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Discussion Starter #1
We were experiencing power loss on the freeway above 50mph in a 05 Tundra DC 4.7L. Vehicle is out of warranty at around 60k, so factory repair at no charge does not appear to be an option.

I obained and OBD II code reader and got codes P2445 and P0418.

Apparently P2445 means "Secondary Air Injection System Switching Valve Stuck Closed Bank 1"

P0418 means "Secondary Air Injection System Relay A Control Circuit".

I did some research in my haynes manual, and although it does give a brief overview of how the system works and shows how to remove each component of the system, it does not tell me the correct procedure for troubleshooting or testing the system.

Based on the symptoms I am experiencing (and if anyone experienced a similar problem), is there a quick and most likely fix?

I read that there may be a TSB on this particular issue but I was unable to find it.

If anyone has the has the proper troubleshooting or diagnostic proceedure for this system, it would be greatly appreciated! If that is not availiable, could someone at least tell me which manuals may have this proceedure and how much they cost? I'm assuming the factory one must.

I am also curious as to how the failure of the air injection system causes hesitation above 50mph. Does this mean the cats are not heated up enough and that is what causes the hesitation? Or does it mean the cats are permanently clogged and will stay clogged even if the air injection system is fixed?

Thanks in advance.
 

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There is in fact a TSB on this issue for you truck TSB# EG027-07 (see below)

looks like your out of warranty, ill try to find the repair for it.


ENGINE
EG027-07
Title:
M.I.L. "ON" DTC P0418 AND/OR P2445
Models:
'05 - '07 Sequoia & '05 - '06 Tundra (2UZ-FE)
May 15, 2007

Introduction

Some 2005 - 2007 model year Sequoia and 2005 - 2006 model year Tundra vehicles may exhibit a M.l.L. ON" with DTC P0418 and/or P2445. This may be caused by the air injection control driver. Please use the following repair procedure to address the customer's concern.

Applicable Vehicles
2005 - 2007 model year Sequoia vehicles produced BEFORE the Production Change Effective VINs shown below.
2005 - 2006 model year Tundra vehicles equipped with the 2UZ-FE engine.

Warranty Information
This repair is covered under the Toyota Federal Emission Warranty. This warranty is in effect for 36 months or 36,000 miles, whichever occurs first, from the vehicle's in-service date.

This repair is covered under the California Emission Warranty. This warranty is in effect for 36 months or 50,000 miles, whichever occurs first, from the vehicle's in-service date.

Warranty application is limited to correction of a problem based upon a customer's specific complaint.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks, I saw that older post in the Tundra forums before. It comes up when you google the DTC's. Unfortunately most of the information I found still did not have a completele diagnostic or troubleshooting procedure. I have information how to take the system apart from my Haynes manual, but nothing that tells me what I need to look for and how to trouble shoot to determine which part is bad.

If anyone has further info, please let me know. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks, this is exactly what I was looking for. I'll give it a whirl and post back my results.

Let me make sure I understand you correctly. If the Diagnostic Tester shows DTC's P0418 and P2445, I should go straight to replacing the Air Injection Driver right away, and not do al the tests (i.e., inspect pressure sensor, Inspect VSV, Inspect air switching valve)?

I already know I have DTC's P0418 and P2445. THe question is should I follow the manual and check the other components, or just go straight to replacing the Driver?

Btw, what kind of resource were those links? Factory manuals? Thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ok, I just fixed the problem. But the puzzling thing is I'm not really sure what I did to fix it!

Here's what happened. Someone drove down the truck with the problem. In reving the engine we could tell something was wrong. Tester revealed 2 pairs of DTC's. P0418 and P2445 were registered twice. A total of 4 DTC's.

As stated above engine was already warm when testing began. Unable to redline the truck with vehicle in Park. Revs mostly normally, except when approaching redline tach slows down and won't rev past redline and engine sounds weak even with pedal floored.

So I take out the Air Injection Driver from a known working Tundra of the same year and swap it out. Same problem. Even when floored, tach won't go past redline and sounds weak.

I then get the Diagnostic Tester and clear the codes. Once the codes are cleared, the problem dissapears.

Then I swap back the old Air Injection Driver (suposedly the non-working one), but the engine runs fine and check engine light does not re-appear.

Based on the above it seems that simply clearing the DTC's fixed the problem, now the engine will redline, even when the original Air Injection Driver was re-installed.

Can anyone tell me what might be going on here? In any case, I am still waiting to see if in time the check engine light comes back or not....

Thanks in advance!
 

