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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I currently drive an 05 Tacoma AC TRD 4x4. I've often wanted more cab room and a bit more bed space (not to mention better springs). I love that the truck has been relatively reliable for the past 90K miles, but I'm considering getting out of it for a fullsize knowing full well that I will take a hit mpg wise.

Really, at this point, the only two trucks I'm considering are a Tundra and an 05-08 F-150. I've owned two Toyota's, my 96 was bulletproof, the 05 was still solid, but not near like my 96. I had tended to be a bit more biased in the past with regards to other vehicles, but hear me out, and I would like input from those with experience to help in the decision process when I start test driving.

My truck is paid for, so I'm not buying a new truck to enter massive payments. The lower I can keep the payments the better. I'm not super concerned with speed, but I don't want a slouch of a truck. I'm not going to be towing, but I want the payload capabilities of a 1/2 ton, since I felt limited with my Tacoma. I really just want a solid truck that can take a good load in the bed, fit four people comfortably even if just for short drives, and that will average at least 15mpg). I've found an 07 F-150XLT with 15K on it for $19K which meets my price criteria, low mileage is good since I put about 12k/year on it, I should get plenty of relatively solid years out of it.

However, I can't get over the fact that many people claim terrible mileage in the 5.4, and if you don't have the power, but you're getting terrible mileage, it doesn't seem worth it.

As for the Tundra, even a used one is going to result in relatively higher payments, I'm uneasy about build quality (frame rust is a major one for me), and hauling capability. The springs on the Tundra don't look all that impressive, but I've read some good first hand reports from people that it does handle a load very well.

Reading about the AIP issue ticks me off, and since I would be buying used (around 60K miles), I'm sure it would be a replacement part within 30K after ownership which I don't want to have to shell the money out for).

Looks do play a major role with me, and while I know it's subjective, I like the F-150 much more than the Tundra in the looks department, but I could live with either:)

I know mpg would be a little better in the Tundra with way more HP/Torque than the F-150, but again, this next truck HAS to last me for a long time, so with that said, the fact that I can get an "older" F-150 with much lower mileage might equate to longer ownership down the road with hopefully relatively less major maintenance issues.

I will test drive both shortly, so it might make this decision easier, but I certainly am trying to be as unbiased here as possible. I know BOTH manufacturer's have their problems, so the blanket statements of one being vastly superior over the other pretty much falls on deaf ears with me. I agree one may be better than the other, but they aren't without their flaws. My goal is to hopefully make the best choice taking those flaws into consideration and get a truck that meets my needs (longevity, decent fuel economy, work load handling, and looks) best.

So, what are your thoughts? If you were trying to keep payments to a minimum, weren't dead set on one specific brand, and wanted a solid truck (no plans to lift), would you consider a much lower mileage Tundra alternative such as the F-150?
 

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F-150.

I faced the same problem last fall when choosing between a used Tahoe/Yukon and Sequoia. I preferred a Sequoia but it was thousands more than the Yukon. All I could find in my price range was a base model Sequoia; for less $$ I was able to get a fully loaded '07 Yukon.

My experience with Ford has been mixed. I lost an automatic tranny in my '06 Mustang GT conv. at 85k miles. The manual tranny in my '07 Cobra failed (countershaft broke) around 70k. My '03 Cobra conv. had the clutch fork tube break around 30k miles (covered by TSB). Both convertibles developed leaks in the floor pan seams due to body flex. For this, I strongly leaned toward Toyota and chose my new '07 Tundra over an F150.

My father's '01 F150 now has over 200k miles with no major failures; only a few coil packs replaced. It's been a great truck and I enjoy driving it. I've had more work done on my Tundra than his F150. So far on my truck: front diff assembly replaced twice; overhead console replaced; oil filler cap replacement; and acceleration recall.
 

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I would not consider a Nissan titan if you're doing anything other than driving it around town. THe rear differential on that truck will blow any time you get any heat in there. It's too tiny to do the job.

My vote is for a Ford. Why pay more for something with 4 times the miles that you know is inevitably going to have a 3-4K repair for something that is worthless. Even if your transmission on the Ford lasts only 100k, (We've never had a transmission fail, and one of our expeditions had 170K+ when we sold it), you're still gonna get more "value" out of that repair than two measly pumps lol.

