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I'm pretty excited about this airbox mod and thought I would start a thread that some could follow if you are interested to track along with my experience. First I have to give credit to HiVolt who had the idea and did the hard work to research, test and sell the concept. He provided the initial install instructions which inspired my work here. His post and thread here is excellent, I'm thankful, check it out! http://www.tundrasolutions.com/forums/1gen-member-mods-build-threads-write/109612-stock-air-flow-numbers-and-mod/

In my first post I'll provide a some detail about my version of the install and continue posting with ideas and updates. I don't normally do write-ups like this and I'm willing to update with more/less detail as needed. Also I must admit I'm not a mechanic, I'm just a guy who enjoys learning about wrenching on his truck, a do-it-yourselfer at heart that enjoys these forums. Proceed at your own risk!

Materials:
3 1/2 hole saw http://www.lowes.com/pd_348150-28303-1772946_0__?productId=3361296&Ntt=3+in+hole+saw&pl=1&currentURL=%3FNtt%3D3%2Bin%2Bhole%2Bsaw&facetInfo=
2 - 45 degree 3in pipes. I purchased two of these Shop NIBCO 3-in Dia 45-Degree ABS Street Elbow Fitting at Lowes.com
Drill w/ bits for the pilot holes
10mm socket and phillips screwdriver to remove airbox
File

Install:
1 - Locate the spot for your 3 1/2 hole, finished spot is below. There is a sweet spot which won't interfere or overlap with the existing opening for the a/c line. I used the hole saw without the bit, to very carefully mark the mid point to be sure it's precise. There is a fold in the metal where it curves and bends backward, this is exactly where I aimed my pilot hole.
3.jpg
2 - Drill the pilot hole to help keep it all steady with the hole saw in the next step.
3 - Use the hole saw and drill your hole. Be prepare to be steady as she goes. Since the metal bends in this area you're only making contact with half of the hole saw. As your depth increase you make/release contact with the hole saw at various points. Just be prepare to keep the drill steady so it doesn't jerk you around and leave you with a sloppy opening.
DSC00740.jpg
4 - On the pipe there are raised notches, file them down. File down any jagged edges in the hole opening as well.
5 - Test fit the pipe. The male end sticks in through the opening to the pipe we'll mount in the airbox later. It is a very tight fit and you may have to tilt and twist the pipe to get it in. (This makes for a nice install because there is no slack for vibration, perfect fit)
6 - I would take the 2nd pipe and make a visual id on where the hole should go on the airbox.
7 - Remove the airbox. Quick summary: Unlatch the lid, loosen the air hose at the throttle body. Place the lid and the intake hose off to the side. Loosen the 3 10mm bolts securing the lower part of the airbox to the truck. Remove the lower portion.
8 - Mark your location for the hole and pilot hole for the hole saw on the lower airbox, right hand side. The right side of my hole is 3/4 of inch from the right hand edge of the airbox. From the top of the lower airbox you want to be just low enough so that when the pipe enters the air box it doesn't interfere with the air filter as it is placed in the box. (If the pipe is too high towards the top the filter won't lay down)
9 - Drill your pilot hole then your hole with the hole saw. File down the rough edges and vacuum up the plastic mess.
10 - This is were some finesse comes in. I would place your 2nd pipe in the airbox hole and angle up to join with pipe 1. It isn't important to get the placement perfect just get it in the hole. You may have to flex the box and twist the pipe to get it through. (oh yea file those notches off the second pipe as well)
11 - Remove or at least pull some slack from pipe 1 for clearance to reinstall the airbox.
12 - With your 2nd pipe roughly place in the lower airbox, reinstall the lower air box.
13 - Twist and turn the pipes and join the male/female ends together until they are joined snugly like in the photo below. I managed to line everything up to avoid rubbing against the windshield filler neck and the a/c condenser line.
5.jpg
14 - If you use the materials I recommended and the 3 1/2 in saw everything fits snugly together, no movement, no rattles no RTV sealant required.
15 - Reinstall the airbox lid and air hose to the throttle body.
16 - Some might suggest unplugging the battery cable for 20 minutes or so to force the ECU to reset to learn the new profile sooner. (I'd do this before you start.)
17 - Optional step, you can buy a pipe cap at Lowe's where you can cap your setup if you want. Perhaps you want to revert back? Maybe it's raining a wall of water and you're worried about sucking in too much water... I doubt either of those are potentials but it's worth mentioning you can cap it at the grille.