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wow, thats crazy

however clearing codes most likely did not (fix) the problem, the reason the cel did not come back on is you have not met the driver cycle requirements, once the computer becomes ready the check engine light might come back on. unless replacing the part fix it.

it my have had something (pluging) something up but the operation of an air system just pumps air into the exhaust, close to the valves to help clean the unburnt gas and should not effect performance.

however if there was a vacuum leak i could see that causing your problem and when you replaced everything you fix the vacuum leak or if the air pump was on all the time it may change the o2 sensor reading and the vehicle would run rich maybe..

hope that fixed you problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
wow, thats crazy

however clearing codes most likely did not (fix) the problem, the reason the cel did not come back on is you have not met the driver cycle requirements, once the computer becomes ready the check engine light might come back on. unless replacing the part fix it.

it my have had something (pluging) something up but the operation of an air system just pumps air into the exhaust, close to the valves to help clean the unburnt gas and should not effect performance.

however if there was a vacuum leak i could see that causing your problem and when you replaced everything you fix the vacuum leak or if the air pump was on all the time it may change the o2 sensor reading and the vehicle would run rich maybe..

hope that fixed you problem.
Well, the person drove his truck today about 25 miles and said everything's good, lotsa power and no check engine light. I'm hoping it won't come back on.

The only thing I did was remove the Air Injejection Driver, Clear the Codes, and put it back.

The other unlikely thing I was thinking was maybe just removing the harness and putting it back remedied a bad electrical connection? Not sure.

The other thing that was weird is even though I never started the Tundra with which I borrowed the Air Injection Driver from, after I put the Driver back in (after testing the non-working truck), I drove it and I got a different code, P1600-something. When I looked it up it was an secondary air injection code. Now this is a code I'm getting on the working truck, even though all I did was leave the engine off the whole time on this truck, take the Driver out, put it in the non working truck, then put the Driver back in.

Later, after I cleared that code, it also never came back. Also before cleared the 1600 code, even with the engine light on, I did not notice any loss of power or anything else wrong with the vehicle that I could tell.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
wow, thats crazy

however clearing codes most likely did not (fix) the problem, the reason the cel did not come back on is you have not met the driver cycle requirements, once the computer becomes ready the check engine light might come back on. unless replacing the part fix it.

it my have had something (pluging) something up but the operation of an air system just pumps air into the exhaust, close to the valves to help clean the unburnt gas and should not effect performance.

however if there was a vacuum leak i could see that causing your problem and when you replaced everything you fix the vacuum leak or if the air pump was on all the time it may change the o2 sensor reading and the vehicle would run rich maybe..

hope that fixed you problem.
I thought about this again, and for some reason, it does appear that clearing the DTC's fixed the problem!

This is because even though I replaced the Driver with another one from a working truck, upon starting the engine, problem was still evident.

Since the intended fix failed, I was at a loss as to what to do. I got out the DTC, cleared the codes, and when I started it, the problem dissapeared. The only thing that was done between running the engine when it had a problem and running the engine when it had no problem was clearing of the codes. Replacing the DTC did not immediately fix the problem at all.

I also thought that the truck would go back to having the problem again when the original Driver was reinstalled, but it did not. So apparently it was not the electrical connection either, because if this had been the case, the truck should have worked when I started it up after the Driver was swapped out, but it did not.

I am wondering whether this particular fault code causes the engine to run conservatively or something until it is cleared? Not sure..
 

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I was thinking, when you cleared the codes, you set the ecm to a base setting, there for thats why it might be running better, I was explaining limp home mode in another post, and your right that maybe why it was and the other is now running funny.

if you have a check engine light, chances are your vehicle is not going to be running at 100% efficiency. You could have problems with your fuel system, ignition system, oxygen sensor, vacuum system, and other things. All of these issues can effect your MPG.

This is where a "limp home mode" comes into play. Whenever the vehicle computer gets a reading from a sensor that is obviously wrong, it will "assume" a value that it "knows will work". On the earliest computer controlled cars with feedback carburetors, if the computer got bad readings from sensors, it would run the carb at the richest setting. You would get horrible gas mileage, but the car WOULD run. The computer would then turn on the "CHECK ENGINE" light. It would also store a trouble code in its memory telling what sensor was giving a "bogus" reading.

The newer computers are much more sophisticated, and just because a "CHECK ENGINE" light comes on doesn't really mean the computer is totally in a "limp home mode". Depending on what sensor reading is out of specs the computer may still be doing a pretty good job of controlling the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I was thinking, when you cleared the codes, you set the ecm to a base setting, there for thats why it might be running better, I was explaining limp home mode in another post, and your right that maybe why it was and the other is now running funny.

if you have a check engine light, chances are your vehicle is not going to be running at 100% efficiency. You could have problems with your fuel system, ignition system, oxygen sensor, vacuum system, and other things. All of these issues can effect your MPG.

This is where a "limp home mode" comes into play. Whenever the vehicle computer gets a reading from a sensor that is obviously wrong, it will "assume" a value that it "knows will work". On the earliest computer controlled cars with feedback carburetors, if the computer got bad readings from sensors, it would run the carb at the richest setting. You would get horrible gas mileage, but the car WOULD run. The computer would then turn on the "CHECK ENGINE" light. It would also store a trouble code in its memory telling what sensor was giving a "bogus" reading.

