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Hey gang! The heater in my truck (2003 Tundra) takes a long time to get going and actually start pumping out any heat. Is this characteristic of trucks in general? Maybe a Tundra trademark? My wife's Camry heats up like a champ in virtually no time at all, but the truck takes a loooooong time. In the New Jersey winter, that's no fun.

Secondly, the air flow can be put on full blast but hardly anything comes out, regardless of the zone selected. I've had to make two or three trips to the dealer in the past and though they adjusted the zone selector knob, the problem happens again later. The fan is moving at high speed like it should (lots of fan noise), but it seems like the flow of air doesn't correlate to the effort. Does that make sense?

Any tips?

Thanks!
 

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My vents in the center (left and right of radio) are pretty strong, but the outside vents near the window are pretty weak, from a dead-cold start, it probably takes about 3-4 minutes to warm up completely (50degrees F outside) and make it so that I have to turn it down because I start sweating!

Overall I am not impressed at all with the air-flow quality in my Tundra, compared to my moms 02' F-150 Lariat SuperCrew, but its better than no air at all.

05' DC SR5
 

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3-4 minutes???? ha! try 15 to get my cab comfortable from a 20 degree F start. i'm halfway to work about 30 minutes away before the chill comes off the cabin. sure, some warm air starts to come out sooner, but it really doesn't start kickin until the engine hits hiway speed for a few miles.

i havn't looked under the hood, but i'm guessing there is a too small hose coming off the block to the heater core or the thermostat bypass hole is too small to get the circulation going until the engine heats up. the wife's corolla starts pumping good heat after just a few blocks around town. so does my nissan. on it there is a dedicated heater hose that comes out of the block and hits the heater core real quick.

i was surprised the toyota doesn't do as well. any techs out there with the answer to this and also to the rear pillar vent flow question currently on this forum? schematics or possible trouble areas would be mucho appreciated.
 

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Mine kicks out warm air pretty fast but I guess I'm starting from a higher ambient temperature. I wonder if the smaller engines get hot faster due to their size and the smaller oil quantity? I haven't done much experimentation on this, but maybe you can get more air flow by using the AC and setting the temp control to the highest (most red) position? I know I thanked my stars one time in Rochester NY when I fell through the ice while ice fishing (only to my hips) and my 66 Pontiac Catalina heater saved my butt. My wife caught me when I hanged my boot liners on the clothesline in the basement to dry.
 

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Might be just a bad thermostat in the engine. My Dc heats up fairly rapidly , its putting out some heat so its heating the cab within 5 min of driving. Your temp gauge, if its like the current ones, should be running mid way up the scale when getting heated up.

I had an explorer before this that it seemed I was changing the thermostat every couple of years to get some heat in the winter time.
 

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the gauge gets up to the middle fairly quickly. like within a couple of minutes of around town driving and faster if at highway speeds.

thanks for the idea, though. i really enjoy having all four gauges on the truck instead of the lights that don't tell you anything.

i imagine smaller engines do heat up faster than larger ones. the 4.7 has almost twice the oil capacity of a 4 cylinder engine and probably around twice the same coolant capacity plus there's all that metal to heat up. thing is, there is hot coolant available almost immediately from around the cylinder heads. a good design would take advantage of that and direct a portion to the heater core asap.

anybody know what makes a heavy duty heater heavy duty? it comes with the all weather package. maybe a larger heater core to heat up?

thanks for the input. i'll experiment tomorrow morning when i start her up.
 

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I noticed the same thing on my new (2006) 4.7L V8 Tundra as well. It takes an awful long time to warm up and I attribute it to the engine displacement as well as the higher engine coolant capacity. My Supra on the other hand (3.0L) seems to be kicking out warm out almost instantly. I remember hearing Lexus commercials in the mid 90's talk about how fast the heaters started making warm air (I think it was like 25 seconds or something crazy like that) and I assume they used the same system on my Supra. But yeah... these trucks take for EVER to warm up and with the highs in the teens the past few weeks that's been a real PITA. Looks like it's time to do remote start even though I said I wouldn't since it was a lease.
 

