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I love Google :D

A couple of sites showing maybe new improvements on the upcoming tundras...

I hope my 06 lasts for a while.... it sure wont get traded in but i dont want it to feel too bad about itself when a 14' is parked next to it... :devil:

2014 Tundra – What To Expect | Tundra Headquarters

From article:

Over the next few months and years, we’ll be adding content to this page about the next major Tundra re-design to debut, projected to be a 2014 model available in 2013. What follows below is projected enhancements, categorized as definite, likely, and possible.
Please bookmark this post as it will be updated regularly. ShareThis
Definite Enhancements

1. Larger fuel tank. Based on comments from Toyota engineer Mike Sweers (the man currently in charge of designing and developing the next generation Tundra) in this Wall Street Journal article, we know that the new truck will have a larger fuel tank.
2. More traditional styling. From the same article above, we learn that the truck will have a more traditional and aggressive truck like look. Hopefully, we’ll see a glimpse of this new look in the next year or two on a Toyota concept.
3. New dash. This is almost a foregone conclusion. While we may still see the over-sized knobs, we’ll definitely see better quality materials, new gauges, and a modified layout.
Likely Enhancements

1. Direct injection. Direct gasoline injection is a great way to improve fuel economy – it’s estimated that it can improve gas mileage from 5-10%, depending on the engine.
2. Variable valve lift. Variable valve timing (VVT) is commonplace, but variable valve lift is still a newer feature on most vehicles. Toyota, long a fan of VVT, currently has a couple of engines running a variable-valve lift system. This should make it’s way into all Toyota vehicles in by the middle of the decade.
3. Electric steering. Hydraulic steering pumps are less efficient than electric motors. GM and Ford both plan to move this into their full-size trucks soon, and Toyota will likely follow. In fact, this will be a common feature industry wide.
4. New frame design. Between the Tundra frame rust fiasco and complaints about harsh ride and bed bounce, the current Tundra’s frame is a weak spot in many consumer’s eyes. While it’s true that Toyota’s frame is similar in design to heavy-duty trucks offered by GM and Ford, the fact of the matter is that the current frame doesn’t have a good reputation. Look for Toyota to come up with something new.
5. Integrated trailer brake controller. If this feature isn’t already an option, it will be by 2014. Here’s to hoping it comes along sooner.
6. More configuration options. We’ve been told that Toyota recognizes the Tundra’s limited configurations hamper sales – especially fleet sales. If Toyota allowed customers to pick and choose options, they could probably gain some sales.
7. A new smaller and more efficient V6. Toyota is all but certain to bring a replacement to the 4.0L V6 to the Tundra (and Tacoma too).
Possible Enhancements

NOTE: These items are based on informed speculation…but speculation none the less.
1. An HD version of the Tundra. This seems to be the next big move for Toyota, but it will be interesting to see if they actually have the guts to do it. Creating an HD Tundra gives the brand another level of legitimacy, not to mention more sales. However, HD trucks must have a diesel option to be truly competitive. Considering the level of investment required to design, build, and test a new diesel – not to mention the strict emissions requirements – it’s hard to imagine Toyota will pursue this option. Still, some of the people we talk to seem to think it’s coming.
2. Engine stop-start. This system shuts off the engine at stop lights and then quickly restarts when it’s time to go. It’s a pretty good idea, it saves fuel, and the technology has been around for years. The problem? The EPA’s fuel economy test doesn’t account for wasted gas at idle…so adding this system does nothing to improve a vehicle’s official fuel economy rating (dumb). If the EPA fixes this rule (and they may), we’ll see more stop-start systems.


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From Toyota:
"
Toyota's official response:

Toyota denies any reports of the discontinuation of the Sequoia. For obvious competitive reasons, Toyota does not discuss future product plans. Sequoia continues to be a profitable, high-quality vehicle for Toyota and several years remain in the life of the current generation. Our focus remains on building our vehicles, including the Sequoia, with the highest possible quality."






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That said... It's definitely another 2014 thread but at least theres a lil more info about it.


Oh yeah, I do feel like punching my computer screen when I read the comments of people saying "oh this guy i saw said.... tundra is crap yadda yadda..." or "I hate the looks, it's just jap crap..... not patriotic..."



I almost hate those people lol... we own the trucks and few of us have problems if any, just like any other truck company.... but we have better, badder trucks then them anyways :devil:


Sorry for the rant, But I love my "Unreliable, crappy quality, POS Truck".... And I bet most of y'all do too :tu:








 

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maybe I should wait and get a 2014 instead of a 2010. But a 2016 would be about right so I may as well go for it now. 4 years is too long to wait anyway.
 

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so, Think we could get a 2014 with Direct injection VVL, Electric fan and TRD Blower without that Fuel shutoff for economy? Sounds like a 525hp-595ft/lbs option.
 

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The frame BS is a joke. My Superduty's frame looks almost exactly the same as the Tundra's...just bigger and thicker.

I will be anxious to see the changes. I still think the Tundra is the best 1/2 ton truck meant for work, but I can see where it lags behind in creature comforts.
 

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Honestly I doubt that many changes will occur, especially the direct injection, probably wishful thinking on that. Also doubt a major frame change will occur, will more than likely be minor changes to reduce bounce although in my opinion the frame is actually too stiff unloaded as with a load on it all this goes away, like it has to be preloaded to work right. Plus I've never had a truck that when loaded with my boat had this little of squat. Now the twisting of the frame could probably be easily cured with some extra supports, but other than that it seems fine. Slightly larger fuel tank would be nice though. Probably going to be more of an exterior/interior upgrade than anything else in my opinion.
 

