Toyota Tundra Forums banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I put on a set of Icon (IVD) coilovers on my Tundra shortly after I purchased it in Nov 08, and havn't been able to say enough good things about them.. really love them. The driver side shock, however, developed a slightly annoying squeak about 3 months into their use.. After a call or two to Icon, they told me to really spray it down w/ silicon, hoping that it was just some dust in the seal.. If that didn't fix it, they told me to send it in for a rebuild. I tried the silicon with no effect, and not wanting to pay the shop to remove the coilover, or be without my truck while the shock was sent across the country and back, I decided to live with the squeak. Well, recently, the sqeak turned into a groan, and then sounded like the front end was just gonna fall apart, so I bit the bullet and decided to remove teh shock myself and send it in. Having done minor repair work on vehicles, I was prepared for headaches, but still nervous about doing this type of work. I jacked the truck up and went to work.. removing some ridiculously tight bolts on the ball joint, lower a arm, and the shock itself.. Keep in mind, that i've heard of things like "ball joint" and "a-arm" but had no effing idea what these items actually were, where they were located, and how they worked! I got the shock off in about an hour or two, mostly trying to figure out what to unbolt to actually get the shock out of there.. I have to say that after I was finished, I knew so much more about how my front end works, and am embarassed to say how easy this job was - considering how nervous I was beforehand. Icon received the shock, and unfortunatly, found that there was NO oil at all in it, and it was compltely seized up.. How this happend, I have no idea. Other than living off a 2 mile dirt road, I really don't do any serious driving with the truck, and have only about 15k miles on thse shocks. Icon suggested that sometimes a shock can foul up because of LACK of putting it through its paces... While this sounded a little strange to me, I guess I'll take his word for it, until someone can tell me different. Basically, most of the shock needed to be fully replaced --- and since I was so smart and waited over a year to send it in, I was out of warranty. Fortunately, they gave me a mostly replaced shock for the cost of a rebuild ($75), and had it back out to me in about a week. Sure I would have liked a no charge replacement, but I suppose I have to be thankful that they were so generous with the $75 fee, considering I was 3 months out of warranty. Now it was time to put the shock back in, which also un-nerved me, as I have a track record of being able to take things apart much better than I can get them back together. Again, embarrassed to say how easy it was to get back into the truck.. took about an hour, which included 10 minutes of searching for a lug nut, which was stuck to the bottom of my magnatized tool tray.. Only tools required were some oversize sockets, a torque wrench, and floor jack.. Took it for a long test drive, and ahhhhh... quiet! So smooth, like new. Very happy that I did this work myself.. To all those considering wether they should considerg working on their suspension, let alone installing spacer blocks, I highly recommend just going for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,461 Posts
thats what i did. of course ive been around and in cars and know hwo they work i just never took frt ends apart before...but its a piece of cake. once u figure out which end of the control arm bolt wants to move that is hahaha and impact wrenches saved the day on mine.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top