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In the california winter it's taking me 5 mins to get it warmed up but once its warmed up its gots hot at once. when the engine idles i just gas the daym thing to help it get going. noticed it was fairly long as well also.
 

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While only in Alabama, the nights here are getting down to 30F. I've noticed that my 2000 Tundra heater puts out heat only after the temperature gauge reads normal operating temp - about 10min of driving. My wife's 2004 4Runner, on the other hand, puts out heat like a champ!
 

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I thought my '06 DC did pretty good for heat. This morning I was going to time it on my way to work but forgot. What I do know though, is that with 11F ambient, I drove two miles to the kid's school, walked in to talk to one of the teachers, and when I walked out and started the truck, warm air was coming out.
 

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It takes the same amout of BTU's to raise the air temp. from 50 degrees to 60 degrees as it does to raise the air temp from 20 degrees to 30 degrees.So if you start off at 20 and warm up to 30,you're not as comfortable as the guy that started at a warmer temp to begin with.Then consider that the material that makes up the box you're sitting in is also at 20 degrees (and the material doesn't warm up as fast as the air),it is not inconcievable that it will take 4-5 times longer to warm from 20 to 60 than from 50 to 60.That would put it in the 16-20 minute area,which seems to be what everybody is confirming.Like it or not,I would have to say it's normal.
 

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I don't think it's normal. I have several vehicles and this one takes FAR longer to warm up and start blowing warm air regardless of ambient temperature.
 

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I ran out at lunch today. With a 27F ambient, in stop & go city traffic it took 2 minutes to get airflow that was not cold. Wasn't warm, but it wasn't cold. In 5 minutes I got usable warm air. In 10 minutes the engine was fully warmed up.

I have a temp probe somewhere...I may have to compare this vehicle to my minivan and plot the temp vs. time. Compared to my minivan I think this engine warms up quicker. My wife thinks it warms up quicker than her Sequoia but I can't see that being any different.
 

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My G35 takes all of about half a mile to get up to operating temperature and about half that to blow warm air.

Does the Tundra's IForce use a steel block? I'd imagine that steel could take longer to warm through that a smaller amount of aluminum. Also, does anyone know at what temperature the stock thermostats open?
 

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jeremyhelling said:
I don't think it's normal. I have several vehicles and this one takes FAR longer to warm up and start blowing warm air regardless of ambient temperature.


Unless all your vehicles are Tundras,you're not making an equal comparison.The smaller the mass or volume of coolant,the less BTU's it has to generate before you get heat.Then compare the volume of space in the cab that is dilluting the warm air.It's like dumping a cup of boiling water into a quart of cold tap water vs. the cup of boiling water into a gallon of cold tap water-which container will see the greatest temperature gain?If you are absolutely sure that your cooling system and t-stat are fine,the water valve is fully open,the heater core flows freely,and the blend door is passing all the air over the heater core,then it is what it is.
 

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theyotaguy said:
Unless all your vehicles are Tundras,you're not making an equal comparison.The smaller the mass or volume of coolant,the less BTU's it has to generate before you get heat.Then compare the volume of space in the cab that is dilluting the warm air.It's like dumping a cup of boiling water into a quart of cold tap water vs. the cup of boiling water into a gallon of cold tap water-which container will see the greatest temperature gain?If you are absolutely sure that your cooling system and t-stat are fine,the water valve is fully open,the heater core flows freely,and the blend door is passing all the air over the heater core,then it is what it is.
Even my 5.9L Dodge Dakota heated up faster and that's quite a bit more displacement so it blows your comparable displacement theory out of the water. I realize that not all my cars are a like and I expected this to take longer to warm up based on displacement but this is ridiculous. We're talking like 20min (5min warm-up and then five minutes in town and ten minutes @ 80mph on the highway) the other day when I got up at 7:00am and it was about 10 degrees out. Keep in mind, we're not talking toasty warm inside... just blowing warmer air out of the vents. I realize this is cold and the engine is larger but this is about half of what it should take to start blowing warm air.

