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I'm a Plumber/Gas Fitter and while working for companies the past few years I've been driving basically Chevy Express company vans'. Never had an issue with the vans, they're great machines and work well, and aren't too bad in the reliability department either. Keep in mind though I'm NOT a service plumber, but more of a Hydronic Guru who happened upon hydronic heating doing plumbing installations for new construction and renovation plumbing. Now I'm also a hydronic heating (radiant floors, baseboard, boilers, etc.) designer to boot, and I intend at some point to go on my own hopefully soon, possibly next year.

Many say don't go with a truck, but those many are service plumbers. I'm curious if any of you guys use your Tundra for work. I currently own an '07 Tacoma Double cab 4x4 V6 Long bed (automatic) and a seperate van for the company I work for. I'm considering when I go on my own having a double duty vehicle (home/work) and that would be in a Tundra Double Cab, possibly long bed version (yes I know, one hell of a long truck, but would fit the duty very well). I've been looking at pictures of different commercial canopies, racks, etc. lately, but I really wanna see one in person. I'm not going to be carrying huge stock or anything, just mostly tools, instruments, the odd hot water tank, the odd batch of fittings & pipe that will be driven directly to a job site or a location and not inventoried (although I may carry a very very small inventory of some fittings).

I guess the question I want to know is if you work out of your Tundra, what type of business do you run, what type of set up do you have (especially if you're into contracting).

Also, looking at payload capacities, the weight of a commercial cap, etc. and what type of loads I could carry, while not a lot, I don't like squatting too much and may consider getting a small thin leaf spring added just to help level it out when loaded (not for lifting of any sort). Anyone in here have something similar? I was also looking at one of those bed slide things, which look pretty skookum for accessing supplies/tools easily, etc.

Anyways, any input my way is appreciated.
 

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My DC has about 1100# of load capacity left with the cap on it and the typical junk that I carry under the back seat. I use it for work, but not in the same way that you are talking about. Just hauling stuff to job sites.
To get stuff organized in a way that you could use you would need something like a side box cap which is a bit heavier, possibly 200# less available payload. Most of the cap makers have them available. If you get a bit creative about how you organize the inside it could work out well.
A.R.E. : Manufacturer of Truck Caps, Truck Canopies, Truck Toppers, Camper Shells, Hard Tonneau Covers, Work Caps, Fiberglass Tops, and Truck Accessories.
LEER, maker of Truck Caps, Camper Shells, Truck Toppers, Truck Bed Covers, Tonneau Covers and Pickup Truck Accessories
Snugtop - Custom Fiberglass Manufacturing, Truck Cap & Tonneau Top Covers, Camper Shells Tops, Customized Truck Toppers, Pick Up Truck Canopy
Oh, yeah! Get yourself a bed step also. If you are going to be in and out of that bed several times a day it makes a big difference.:tu:
One more comment while I'm thinking of it:
Pay attention to the way the back of the cap opens. Lower angles make the door easier to close and are better if you run with the door open but a high angle is necessary for clearance if you ever need to load stuff into the bed with a forklift.
 

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honestly, after helping a plumber friend of ours for a part time summer job back when i was like 15 years old....a van is really the best for that sort of job...and if i were doing it and needed a vehicle i'd strongly consider the dodge sprinter/mercedes whatever vans....decent fuel economy but a ton of stand up room in the back....a ton. the guy i worked with worked out of an 88 econoline van...and that thing had shelves on both sides to try to keep things organized.

now, if i were needing a double duty vehicle, one that could be like a reverse mullet (business in the back, party in the front) and needed to be civilized, then i could see using a tundra but i'd certainly want to get a Bedslide for it as getting in and out of the bed to retrieve stuff would suck. Mike Holmes on Holmes on Homes had one on his dodge and it worked well for him from what i could see....
 
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