-rockstate
 

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I would not get a Tundra right now without a really good platinum warentee as part of the deal,,,, hate to say it but true,,, my 5.7 4x4 also gets an average of 13.5mpg driving like a granny here in the mountains,, flatlanders get better
 

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I’d consider a Nissan Titan.Reliability is superior to any American truck


ROTFLMFAO!!! Dude, you owe me a new keyboard after causing me to spit my OJ out all over the keys.

Besides the before mentioned weak kneed Dana 44 rear, the bottom radiator tank will crack......not "if", but when.

Then there's the horrible brakes before '08......hey, at least they matched Ford there!!

Got to laugh at all the Tundra "problems".....an "oil filler cap"??? Wow, what a POS!!!

Let us not forget the Ford's woes during the time period stated:

Troublesome cam phasers.

Leaky injectors that will cause bent rods due to hydrolocking.....at least Ford stepped up and offered a 100K warranty on injectors.

Small brakes that will warp much easier than the Tundras (yes, I've read of that problem on our trucks, but the specs alone tell me if you warp a 14" rotor that uses a giant 4 piston caliper, you'll probably fry the Ford's brakes.)

Spark plugs that weld themselves into the heads that dealers will NOT take responsibility for during a change. I guess that's better than plugs spitting themselves out which the 2V motor did.

The already mentioned suspect transmissions........This reason alone is what had me change from Ford to Toyota. And I may not have changed except Ford denied the claim on my 3rd tranny because I was 3 days out of warranty (but 30,000 miles short of the mileage)


Anyway, I suppose the 150 can be had cheaper and I am sure that there's many more to choose from......but No one can tell me it's a better truck than the Tundra.

The fact is they both have known issues, but you have to decide if the underpowered, under braked, weaker truck is worth saving a few bucks over.

I say make sure you get a Tundra with under 36,000 miles and buy a $900 (+-) 100,000 mile warranty and enjoy the best drivetrain on the market.


Just a disclaimer, I'm still a Ford guy at heart and I can't wait to try a 6.2L in a S-crew.....but until then, the Fords in the vintage the Op is considering aren't even in the same ball park.
 

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Buy the one you like and feel comfortable buying. I'd drive a 20-yr old brick before I'd overspend my family budget on a truck. I'm not a Ford guy, but I can't imagine you going wrong with a well maintained used F-150 when it comes to value. I drive a 08 GMC (bought new), but I wouldn't think twice about a nice, well maintained 2001 to 2006 GM truck w/ a 5.3 if it were more in my budget. Heck, I drove a 03 2500 Suburban recently w/ the 6.0/4L80 combo and 120k+ miles. Drove/handled/purred like new...

Not trying to talk you out of a newer truck (like the Tundra), but you specifically mentioned cost as a motivator (as it should be). If so, listen to your senses and do what your comfortable with. My 0.02... fwiw.
 

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ill rep you if I could....:tu:
ROTFLMFAO!!! Dude, you owe me a new keyboard after causing me to spit my OJ out all over the keys.

Besides the before mentioned weak kneed Dana 44 rear, the bottom radiator tank will crack......not "if", but when.

Then there's the horrible brakes before '08......hey, at least they matched Ford there!!

Got to laugh at all the Tundra "problems".....an "oil filler cap"??? Wow, what a POS!!!

Let us not forget the Ford's woes during the time period stated:

Troublesome cam phasers.

Leaky injectors that will cause bent rods due to hydrolocking.....at least Ford stepped up and offered a 100K warranty on injectors.

Small brakes that will warp much easier than the Tundras (yes, I've read of that problem on our trucks, but the specs alone tell me if you warp a 14" rotor that uses a giant 4 piston caliper, you'll probably fry the Ford's brakes.)

Spark plugs that weld themselves into the heads that dealers will NOT take responsibility for during a change. I guess that's better than plugs spitting themselves out which the 2V motor did.

The already mentioned suspect transmissions........This reason alone is what had me change from Ford to Toyota. And I may not have changed except Ford denied the claim on my 3rd tranny because I was 3 days out of warranty (but 30,000 miles short of the mileage)


Anyway, I suppose the 150 can be had cheaper and I am sure that there's many more to choose from......but No one can tell me it's a better truck than the Tundra.