I thought it was odd and I see someone else posted so I'm giving my experience as it appears I'm not the only one.
 

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Ha! The answer is simple, it happens all the time up here in Ottawa when it's -30. You shiver and shake like a dog sh*tting razor blades waiting for the truck to warm up....ever hear of "a watched pot nevers boils"? The same thing applies to truck heaters in the winter time ; ) Merry Xmas everyone!

Scott
 

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scottfraser said:
Ha! The answer is simple, it happens all the time up here in Ottawa when it's -30. You shiver and shake like a dog sh*tting razor blades waiting for the truck to warm up....ever hear of "a watched pot nevers boils"? The same thing applies to truck heaters in the winter time ; ) Merry Xmas everyone!

Scott
Sorry, not buying it. If you knew me you would know that cold really doesn't affect me the way it does most people so I'm not one to 'watch the pot until it boils' as you put it. I'm only comparing this vehicle to the ones the I also currently own as well as the long list of past vehicles that I've owned ranging in price, engine size and vintage and this is easily the longest it's taken a vehicle to blow warm air in any temperature. I suppose that it's due to the unusual cold streak we've had lately but also keep in mind that 1) I've lived here for ten years and know what winters are like and 2) I don't have a 'job' that I need to drive to on a daily basis so it's not that I'm sitting around in the cold waiting to go to work every morning. Just basing this one driving it once in a while along with my other vehicles and vehicles in the past.

I can see I'll need to do some actually testing to prove my theory but for now all I have is 'seat of my pants' data so to speak which isn't very conclusive or comparable. I also know that I have too many other things going on to worry about compiling numbers about this all I know is what I'm feeling and wanted to throw in my statement of agreement with the poster of this thread.
 

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jeremyhelling said:
Sorry, not buying it. If you knew me you would know that cold really doesn't affect me the way it does most people so I'm not one to 'watch the pot until it boils' as you put it. I'm only comparing this vehicle to the ones the I also currently own as well as the long list of past vehicles that I've owned ranging in price, engine size and vintage and this is easily the longest it's taken a vehicle to blow warm air in any temperature. I suppose that it's due to the unusual cold streak we've had lately but also keep in mind that 1) I've lived here for ten years and know what winters are like and 2) I don't have a 'job' that I need to drive to on a daily basis so it's not that I'm sitting around in the cold waiting to go to work every morning. Just basing this one driving it once in a while along with my other vehicles and vehicles in the past.

I can see I'll need to do some actually testing to prove my theory but for now all I have is 'seat of my pants' data so to speak which isn't very conclusive or comparable. I also know that I have too many other things going on to worry about compiling numbers about this all I know is what I'm feeling and wanted to throw in my statement of agreement with the poster of this thread.

All I know if I drove my DC '04 for 20 mins I would be at the point of turning the heat way down since it would be getting too warm in the cab, and thats even now with mornings around 0 deg F , mine heats up better than my 95 explorer did by far. Thats the only thing I have to compare too.

Maybe to characterize the theory of bigger takes longer to heat, I think my tundra engine also heats up fast than my , 1.6L I had in a car many years ago also, but that was awhile ago too.
 

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We have had nights in the teens here and if mine is left idling in the morning for 10 min it's just getting warm, not to the haft mark on the gauge yet. I do know it warms up fully much faster if you just get in and drive. Maybe 3 or 4 minutes.
To me this is very good for a V8 truck. My Blazer took much longer. My Nissan took for ever and on real cold days never really got hot.
As far a air flow through the vents, it is outstanding. If you have poor airflow you need to look into this. Over all I would say this truck has the best heater and A/C on any vehicle I've owned. The seats just stay cold along time, my only complaint.
Mike
 
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