The newer computers are much more sophisticated, and just because a "CHECK ENGINE" light comes on doesn't really mean the computer is totally in a "limp home mode". Depending on what sensor reading is out of specs the computer may still be doing a pretty good job of controlling the engine.
Thanks for the info! Yea, I think this makes the most sense. Sounds like some kind of intermittent problem that is not always there and caused the check engine light. Even after swapping the driver, it appears the problem was being caused by the check engine light or computer, since once codes were cleared normal operation resumed. Plus even after the original driver was put back, there were no further problems.

I know it wasn't any other problems (at least none that the computer stored a DTC for) since only the Air Injection system codes had been stored.

It would be interesting to verify if in fact a "limp home mode" is trigged when there is a DTC P0418 and/or P2445 and can be simply cleared by resetting the codes.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
THE PROBLEM CAME BACK THIS MORNING! I was told that the check engine light and problem returned. It ran fine for an entire day, since Thursday Evening until Saturday Morning before the light came on. I haven't checked the DTC's yet, but I am assuming it is the same P0418 and P2445 that were registered twice before.

Based on this, is it possible to rule out any components like the air injection driver? Can the truck or air system function at all if the driver is not working properly?

Also, since this is apaprently an intermittent problem, are their any sensors or parts that are more likely to cause an intermittent problem so I can better focus my search or diagnostic tests in finding the culprit?

I'm sure I can clear the codes and the truck will run fine temporarily, but now my goal is to figure out what is causing the problem in order to make sure it doesn't come back.


Thanks!
 

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THE PROBLEM CAME BACK THIS MORNING! I was told that the check engine light and problem returned. It ran fine for an entire day, since Thursday Evening until Saturday Morning before the light came on. I haven't checked the DTC's yet, but I am assuming it is the same P0418 and P2445 that were registered twice before.

Based on this, is it possible to rule out any components like the air injection driver? Can the truck or air system function at all if the driver is not working properly?

Also, since this is apaprently an intermittent problem, are their any sensors or parts that are more likely to cause an intermittent problem so I can better focus my search or diagnostic tests in finding the culprit?

I'm sure I can clear the codes and the truck will run fine temporarily, but now my goal is to figure out what is causing the problem in order to make sure it doesn't come back.


Thanks!
Hi i'm not a master mechanic but here are my .02 cents.
if the codes are still the same: it sounds like the bad truck is still using the original driver( is it ? ) if it's using the original driver swap it with a known good driver and use the truck for a couple of days or a week and if the cel light does not come back than your problem was the driver. it could be that it is actually taken the computer that long to register the code.
please keep us posted. thanks an good luck with the:fish2:
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Hi i'm not a master mechanic but here are my .02 cents.
if the codes are still the same: it sounds like the bad truck is still using the original driver( is it ? ) if it's using the original driver swap it with a known good driver and use the truck for a couple of days or a week and if the cel light does not come back than your problem was the driver. it could be that it is actually taken the computer that long to register the code.
please keep us posted. thanks an good luck with the:fish2:
well, that's the thing. no one ever conclusively determined the original controller was ever faulty to begin with.

also in reading the manual there appears to be diagnostics for valves and sensors, but not the controller.

I am going to try to do some of the recommended diagnostics in the manual (test for voltage, apply voltage, vacuum test) to rule out some of the other possibilities before buying a new controller.

I was just trying to determine if anyone knew if a controller fault should register right away. If so, then maybe I could rule it out since it didn't register for over a day.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Hi i'm not a master mechanic but here are my .02 cents.
if the codes are still the same: it sounds like the bad truck is still using the original driver( is it ? ) if it's using the original driver swap it with a known good driver and use the truck for a couple of days or a week and if the cel light does not come back than your problem was the driver. it could be that it is actually taken the computer that long to register the code.
please keep us posted. thanks an good luck with the:fish2:
FYI, I just called and this part lists for $300. Also, it is non-stocking, takes about a week to bring in. The parts guy is saying that he doesn't think this part goes bad very often since none of the warehouses stock it.

At this kind of price - I'm hoping I can find the problem elsewhere.

Would anyone know if there is another more common & less expensive part that tends to fail on the secondary air injection system? (so that I can focus my search better?) Thanks in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Did some of the test procedures from the manual today. When I applied voltage, no air came out of the pumps. Supposedly this is an indication that the parts should be replaced.

However, I instead decided to see if there was a fuse, I found it had indeed been blown. The fuse is an actual green block that has 3 fuses in it that needs to be replaced.

I'm not sure if replacing this block will cure the problem, but I have it on order and am crossing my fingers.

$19 vs. $300 is a substantial savings if this cures the problem.
 
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