First Impressions
  • I came from a K&N FIPK setup. Quieter in the cab and less aggressive over 3000rpm than the FIPK.
  • More power throughout the rpm range vs the FIPK, in my opinion. Overall feels like more power.
  • I'm not trashing the FIPK, there is a lot I like about it, the sound and the aggressive power at high rpms is great. The power curve in the RPM range is different for now I think it's better.
  • I've filled up once and all I'm ready to say is I think this is going to increase gas mileage. I'll verify over the next few tanks.
  • I do feel like I'm benefiting from a ram air effect and cold air straight to the box.
  • The truck settles nice at the low end and I think there is more power available when the torque converter slips to maintain or slightly gain speed.
Why do this?
If you have a stock box I think this is a no brainer, add air flow to the engine for $10 in pipes plus $20 for a hole saw if you don't already have one. For me I've always been interested in the cold, ram air principle and follow highwaylizard's posts. I had to satisfy my curiosity.


Upcoming Variations

  • I bought the stock box off of craigslist, the included filter looks old, so I'm planning to install this:D
    index.jpg
  • I have my FIPK materials. I would like to mount my FIPK pipe to the stock airbox lid. To proceed I need some sort of mounting plate that I can use to block off the MAF sensor hole in the FIPK pipe since the airbox lid has a mount for the MAF.
  • I'm interested to modify the stock pipe from the airbox to the fender wall and give myself the option to cap that pipe. I wonder in the ram air situation if I'm losing air pressure out of that pipe cruising down the road.
  • I am also looking for some scoop sort of attachment I can add to the pipe to increase the surface area to force more air in the box. I think I have an idea...
  • 61s9bPi8NCL._SL1500_.jpg
Anyways, something to talk about, I'm having fun!
 

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Just thought I would throw this out there....

For many years, earlier Toyota 4x4 guys have been doing whats called a "Deckplate Mod" to their Toys...
Here's pics:
https://www.google.com/search?q=deckplate+mod&client=firefox-a&hs=1Jp&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&channel=sb&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=NdQiVKb9BMunyASnvYHQCQ&ved=0CB8QsAQ&biw=1524&bih=771

There's TONS of write-ups on it, just Google the "Web" instead of "Images"...

Not really a ram-air design, but I thought I would just mention it for those of you cutting up your stock boxes to try different things.
If you all havent already, maybe it would be a good idea to incorporate in your "designs", some kind of connection on the airbox that can be quickly disconnected, and capped off, to return your airboxes to "stock".
It would make for quick switching when trying to determine differences between stock performance, and your evolving custom set-ups. Also, I imagine it would make it easier to switch back to "stock" for those of you who have emissions tests for registration.

Maybe install the deckplate as shown, then cut the center of the "cap" to somehow make a connection to your custom piping, so that cap and piping could be removed quickly, then have a second, uncut cap on hand to close the port, returning everything to stock...???

Just a thought...

I always wanted to attempt the deckplate mod on some of my earlier Toys, especially my '99 Taco, but I never got around to it...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hey Stone-

Here is a photo of the cap setup. I used a short pipe in the cap to mate with the opening. You can remove the short pipe and cap it from inside the box. You can also remove all piping and use this cap setup at the box.

DSC00731.jpg
DSC00730.jpg
DSC00737.jpg

I've never seen the deckplate mod before. Interesting and I suppose you get some fresh air from the opening behind the headlight.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Also this thing didn't work out so well...
61s9bPi8NCL._SL1500_.jpg

Wasn't enough clearance behind the grill to close the hood. I kept reducing it in size until it reached the point of ridiculousness. No flare/scoop yet...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Anyone have any ideas about how to install a blank in the MAF opening so I can use my FIPK pipe?
 

