you should do when it comes to paint correction.

Now I am in no way trying to come off as being a know it all, but I feel it is imperative to all of us on here that we as fellow members share our experience and knowledge about proper car care with one another to help us all learn and grow into caring for our beauties.
I agree....2X.

The thing is, when I do wax it it does come back. The problem I am having is although I have waxed it, the dirt and such still seems to be really clinging to the paint...
What are you using right now for products? That would be a good start to know.
 

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+1 to most of what has been said above (no wetsanding though). Toyota white paint is tough stuff, and is most similar to tractor paint. Easily faded, but rather tough. Kaleo hit the money though, follow those steps and you should be good to go.

As far as wax stains, peanut butter, WD-40, Degreaser etc.
 

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Simply put, I'd clay it, apply Mothers Back-to-Black on the trim, followed by Mothers Carnauba Cleaner Wax on the paint with a PowerBall 4Paint -- just do around the trim by hand.

The Back-to-Black does like time to penetrate, and it will help keep any wax from sticking, plus it'll help remove any wax that's on there already.
 
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