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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been on this forum for some time now and have read many posts about replacing the timing belt. I know it is recomended to replace at 95,000 mi. and all, But has anyone on this site ever had a belt failure? If so, I have not seen the post. I'm not questioning any of the other posts and I know about "an once of prevention" and all, but I just want to know if anyone has had a timing belt failure and at what miles and year of truck did it happen..I havea 2001 with 100,000 on now and only put about 10,000 on a year. Just trying to figure out if my "now" black rusty frame will last long enough to make it pay.
 

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i have seen several t-belt failures...not a good thing on a toyota v8
 

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Being a Toyota Truck owner for nearly 40 years, I was wondering about the timing belt failure ratio myself.
Here at home the dealer is pretty big & a couple years ago I asked the service mgr. how many timing belts they had replaced & asked also how many failures that required engine replace or rebuild.
He had work there over 5 years & guessed they had done 100+ timing belt replacement, most with water pump.
He recalled only 3 with engine failure because of timing belt, & 1 of those was a because of idler or pulley failure, he said.
2/3 failures for this area & the volume of business their service dept. does puts up a big ? as to is it really needed @ 90,000 ?
A friend has a 04 DC 4x4 with 363,000 miles with original timing belt. He just had engine failure because of overheating, & bought a used engine to switch, lucky found one with 88,000 miles for $1200.
Another has a 07 DC 4x4 with 220,000 miles with original belt
I have 05 DC 4x4 with 165,000 miles, (But I do have timing belt/water pump on hand to replace)
Although the timing belt failure is costly, I am not sure that the requirement at 90,000 miles to replace is justified except for personal satisfaction that the preventative maintenance will insure owner's worrys about future failure.
David
 

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This guy has not posted anything other than his original post on this topic, but he claims his engine went on his '08 because of a failed timing belt.

http://www.tundrasolutions.com/forums/engine-and-drivetrain/290258-my-08-tundra-engine-blew-up/
His statement was:

Could anyone help me with this situation. My 08 Tundra's engine blew. The mechanic said the timing chain broke and the engine blew. Im having a hard time finding any engines. They are fetching like 5-7k for used ones. CRAZY!! Anyone know or heard of this issue with these engines, or if toyota makes good on this at all. Toyota had told me there is no recomeded service to the timing chain. What do you guys think??​

He did not have a timing belt, in fact he did not have the 4.7L engine.
 

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Ive seen 1 post with photos of a timing belt that was visually worn/cracked at 116k.. It did not break, he was replacing it, and posted the photos.. Ive also seen photos where the belt 'looks' brand new ('they say' visual inspection is not worth much).
Most of the timing belt jobs I've seen and read about, the water pump was beginning to seep or leak a bit, and that alone is worth the job, really. I am just over 100K and planning on doing it soon.

And in these motors, it's really pointless to pull the whole front of the motor apart, and not replace every potential failure part, IMO (water pump, tensioner/pulley/bearings, timing belt, any hoses, etc)

I did have a Camry (I4) once that the timing belt broke with about 120k, but did not cause any engine damage
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I think I'm going to take my chances and put off the timing belt replacement at 100,000. I may regret it, If so I will post on here as to what happened. The truck has 13years of Wisconsin road salt on her frame now. Wish me luck..
 

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I was broke and lazy and stupid (a combination of factors), so I didn't change my timing belt on my 2000 Tundra until about the 240,000 mile mark. Once I inspected the old timing belt, I could see easily that it was worn and tattered. It was a dumb move on my part.

(Note to everyone: using the line not the "T" for the timing mark, when installing the new timing belt.)
 

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I was wondering this myself. Had a 2002 Sequoia with 188,000 miles - never replaced the belt. Have a 2004 Sequoia with 205,000 on it. Replace the belt at 190,000. Father has a 2002 Tundra with 220,000 with original timing belt.

I just purchased a 2005 DC Tundra with 118,000 and wondering if there is a way to see if the PO changed before? The CarFax shows a fair amount of maintenance but nothing about timing belt.

Side note: CarFax shows lower ball joints replaced before 43,000 miles. Wonder what happened there!?
 

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@dekuiper, there was a LBJ recall/tsb on replacing early. My 06' DC Tundra had it done by the first owner at 32k
 

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I just purchased a 2005 DC Tundra with 118,000 and wondering if there is a way to see if the PO changed before? The CarFax shows a fair amount of maintenance but nothing about timing belt.

Side note: CarFax shows lower ball joints replaced before 43,000 miles. Wonder what happened there!?
Not 100%, but if you sign up on Toyota.com as an owner, put in your VIN, you should be able to pull up all the maintenance and repair records for that VIN that were ever done at a Toyota dealrship...

And like bikerjosh posted, I bet you find the LBJs were probably replaced under recall at a dealership.

You should also be able to see what dealership(s) ever did work on it...I've heard the website is not always inclusive on the records, so at least if you know which dealership(s) ever did work on it, you should be able to go in and get full service records from their system, I would think.
 

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You'd do well to change your timing belt. I changed mine at the 230,000 mark, or somewhere around there. When I took everything apart, the belt was tattered.

With our 4.7L engines, a catastrophe (!) will result if the timing belt brakes (or probably even if the pulleys or tensioners fail).

So do yourself a favor, and spend the money on the timing belt. You can swap it (and the pulleys and tensioners) yourself. There is plenty of how-to help here, and an excellent YouTube video on the belt change exists too.
 

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What type of use is most damaging to the belt? Is it hard towing or tough weather or other? Mine gets babied and rarely sees freezing or over 100 degrees. Mostly easy city or 65 mph freeway. Hoped this would be the least wear on it?
 

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What type of use is most damaging to the belt? Is it hard towing or tough weather or other? Mine gets babied and rarely sees freezing or over 100 degrees. Mostly easy city or 65 mph freeway. Hoped this would be the least wear on it?
The problem is no 2 belts will ever be exactly the same. So you can never rely on where you live or driving habits to determine the life of the belt. If your truck is beat to hell and the price of the belt is worth more than the truck then maybe its ok to just drive on till it explodes, if it ever does. But if you have a decent vehicle and want it to last for years would you be willing to risk destroying the motor just because you wanted to save a few bucks?
I get what green man is saying, his truck may not be worth that cost. Is yours?
 

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What type of use is most damaging to the belt? Is it hard towing or tough weather or other? Mine gets babied and rarely sees freezing or over 100 degrees. Mostly easy city or 65 mph freeway. Hoped this would be the least wear on it?
Very difficult questions. In theory the answer is belt wear is caused by the number of engine starts. Every engine start imposes the largest force on the belt as the belt has to overcome the rotational inertia of the valve train(s). Each engine start also thermal cycles the belt cold-hot-cold.

So the type of use most damaging to the belt - in theory - is lots of short trips. If you start your truck twice a day and commute 50 miles to work your timing belt can theoretically survive to a high mileage.

But it's not just the belt that can take out your engine. Every other component in the timing belt path is a potential failure point - the water pump, the tensioner and two rollers.

What year is your truck, what mileage and has the timing belt ever been changed?
 

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dont forget that replacement is not only mileage (really just a way of indicating engine hours) AND time interval.

if you rarely drive your truck or drive very little miles, you will run into the time interval prior to the mileage interval. rubber will degrade over time.

my question is this, why do people always question service intervals? do the recommended service and drive your truck. part of owning a vehicle is maintaining it.
 
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