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Also this thing didn't work out so well...
View attachment 218665

Wasn't enough clearance behind the grill to close the hood. I kept reducing it in size until it reached the point of ridiculousness. No flare/scoop yet...
I hate to point this out, but your link ^^ isn't working. You've got me hooked on the thread and I'd like to see what you were referring too.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Sorry about the link. They seem to fall off randomly. It's back up. This was a Spectre product.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Just installed the K&N E-3034 High Performance Replacement Air Filter. ($61 Amazon Prime http://www.amazon.com/E-3034-High-Performance-Replacement-Filter/dp/B002BVAOFW/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1411682999&sr=8-1&keywords=E-3034) This filter comes in the 57-9027 Performance Intake Kit for the 05-06 Tundras. 57-9027 - K&N 57 Series FIPK, Performance Intake Kit I've figured out the kit won't fit the 04's and previous because the MAF sensor is updated. The good thing is you can look at the installation instructions on the website to find out how to mod your stock box for the bigger filter.

Here are some photos from my install.

The box pulled with the pipe mod above:
DSC00734.jpg

This is the box after trimming the stock pipe. I drilled out the stock fastener and used a replacement bolt and nut to secure the factory inlet pipe. I also trimmed 3/8in from the Nibco pipe for plenty of clearance for the new filter.
DSC00738.jpg

Filter sitting in the box
DSC00739.jpg

Haven't driven it yet, but I'll be back for updates on the mod. OP will be updated with a couple additional photos since I had to back everything out to install this filter.
 

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i love the idea of this mod but as i have read in several different threads on this topic saying that this is pointless unless you can reprogram the ECU. i see that you have a chip already installed so it may account for more air input but for us non chippers it may be a false hope. Good write up tho and if any non chippers have seen improvements please share them as i am very interested in seeing results.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
i love the idea of this mod but as i have read in several different threads on this topic saying that this is pointless unless you can reprogram the ECU. i see that you have a chip already installed so it may account for more air input but for us non chippers it may be a false hope. Good write up tho and if any non chippers have seen improvements please share them as i am very interested in seeing results.
Your point is a good one, and I'm looking forward to seeing feedback from a strictly stock setup. I'll offer an idea for thought though. Look at the diameter of the factory inlet from the fender and compare it to the diameter of the intake tube. I haven't measured it but I think the fender pipe is a smaller diameter. Your point about the ECU still stands but I would guess you would see some benefit with less of a restriction in air flow, maybe not.

I do think the factory ECU learns. For example if you reset it, it will back out very conservatively, as you drive, it learns. Most people see decreased performance and MPG during the first 200 miles of an ECU reset. Why not learn with piping more air in?
 

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Checking in with results after a week and I'm still happy. We had some weather and strong winds the past few days, add these conditions to a hill climb I'm familiar with and it was a good comparison. These conditions in the past she would have downshifted, now the torque converter slipped, or 1/2 shifted I guess, once and then back into overdrive. Very happy. I'll let a few tanks of gas run through and check in with MPG results.
 

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From my experience tinkering with my truck, you don't really need to reset the computer. Just give it time to idle and drive easy for the first few miles after messing with your intake. Toyota ECU's aren't stupid. Last few times I swapped my intake around (K&N to stock, stock to K&N, K&N to "The Bastard", "The Bastard" to K&N) I didn't touch the battery and the truck figured itself out. Resetting the computer just messes with your stereo settings.

Nicely done corc, points sent.
 

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^^Thanks. I'm looking forward to hearing from someone else who tries out the mod.
 

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I have done something similar but then went all out with a ram air intake scoop. Still tinkering around with it but on the back burner as I sort through some other issues. Hoping to be back on it before snow hits.

Ran low 20's over last winter on the highway.
 

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^Your threads really got me interested in the benefits of ramming air into the engine, since turbo/supercharging are really not options for me. This is kind of a middle ground for me for now. A functional hood scoop would awesome, I also keep eyeing the space right behind lower grill. I'll be looking for your updates and I'm sure lots of people will.
 