The fact is they both have known issues, but you have to decide if the underpowered, under braked, weaker truck is worth saving a few bucks over.

I say make sure you get a Tundra with under 36,000 miles and buy a $900 (+-) 100,000 mile warranty and enjoy the best drivetrain on the market.


Just a disclaimer, I'm still a Ford guy at heart and I can't wait to try a 6.2L in a S-crew.....but until then, the Fords in the vintage the Op is considering aren't even in the same ball park.
 

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The M.F.I.C.
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My last Ford was an '04 F-150 SuperCab 4x4 with the 5.4... I was NOT impressed with that truck. I drove it for about 2 years, and put about 25000 miles on it, before I returned it (lease) and bought my '07 Tundra DoubleCab 4x4 with the 4.7L. It was truly a night-and-day comparison between the two trucks. (Believe me, I have a long history with Ford vehicles, and several close family members that work for them...I'm not biased for any vehicle, and owning a Toyota has been difficult, only because of people being upset at me for buying one). The Tundra was much more peppy, much more comfortable, felt SOOOOOO much tighter & better made, was quieter... just all around a better truck. I had my '07 Tundra for over 2 years, and traded it in on a new '10 Tundra in December. I've been very happy with these trucks, and I haven't had a single issue. I feel they will last a long time - and it's important to note, that the Gen-1 Tundras (pre-2007) had the "Frame-rust" issues... I don't think the Gen-2's have the same problem.

But, with that said, I'd definitely get one before it hits 3-yrs/36,000 miles, so you can buy a Platinum warranty. That'll cost you an extra $1k or so... but it will cover you if the AIP issue hits.

I've found several 07-08 Tundras on ebay (under 36k miles) for around $25k.

Toyota : Tundra : eBay Motors (item 330432717253 end time May-18-10 15:12:35 PDT)
Toyota : Tundra : eBay Motors (item 290434555305 end time May-21-10 14:27:34 PDT)

NOW - If price IS an issue, then go with the F-150. The are definitely MUCH cheaper, and it's still a decent-enough truck, just boring. The nice thing is that there is an extensive aftermarket for the F-150's, so you'll have much more freedom to customize it. I'd still buy an extended warranty for it though... I don't know if they have a similar "Platinum" warranty, but if you're spending $20k on a vehicle, spend the extra $1k on the warranty to save yourself potentially $$$-thousands more if something breaks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I think the biggest issue with me with the new Tundra is price and my cheapness. I really don't want high truck payments. Not that I can't afford it, I just have other priorities, and want to save for bigger things right now(like land). I don't doubt that the F150 is a bit more "boring" than the Tundra, but then again, I'm not racing my truck. Some of the better deals I'm finding on 07+ Tundras turn out to be 4.7s for the most part, which is also a bit disheartening.
 

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While the 4.7 is the middle motor, it'll still be plenty of stick.

It's tried and true and IMO is the more reliable combo in the Tundra lineup. That 4.7 has been around forever, just like Ford's 5.4 Triton (both the 2v and 3v variations).

If you can find a 4.7 Tundra, nothing wrong with that in the least.

-rockstate
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Forgive my ignorance (I haven't read through the thread yet), but the AIP isn't specific to the 5.7, correct?
 

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While I don't believe it's "Specific" to the 5.7, I can't recall any 4.7's off the top of my head but maybe one or two.

-rockstate
 

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I currently drive an 05 Tacoma AC TRD 4x4. I've often wanted more cab room and a bit more bed space (not to mention better springs). I love that the truck has been relatively reliable for the past 90K miles, but I'm considering getting out of it for a fullsize knowing full well that I will take a hit mpg wise.

Really, at this point, the only two trucks I'm considering are a Tundra and an 05-08 F-150. I've owned two Toyota's, my 96 was bulletproof, the 05 was still solid, but not near like my 96. I had tended to be a bit more biased in the past with regards to other vehicles, but hear me out, and I would like input from those with experience to help in the decision process when I start test driving.

