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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi Guys

This summer my AC stopped blowing cold air. Went to the shop they put some freon given that it is an old car, but few weeks later AC stopped working. So they looked at it closely and there was a leak in the AC lines. The dealer says they need to cut the muffler to get to these lines, and the job is $2k.

It has 145K miles, runs good, but almost 16 years old and wondering if it is time to trade it. However, runs like a tank, has a wireless Carplay radio, new windshield. Awesome car.

And this is after $2 work on brake lines, $1k brake drum, $1k steering rack. But this work was done over the lasft 2.5 years, so putting some money on a reliable car, is not that bad given that a monthly payment on a new car could be $700.

What do you guys think?
 

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I'd check around to some local shops. There are lots of folks who are capable of working on these vehicles, no reason to stick with the dealer. $2000 sounds like a price that says "we don't really want to do it". There is a common leak from a deteriorated O-ring in the lines to the rear AC. I haven't had the issue but I've seen it mentioned here on the forum a number of times. Look up some of those posts. I don't recall anybody cutting out their muffler. I don't know for sure but I can't imagine the AC lines even run back that far.
 

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2005 Toyota Tundra 4x4 limited double cab 4.7l
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they are blowing smoke up your tail pipe. The lines are flexible and can be disconnected at both ends and furthermore most people route things away from the exhaust manifolds.
 

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What Lunas said.
$2k worth of brake lines- Mechanics have flaring and cutting tools specifically for this job. Dealers wont usually do this, they will only replace whole sections with oem parts, but most independents will go this route.
AC- Who the F cuts off a muffler to replace an AC line? I do believe there's a secondary HVAC in the back of a Sequoia for the dual zone AC so maybe there are lines that run from the rad to the back, but I also have a hard time believing any line would come close to the exhaust. I would think they run down the frame rail and should be no where near the exhaust.
No offense twix but you should be challenging your dealer about these repairs before you hand them your entire pay cheque.
Go to an independent, and ask them what they would charge for the AC job but get them to actually explain, in detail, what exactly they are going to do to fix it. Short of all your AC lines being totally rotted to hell I have a hard time believing they would quote anything close to that.
 

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2005 Toyota Sequoia Limited
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So they looked at it closely and there was a leak in the AC lines...
This statement says it all...after they took your money the first time, they decided to "look at it closely". stop giving this shop your money. Those prices are CRAZY
 

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2005 Toyota Sequoia Limited
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side note, where are you and if you decided to sell, please let me know. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I am located in the Northeast. Let me know if you are interested.

I used to use an independent, but few years back I thought he was getting bit expensive, so when it came down to the timing belt, water pump etc I went to a dealer, and then have been taking the car to them. It just gave me a piece of mind that parts and work was done by Toyota mechanics.

I took it to a local ac place, let's see what they say.
 

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What Lunas said.
$2k worth of brake lines- Mechanics have flaring and cutting tools specifically for this job. Dealers wont usually do this, they will only replace whole sections with oem parts, but most independents will go this route.
AC- Who the F cuts off a muffler to replace an AC line? I do believe there's a secondary HVAC in the back of a Sequoia for the dual zone AC so maybe there are lines that run from the rad to the back, but I also have a hard time believing any line would come close to the exhaust. I would think they run down the frame rail and should be no where near the exhaust.
No offense twix but you should be challenging your dealer about these repairs before you hand them your entire pay cheque.
Go to an independent, and ask them what they would charge for the AC job but get them to actually explain, in detail, what exactly they are going to do to fix it. Short of all your AC lines being totally rotted to hell I have a hard time believing they would quote anything close to that.
To the Toyota's dealer's defense, they quotes me $2500 for the brake line, I did take it to a Gm dealership that I know one of the guys and they did cut and flare the lines, including some of the steering lines. So they did all the lines for this price. Maybe would have been cheaper at a local shop.
 

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2005 Toyota Tundra 4x4 limited double cab 4.7l
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To the Toyota's dealer's defense, they quotes me $2500 for the brake line, I did take it to a Gm dealership that I know one of the guys and they did cut and flare the lines, including some of the steering lines. So they did all the lines for this price. Maybe would have been cheaper at a local shop.
The bottom line is we are talking about two reinforced rubber hoses with pressure fittings that go from the a/c pump to the evap I got mine replaced on my mercury cougar for 600 and that included recharging the system. Also the car doesnt use Freon it is 134a tetrafloroethane it is the same shit in air duster cans. Cars switched off r22 in the 90s
 

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Bet a regular auto a/c shop would give you a better price. Good news is it's winter and the shops are probably looking for business. More good news is that you can just roll down a window to cool off...LOL Chap
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Well, more mystery. The local AC shop says they cannot find the leak? I know there is a leak because I got the freon refilled and then it stopped working. Could it be that in the winter the o ring or something else got bit tighter and stopped the leak?
 

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2005 Toyota Tundra 4x4 limited double cab 4.7l
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Well, more mystery. The local AC shop says they cannot find the leak? I know there is a leak because I got the freon refilled and then it stopped working. Could it be that in the winter the o ring or something else got bit tighter and stopped the leak?
Humm o-rings and hoses get hard in cold weather. You might have found a scamming dealer who may have sabotaged your vehicle... and it might not be a leak there are other components that could go bad like the evap valve
 

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Did the A/C Shop put UV dye in the system to check for leaks? Did they do a vacuum test? Some of those over the counter refrigerant products also have oil, or a seal lube that might band-aid a leaky seal or "O" ring. I hear that this "leak repair" is hard on the system...but? Like you say the refrigerant went somewhere???
A vacuum test would show a leak. If it leaks out, I would assume that it has to suck air in.
I would chase every rabbit trail I could before I would dive into removing a dash. This is one of those do not proceed on a "maybe" or "could be" feeling.
Sorry for your situation... Chap
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The AC shop called after overnight they are able to see the dye. So there is leak. And they also are saying expensive repair!
 

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Something to consider. My wife's Durango had the lines to the rear A/C fail last summer, dealer quoted something like $1500 to replace. Parts were cheapish but the labor was over $1000 of that.

Ended up at a local shop that said it was a common thing and that replacing the rear lines was expensive but an easy option was to cap off the rear lines and just run the front A/C.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
How did your AC work with cappting the back and running the front? Was it unbearable in the summer?
 

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So rear AC condenser lines I don't understand why they would be run near exhaust nor do I understand why 4 fittings and longer hoses are expensive.
 

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I watched a youtube video of this because I couldnt really understand either. It was a GX470 but most likely very similar with secondary blower in the back of the vehicle.
Point is yes, from looking at that video this would indeed be a very labor intensive job depending on where the leak is. Most likely not much money in parts, just a lot of stuff to remove to get to the line and get it out. Now if its a dealer they dont patch anything, they just replace with brand new oem parts and rape you on the price. Local shops would maybe patch some things and charge a little less. Either way it sounds like both are sort of saying similar things in that they want to pull out quite a bit of old line and replace.
Not trying to offend you twix but from what you are writing you dont sound very mechanically inclined. You didnt seem to know the answers to questions, or think to maybe ask them, about what all is involved in removing and replacing leaking lines.
If thats the case and your just not into crawling under your truck for the next day or 2 yanking stuff off to DIY this one then maybe having a shop do the job is the right decision for you. My only suggestion is be a more effective consumer. Dont just walk out the door with a quote in your hand, get in the shop and ask them what they are doing, why is it so much, what parts have to be removed, why do they have to be removed etc. I have a feeling if you did that and they showed you what they were planning on doing you would probably say go ahead and do it.
 
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