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^Your threads really got me interested in the benefits of ramming air into the engine, since turbo/supercharging are really not options for me. This is kind of a middle ground for me for now. A functional hood scoop would awesome, I also keep eyeing the space right behind lower grill. I'll be looking for your updates and I'm sure lots of people will.
I actually did some pressure testing on my hood a few days back and found some encouraging locations. May fabricate a mock-up today or tomorrow just to see how it looks both from a style standpoint but especially from a functional visual perspective - how much of my view will it block? I would need to build a new air box but the ideal situation would be to have the scoop directly over the air box. Hood supports make this a challenge. We will see. Lots of other priorities to take care of first but it is on the list.
 

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I'm pretty excited about this airbox mod and thought I would start a thread that some could follow if you are interested to track along with my experience. First I have to give credit to HiVolt who had the idea and did the hard work to research, test and sell the concept. He provided the initial install instructions which inspired my work here. His post and thread here is excellent, I'm thankful, check it out! http://www.tundrasolutions.com/forums/1gen-member-mods-build-threads-write/109612-stock-air-flow-numbers-and-mod/
In my first post I'll provide a some detail about my version of the install and continue posting with ideas and updates. I don't normally do write-ups like this and I'm willing to update with more/less detail as needed. Also I must admit I'm not a mechanic, I'm just a guy who enjoys learning about wrenching on his truck, a do-it-yourselfer at heart that enjoys these forums. Proceed at your own risk!

Materials:
3 1/2 hole saw http://www.lowes.com/pd_348150-28303-1772946_0__?productId=3361296&Ntt=3+in+hole+saw&pl=1&currentURL=?Ntt=3+in+hole+saw&facetInfo=
2 - 45 degree 3in pipes. I purchased two of these Shop NIBCO 3-in Dia 45-Degree ABS Street Elbow Fitting at Lowes.com
Drill w/ bits for the pilot holes
10mm socket and phillips screwdriver to remove airbox
File

Install:
1 - Locate the spot for your 3 1/2 hole, finished spot is below. There is a sweet spot which won't interfere or overlap with the existing opening for the a/c line. I used the hole saw without the bit, to very carefully mark the mid point to be sure it's precise. There is a fold in the metal where it curves and bends backward, this is exactly where I aimed my pilot hole.
View attachment 62424
2 - Drill the pilot hole to help keep it all steady with the hole saw in the next step.
3 - Use the hole saw and drill your hole. Be prepare to be steady as she goes. Since the metal bends in this area you're only making contact with half of the hole saw. As your depth increase you make/release contact with the hole saw at various points. Just be prepare to keep the drill steady so it doesn't jerk you around and leave you with a sloppy opening.
View attachment 62444
4 - On the pipe there are raised notches, file them down. File down any jagged edges in the hole opening as well.
5 - Test fit the pipe. The male end sticks in through the opening to the pipe we'll mount in the airbox later. It is a very tight fit and you may have to tilt and twist the pipe to get it in. (This makes for a nice install because there is no slack for vibration, perfect fit)
6 - I would take the 2nd pipe and make a visual id on where the hole should go on the airbox.
7 - Remove the airbox. Quick summary: Unlatch the lid, loosen the air hose at the throttle body. Place the lid and the intake hose off to the side. Loosen the 3 10mm bolts securing the lower part of the airbox to the truck. Remove the lower portion.
8 - Mark your location for the hole and pilot hole for the hole saw on the lower airbox, right hand side. The right side of my hole is 3/4 of inch from the right hand edge of the airbox. From the top of the lower airbox you want to be just low enough so that when the pipe enters the air box it doesn't interfere with the air filter as it is placed in the box. (If the pipe is too high towards the top the filter won't lay down)
9 - Drill your pilot hole then your hole with the hole saw. File down the rough edges and vacuum up the plastic mess.
10 - This is were some finesse comes in. I would place your 2nd pipe in the airbox hole and angle up to join with pipe 1. It isn't important to get the placement perfect just get it in the hole. You may have to flex the box and twist the pipe to get it through. (oh yea file those notches off the second pipe as well)
11 - Remove or at least pull some slack from pipe 1 for clearance to reinstall the airbox.
12 - With your 2nd pipe roughly place in the lower airbox, reinstall the lower air box.
13 - Twist and turn the pipes and join the male/female ends together until they are joined snugly like in the photo below. I managed to line everything up to avoid rubbing against the windshield filler neck and the a/c condenser line.
View attachment 62425
14 - If you use the materials I recommended and the 3 1/2 in saw everything fits snugly together, no movement, no rattles no RTV sealant required.
15 - Reinstall the airbox lid and air hose to the throttle body.
16 - Some might suggest unplugging the battery cable for 20 minutes or so to force the ECU to reset to learn the new profile sooner. (I'd do this before you start.)
17 - Optional step, you can buy a pipe cap at Lowe's where you can cap your setup if you want. Perhaps you want to revert back? Maybe it's raining a wall of water and you're worried about sucking in too much water... I doubt either of those are potentials but it's worth mentioning you can cap it at the grille.

