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Discussion Starter #1
I need suggestions on make, type and size air compressor for home use. I do not have easy access to 220 volts so I purchased a Craftsman 4 gallon on clearance. I soon found out this thing was not made for mechanics air tools.

Is the Harbor Freight stuff junk?
 

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For air tools, anything less than 220V, 5hp, two-stage, 80 gallon tank, is probably a non-starter.

Determine the air consumption ([email protected]) of the tools you want to use, then look for a compressor with an acceptable duty rating (it can't run continuously) to deliver that cfm. You're probably looking for about 15+ cfm at 120+ psi. You can't get there with 110V.

If your breaker panel is in the garage where the compressor will be located, have an electrician run a dedicated 220V circuit from breaker panel to the compressor location. You are probably looking for a circuit rated for an electric dryer, but verify the compressor cord end configuration and amperage requirements to be certain.

Quincy from cheapest supplier would be my choice.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the reply. I think for the amount of effort it would take for a proper setup I may just skip the idea.
That being said does anyone want a great deal on a never used new out of the box 4 gallon Craftsman air compressor?
 

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I've been using a 30 gallon Craftsman compressor for 35 years and it does everything I've ever asked it to do for auto repairs.
It does require 220 volts, but I simply ran a hot wire from each side of my breaker box, It's hard to explain, but each side is 110v. The addition wire was for ground. I used 12 gauge wire. Check out exactly how to do it though.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well it appears my new house (new to me house) was wired for a 220 deep freezer in the garage. The search continues...

Are there any brands or types I SHOULD NOT consider? What about oiled vs oil-less compressors?
 

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...What about oiled vs oil-less compressors?
It depends on how the compressor is used. Oil-less compressors are fine for keeping your tires and beach toys filled, or maybe a little DIY nailgun work. For auto shop work, they're not going to last long long.

Based on my experience, I would not consider an oil-less compressor. I started out trying to restore a classic car with one of those 110V oil-less Craftsman compressors. My first use was for beadblasting rusted parts. Extended run time (there's that duty cycle I mentioned) caused the plastic compression rings to wear out in a few hours. Replaced them, and then they wore out again. Replaced them again, sold it in a garage sale, and bought the compressor described in my first post.

That compressor was a 6.5 hp, 80 gallon, two-stage, steel-sleeved, pressure-lubed Coleman-BlackMax bought at Sam's club in maybe 1992. I still have it. I clean the air cleaner every few years, change the oil every 10 years or so, and replace the valves every 20 years or so. I was able to get parts for it at the last rebuild, but I don't know how long that will last or if that brand/derivative, is even still sold. If they're sold, it's now a Chinese compressor I'm sure.

Harbor Freight will be cheap, but hard to get parts for based my narrow experience with their other tools. They'll probably be OK servicewise, but once they break, then what? What's your philosophy on hard goods?. Buy and discard?...Or buy, hold, and repair?

Edit: That 220V circuit is probably not for a freezer, but it may be adequate. You can see from the breaker rating if it will handle an air compressor. The outlet terminal configuration will reveal the amp rating for intended use. The outlet configuration can be changed as long as it's below the maximum circuit rating. The breaker is matched to the wire size and is the maximum allowable for the circuit.
 

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He's_right_you_know.jpg


My handyman buddy needed a light duty portable compressor (pictured above) to run his nail guns. He specifically requested an oiled unit over a non-oiled unit for durability reasons.
I doubt you could even buy an air compressor that runs on 220V (heavy duty unit) that does not require oil ~ and that's a good thing, I think.
I have a 'hobby shop' compressor that's been handed down to me from my dad ~ it requires oil but it's 50 years old and still functioning just fine.
 

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Funny, but I bought my Craftsman 30 gal 220v compressor back around 1983.
It developed a pinhole leak in its tank after a couple years.
I even used to purge the condensation out of it so didn't know if it was corroded badly inside its tank.

I once worked for a company that made water resistant radios for the Coast Guard and had some sealing washers in my hardware drawers (I never throw anything away lol). I drilled the hole, tapped it, and put in a stainless screw and sealing washer and have never had another problem with it. My wife is always on my case to buy a 60 or 80 gallon job, but at my age, I don't need it and my son already has one.

By the way, he's restoring hisb76 Blazer and were using my old 76 as a template and for better parts. I have to sign over its title to him, just in case?

Sorry for running on.
 
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