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Elsewhere it was mentioned that the 4.6 will receive the biggest enhancement (direct injection) for CAFE and as a feeler to see if the market will tolerate smaller engines. I think they will keep the 5.7 around to see if the higher powered direct injected 4.6 gets enough bites, then they will drop the 5.7 later if it does.
 

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Toyota for years and years did a great job of distinguishing themselves as better than the other guy. They didn't get caught up in sales numbers, but instead producing quality vehicles and making profit on their own terms, which they rolled forward into making even better vehicles by working themselves into the heads and hearts of drivers in North America. Why Toyota tried to lower themselves by competing directly head on with "the other 3" beats me, but it obviously is related to money, and profit (and marketshare). When they produced the first Tundra, their goal wasn't to compete head on with the competition, but instead try and appeal to existing Toyota owners, some owners of the Tacoma, who wanted a larger more capable truck, as well as QUIETLY lure a few domestic owners who weren't happy with the same old shat. They even said this. They also acknowledged this fact when they came out with their current Tundra in interviews by saying their first Tundra didn't want to step on the toes of the at the time "big" 3. And that now the current Tundra is a head on assault. (I'm not saying that the current Tundra isn't one hell of a truck though - it really is, and it really deserves more credit than it deserves as it truely is the truck that is changing it all, still to this day).

Well I think they should get away from this head on assault and go back to their roots of distinguishing themselves quietly. Doing things THEIR way and appealing to the guy who genuinely wants quality by producing quality, durability, and reliability. Double, Triple, Quadruple check the engineering. Recommit themselves to the Toyota way (Lean Manufacturing) and make EVERY SINGLE F*CKING truck they produce on that San Antonio Assembly line F*CKING PERFECT.

I've mentioned this before in a previous similar thread, but I think one way Toyota could do this is by producing a heavy half ton - again 2300-2800 pounds payload capacities. Then at least they'd produce a truck that would still appeal to the average half ton buyer, but might also lure a few 3/4 ton buyers as well. They'd also be in theory, in a segment all to themselves where they can distinguish themselves and they have a sort of competitive edge that way where they can play the same head games the competition played with them (i.e. half truthes). Instead of producing an "either/or" half ton you can have a truck that can do "both," and by that you can legally haul more, tow more safely, and still be legal - something that can haul, move the crew or family, and tow.

Also, the current Tacoma could be made more capable as well with higher payload capacities. There is no reason why they couldn't produce a Tacoma with 1500-1800 pounds payload capacity where users could actually run a camper offroad as an example.

The way I see it is the half ton segment, while it is a popular segment, having a full size truck that can haul not much more than a Camry doesn't make sense (legally anyways).
 

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I've mentioned this before in a previous similar thread, but I think one way Toyota could do this is by producing a heavy half ton - again 2300-2800 pounds payload capacities. Then at least they'd produce a truck that would still appeal to the average half ton buyer, but might also lure a few 3/4 ton buyers as well. They'd also be in theory, in a segment all to themselves where they can distinguish themselves and they have a sort of competitive edge that way where they can play the same head games the competition played with them (i.e. half truthes). Instead of producing an "either/or" half ton you can have a truck that can do "both," and by that you can legally haul more, tow more safely, and still be legal - something that can haul, move the crew or family, and tow.

I agree completely, I don't think Toyota is going to invest in 3/4 ton models as the market just doesn't justify the cost. However, if they made a heavy half ton as you state I think they could easily upgrade the current truck to steal sales away from the big 3 in 1/2 and 3/4 ton varieties. With some minor improvements to the engine they could easily bump their towing numbers as well as their mpg. Personally I think 2014 is a bit optimistic given the state of the world economy but I hope to pleasantly surprised.
 

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Look at where the HD segment has gone- you have the big 3 chasing astronomical hp/tq numbers with their diesels, along with the astronomical price tags that come with those powertrains. You're not getting into that game for less than $40k. On the other hand, the big V-10's and 8L GM beasts are history. That leaves the gasoline powered HD trucks with 5.7-6.2L V8 powertrains brought over from 1/2 tons. And who arguably has the best powertrain in that segment for bringing home the bacon? (It ain't GM's 91 Octane swilling 6.2.) Tundra's already got the HD driveline, so I'd be willing to bet that for less than $500, Toyota could upgrade the frame, suspension, control arms, etc, even level out the front end, and walk away as the best gas powered 3/4 ton truck. And that's with today's 5.7. Add direct injection and other tweaks to boost the 5.7 numbers up to say, 400/420 and it really becomes no contest. Need we mention the factory S/C?

Toyota needs to get on the ball and make a 3/4 Ton version for 2012, not 2014. The dust will have settled over the 2010-2011 Ford and Dodge makeovers and the press could ooh and ahh over the HD Tundra for a while. It would also give Toyota a couple of years to run with the current 5.7 or even throw in direct injection, and work out any kinks. Then, they could hit the market in 2014 with a completely re-styled truck with a proven chassis and powertrain and even kick hp/tq numbers up to go along with the re-style.

I'm in agreement with ****e2k that Toyota would be better off getting back to their game of making a top-quality vehicle throughout and they shouldn't strive to be so cost-competitive with the big 3 at the expense of quality. I would also add that they should not get pulled into a tow/haul rating game with Ford and Chevy. They're better off making a truck that's competent at towing 10k rather than one that's iffy towing 11K.
 
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