First Impressions
  • I came from a K&N FIPK setup. Quieter in the cab and less aggressive over 3000rpm than the FIPK.
  • More power throughout the rpm range vs the FIPK, in my opinion. Overall feels like more power.
  • I'm not trashing the FIPK, there is a lot I like about it, the sound and the aggressive power at high rpms is great. The power curve in the RPM range is different for now I think it's better.
  • I've filled up once and all I'm ready to say is I think this is going to increase gas mileage. I'll verify over the next few tanks.
  • I do feel like I'm benefiting from a ram air effect and cold air straight to the box.
  • The truck settles nice at the low end and I think there is more power available when the torque converter slips to maintain or slightly gain speed.
Why do this?
If you have a stock box I think this is a no brainer, add air flow to the engine for $10 in pipes plus $20 for a hole saw if you don't already have one. For me I've always been interested in the cold, ram air principle and follow highwaylizard's posts. I had to satisfy my curiosity.


Upcoming Variations

  • I bought the stock box off of craigslist, the included filter looks old, so I'm planning to install this:D
    View attachment 62426
  • I have my FIPK materials. I would like to mount my FIPK pipe to the stock airbox lid. To proceed I need some sort of mounting plate that I can use to block off the MAF sensor hole in the FIPK pipe since the airbox lid has a mount for the MAF.
  • I'm interested to modify the stock pipe from the airbox to the fender wall and give myself the option to cap that pipe. I wonder in the ram air situation if I'm losing air pressure out of that pipe cruising down the road.
  • I am also looking for some scoop sort of attachment I can add to the pipe to increase the surface area to force more air in the box. I think I have an idea...
  • View attachment 62409
Anyways, something to talk about, I'm having fun!
Thanks for the nice write up! I did this tonight and I can’t wait to see the result. My friend and I were pretty excited with how it turned out so obviously we took it out to listen to the intake noises. Everything fit snug and looks clean! Thanks so much!
 

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FYI I did this on a stock 2003 access cab. Removed the charcoal filter and bought the k&n oem replacement. I’m hoping to see added mpgs, assuming I can keep my foot out of it. It makes such a nice noise now, it may take me a tank or two to get accurate numbers 😂
 

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Really got me interested on this.. I owned a 99 4runner and it had the deckplate mod unfornately I did not have a cap or bother to get one and I was going offroading riding in the river and a bunch of other stupid stuff, anyways I should of had a snorkle for the shit I was doing but now I have a 2005 Tundra and was thunking abiut doing a mod like this and now there is a write up and i like the location of it a lot better than the 4runner deckplate mod.

and Yes the ECU will learn that more air is coming in and will adjust. it has a range that it can adjust before you have to get tuning, bigger injectors, forced induction, etc. But most of Toyota guys know we arent going to be lining up at the Drag Strip every weekend lol
 
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