Toyota Tundra Forums banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
ok so im working on putting a new ac compressor on my gf's 04 tundra double cab and i have two questions

1 i bought a denso replacement compressor and was wondering if i needed to add compressor oil to it or if it comes filled. i took the caps off where the lines plug in and there is some oil in it but i didnt know if i needed to add more.

2 i downloaded a service manual and on the double cab it does not show the aluminum tube the manual calls the receiver it sits right behind the front bumper is this something thats on just the standard cab and access cab or is it somewhere else?

thank you for any help you can give me
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
1st--The Denso compressor should come with and oil charge. There should be a threaded plug to check.
2nd-- You need the receiver drier, it filters the refrigerant and insures you have a full column on refrigerant going to the metering device.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks on the compressor but i dont know where the receiver drier is on the double cab its not where its on the regular cab and access cab any idea where i t would be?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
I read the FSM too, and it does not show a receiver for the double cab. As a matter of fact, for system charging instructions, it said to use a manifold guage set on the double cab, as opposed to giving you the option of using the sight glass(on the receiver). You could check your truck yourself. The receiver, if incorporated, will be in the liquid line (between the condensor and the firewall). As for oil, the FSM says to drain the oil from the new compressor minus the amount contained in your old compressor. For example, drain the oil from the old compressor and measure it. Let's say it's an ounce. Drain all the oil from your new compressor into a separate clean container, and put an ounce back in. The idea is to have the correct amount of oil in the system. Excess oil tends to coat the tubing walls of the evaporator and condensor, subsequently reducing heat transfer. efficiency.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
910 Posts
You might seriously consider replacing the condenser as well because when a compressor fails, it fills the system with particles that will ultimately clog the expansion valve and will shorten the life of the new compressor. Most new condensers are double-parallel designs (or something like that) and cannot be effectively flushed clean. You'll also have to flush the rest of the system and will need to add oil.

There are some good websites out there that address this issue.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top