My truck is paid for, so I'm not buying a new truck to enter massive payments. The lower I can keep the payments the better. I'm not super concerned with speed, but I don't want a slouch of a truck. I'm not going to be towing, but I want the payload capabilities of a 1/2 ton, since I felt limited with my Tacoma. I really just want a solid truck that can take a good load in the bed, fit four people comfortably even if just for short drives, and that will average at least 15mpg). I've found an 07 F-150XLT with 15K on it for $19K which meets my price criteria, low mileage is good since I put about 12k/year on it, I should get plenty of relatively solid years out of it.

However, I can't get over the fact that many people claim terrible mileage in the 5.4, and if you don't have the power, but you're getting terrible mileage, it doesn't seem worth it.

As for the Tundra, even a used one is going to result in relatively higher payments, I'm uneasy about build quality (frame rust is a major one for me), and hauling capability. The springs on the Tundra don't look all that impressive, but I've read some good first hand reports from people that it does handle a load very well.

Reading about the AIP issue ticks me off, and since I would be buying used (around 60K miles), I'm sure it would be a replacement part within 30K after ownership which I don't want to have to shell the money out for).

Looks do play a major role with me, and while I know it's subjective, I like the F-150 much more than the Tundra in the looks department, but I could live with either:)

I know mpg would be a little better in the Tundra with way more HP/Torque than the F-150, but again, this next truck HAS to last me for a long time, so with that said, the fact that I can get an "older" F-150 with much lower mileage might equate to longer ownership down the road with hopefully relatively less major maintenance issues.

I will test drive both shortly, so it might make this decision easier, but I certainly am trying to be as unbiased here as possible. I know BOTH manufacturer's have their problems, so the blanket statements of one being vastly superior over the other pretty much falls on deaf ears with me. I agree one may be better than the other, but they aren't without their flaws. My goal is to hopefully make the best choice taking those flaws into consideration and get a truck that meets my needs (longevity, decent fuel economy, work load handling, and looks) best.

So, what are your thoughts? If you were trying to keep payments to a minimum, weren't dead set on one specific brand, and wanted a solid truck (no plans to lift), would you consider a much lower mileage Tundra alternative such as the F-150?
I think the biggest issue with me with the new Tundra is price and my cheapness. I really don't want high truck payments. Not that I can't afford it, I just have other priorities, and want to save for bigger things right now(like land). I don't doubt that the F150 is a bit more "boring" than the Tundra, but then again, I'm not racing my truck. Some of the better deals I'm finding on 07+ Tundras turn out to be 4.7s for the most part, which is also a bit disheartening.
Sometimes penny wise can be pound foolish. Price is important but if you're trying to be frugal you need to get into a vehicle you'll be happy with for the long-haul. Tons of people on here 'settled' for the smaller motor, the smaller cab, 2wd, a few less options. People all the time go for a mid sized or compact truck, or a cheaper make, cause they don't want a big payment. Great if that's what you genuinely want and can live with. Not a bad idea if you won't be holding your vehicle more than a few years anyway. Not so great if you want to hold it for a decade or more but you start to hate it after a year or two.

You have said yourself, this is for the long-haul. Something you'll be holding onto probably for 5-10 years or more. If this is the case, after the first year is done with and that honeymoon period is over, you will make that payment and feel a little pain once per month. You will think of how satisfied, or how dissatisfied, you are with the vehicle pretty much every second you are behind the wheel. Better truck at higher payment for 10 or more years, with several of those payment-free, is more fiscally sound than cheaper truck traded in within a couple years with a big hit for depriciation and 6-8 years of continuous car notes because you didn't hold it long enough to pay for it.

My big personal regret is not going full sized first time around. I went for cheapness. I saved 4-5 thousand dollars on initial purchase price. It amounts to I think 20-30 bucks per month and 3 more payments. My Crewmax doesn't do any worse for mileage than my Dakota Quad CAb did, but has twice the space and performance and is generally more enjoyable to drive. To me the 5K I saved last time around wasn't worth it.
 

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The M.F.I.C.
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I had the 4.7L in my '07 Tundra, and it was plenty of motor (like others have pointed out). It definitely "felt" stronger than the Ford's 5.4L. It'll still tow 8000+ lbs, and is "faster" than all the other trucks' small v8's. AND, as others also pointed out, it's a tried-and-true engine, that'll last you a long time.

eharri3 makes a good point: Buy the truck you really want (unless money really IS an issue).
 
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