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Hey guys, im having an awful time trying to get the shine back on my 05 Tacoma, its the white color and it has a chalky look to it, i have tried several types of wax even meguirs white wax specifically for white vehicles with no luck, still has a hazy look to it, I have owned mulitple vehicles over my life and have never had such problems on anything but the white ones i have owned my wifes white nissan is the same way. What am i missing Clay bar? polishing first? Any tips or things you guys have done to get the shine back on your white trucks ?
 

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Would you mind taking a picture when you say it's hazy? It could be a variety of things, from clearcoat failure to just lots of really bad scratches
 

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Hey guys, im having an awful time trying to get the shine back on my 05 Tacoma, its the white color and it has a chalky look to it, i have tried several types of wax even meguirs white wax specifically for white vehicles with no luck, still has a hazy look to it, I have owned mulitple vehicles over my life and have never had such problems on anything but the white ones i have owned my wifes white nissan is the same way. What am i missing Clay bar? polishing first? Any tips or things you guys have done to get the shine back on your white trucks ?

It's probably just oxidation. You'll need a dual action buffer, rubbing compound and a lot of time. Just be patient with it. It didn't all happen at once, so it's not going to come out at once. A professional could get it off quick with a high speed buffer but it will cost. High speed buffers can melt your paint it you don't know what you're doing. Do a google search on removing oxidation. Good luck.
 

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browntown, your truck i’m sure is superwhite but double check, if so it’s a single stage. clear coats get their shine from the clear. single stage
get the shine from polishing the paint. All wax does is protect and enhance. You’ll get a short term shine from the synthetics but
it will be masking the dullness underneath. You ain’t gonna get no where with waxes except for a short while.

Don’t bother with some of the crazy stuff you’ve read on here like paint failing, dealerships telling people the paint is thin, getting clear coated, it’s all wrong. It’s a single stage you gotta polish and wax it. It also will absorb more dirt. clear coat...hell my wifes odyssey is 5 years old i just single step that thing once every couple of years.

When you get done, the advantage is you’ll have pure color without the clear plasticy layer...downside is it is a bit more maintenance... but not really as long as it’s maintained..skip the maintenance and it will be a bit more work. That skipping is why they came up with clear coats...

Upside is the super white is tough paint you don’t have to baby it.

If it’s dull,cloudy it’s oxidized it needs compounding. Compounding polishing,it’s the same...compounding is just more aggressive...like sanding wood with progressively finer grades of sand paper (but not to that level of aggresiveness lol)

You will need a rotary on the superwhite...da isn’t going to cut it on super white and you’ll waste a ton of time and product (just from my experience). see my reply here:

http://www.tundrasolutions.com/forums/tundra/318481-recent-experiences-with-white-paint/

maybe a forced rotation da would, i dunno...that superwhite is hard paint, da don’t do squat. Between boat and car i only use the da for wax! or if polishing something plastic, or on the wifes clear coat i use it. I’m not a pro but i’ve done so many boats from oxized dust i think i have a pretty good feel for those and this particular truck paint.

Anyways will be tons easier if you pay someone as there is a learning curve and cost with different products people inevitably try..especially if you try the consumer stuff....then there’s all the work for *hopefully* good results.

What i do...coming from a couple of super whites that were cloudy and oxidized when i bought em.

you’ll need a rotary, selection of foam pads (even better 5 & 3” pads and backing plates, orange and yellow pads, yellow for compounding orange for polish) and maybe/probably wool.

1) wash then claybar the truck. This is required as you’ll be spinning a pad against the paint at 2100 rpms and want to minimize
additional hazing. It’s also going to get the embedded dirt and particles. I use dawn and water in a spray bottle..there’s all sort of optimium no rinse and other lubricants but this paint is tough, i wouldn’t bother.

Wipe the truck down with isoproply alcohol to get the clay bar stuff off.

2) compound: rotary with wool and megs 105
(optional rotary with yellow foam pad and megs 105)

It’s better if you start out with the yellow foam pad and see what you get but imho wool is the way to go on superwhite with cloudyness. Problem with wool is take a bit of practice you really gotta watch out not getting it caught around something. When i did mine, i started with foam and megs consumer ultimate compound...i ditched that quick for wool and and 105 as i didn’t want to be there all year! (and it looked safe due to seeing what kinda cut i’d get with the foam).

wipe down with IPA after compounding to get the compounding residue off.

Anyways at this point your paint should be obviously shiny and everything from here on out is to enhance that shine. If you still see cloudyness it’s not worked enough.

2) polish: rotary with orange and megs 205

the polish is sort of optional unless you use wool on step 1 wool cuts but leaves some swirling...but not really like it would
on a clear coat, but you polish with foam after the wool to remove those fine (you won’t even see them) things. The polishing adds i’d say 15%, it evens out the shine and polishes it to a further shine. Without really good lighting it’s just a hey work it until you get it good, you can’t tell jack without good professional lighting at this stage and if you’re in the sun it will dry the products out too quick to be able to work them.

At this point you’ll be like man am i seeing anything doing this polishing stage? you will when it’s in the sun. Without professional lighting it’s sort of winging it.

wipe down with IPA to get the polishing residue off.

3) megs ultimate wax

protection, enhance the shine further...quick and easy to apply seems to have good life.

At that point the single stage is restored. Polish with 205 once a year between your waxings (for wax grab a da for that...quick and don’t miss stuff like by hand or get streaks if using a synthetic wax). You shouldn’t need step 1 again unless you just don’t maintain it for years.

i just happened to be doing my yearly 205 polish this week (my trucks an 08), i’ll post some pics mid progress. This is with no wax yet, that’s tomorrow. Just megs 205. But again here, there’s no cloudyness because i corrected the oxidation couple years ago and *maintained* it, well not really i hadn’t washed in like 8 months and i’m a few months over schedule of waxing, this was supposed to be my wax schedule but since i missed it so long decided to go ahead with the quick polish.

the 205 stage goes quick...it’s if you let it go and have to compound that it becomes a time consuming pain in the arse.

If a daily drive you may have to add in to your yearly routine instead of waxes, a cleaner wax (has extra solvents) white get’s dirty as heck and so do daily drivers.

DSC_0002 4.JPG DSC_0005 2.JPG

Anyways hope that helps and it’s my .02 is all

There’s a learning curve with the rotary but not like everyone says ( i heard the same things before i started using them), you won’t burn the paint off unless you’re just inept and let it sit there for minutes with nothing on the pad never moving it or crank it up to 6000 rpms, or do the same on plastic, or put a 3” wool pad on at 5000 rpms and work a spot without moving much till it gets so hot it burns stuff....but if you forget those key things you will do some damage.

That said there is still a learning curve for sure handling it. foam pads are easier, don’t cut as much as wool but they like to skip around.

rotarys, are also heavy and a bit unwieldy ...and while pricy for a rotary the flex pe-14 is much easier to handle. ( i have a dewalt a dynabrade and a flex...id’ only use the dewalt/or dynabrade now cleaning up an oxidized boat for the compounding stage). Other thing...wool like to wrap around crap, get it caught on an antenna and it will be gone =)

That said if you went that route take your time, fender at a time see if you like the results, gives you a bit of practice. Then the next year you’ll know what to do to dial it in.
 
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