Toyota Tundra Forums banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After searching several threads on the forum in regards to the ticking noise being heard on several Sequoia's, I am fairly confident that it is not a cracked manifold, not the injectors, and not piston slap. A couple people have mentioned that the rubber boot around the steering column can disintegrate or tear. While I was crawling around under the vehicle the other day, I decided to check out the boot. I could feel that there was definate damage to the weather seal(boot). Has anyone replaced this boot themselves? I did not find any steps to replace this. Is it best to let a mechanic perform this replacement?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I have a 2001 Tundra - same problem. I had the manifold replaced and the noise is still there. The rubber boot that goes around the steering shaft has a big hole in it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,427 Posts
bumping as i know there is thread here that has the part number and instructions
Here are the notes I made when I did mine.

45292-35090 Seal, Main Shaft

• Remove 3 bolts (10mm socket) attaching steering shaft cover in driver’s footwell.
• Drive Sequoia onto ramps and position steering wheel so that the bolt heads on the steering coupler are facing the rear of the vehicle.
• Secure steering wheel (prevent rotation) with a bungee cord.
• Remove upper and lower clamp bolts (flexible coupler and sliding yoke) with 12mm socket on long extension. Bolts must come all the way out or coupler can not be removed.
• Use brass drift to free flexible coupler from steering rack input shaft. Place match marks on coupler and on steering rack input shaft as this connection is not indexed in any way.
• Drive large screwdriver into sliding yoke at upper clamp bolt location to expand sliding yoke and release it from the steering shaft.
• Remove coupler assembly.
• Replace steering column boot. Lubricate with hitch ball grease (white lithium with Teflon).
• Reassemble in reverse order.
• Torque steering coupler assembly clamp bolts to 26 ft.lbs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Here are the notes I made when I did mine.

45292-35090 Seal, Main Shaft

• Remove 3 bolts (10mm socket) attaching steering shaft cover in driver’s footwell.
• Drive Sequoia onto ramps and position steering wheel so that the bolt heads on the steering coupler are facing the rear of the vehicle.
• Secure steering wheel (prevent rotation) with a bungee cord.
• Remove upper and lower clamp bolts (flexible coupler and sliding yoke) with 12mm socket on long extension. Bolts must come all the way out or coupler can not be removed.
• Use brass drift to free flexible coupler from steering rack input shaft. Place match marks on coupler and on steering rack input shaft as this connection is not indexed in any way.
• Drive large screwdriver into sliding yoke at upper clamp bolt location to expand sliding yoke and release it from the steering shaft.
• Remove coupler assembly.
• Replace steering column boot. Lubricate with hitch ball grease (white lithium with Teflon).
• Reassemble in reverse order.
• Torque steering coupler assembly clamp bolts to 26 ft.lbs.
I replaced the steering shaft seal on my '01 Sequoia this past weekend using these extremely helpful instructions. I am adding a few extra comments that may make these great instruction even better. I have only done this procedure once so I'm not sure if there are variations between years and models. It took about 3 hours to complete.

I jacked up the front end and placed it on jack stands so that I could easily turn the steering after the installation without running the engine to see that everything had been assembled correctly and that the alignment was ok.

Spray the outside couplings with lots of penetrating oil and let them soak.

DO NOT disassemble the universal joint couplings on either the inside or outside of the truck.

Complete the disassembly of the outside components first then move inside the cab.

The splines on the inside steering shaft only fit one way and the splines on the sliding coupler of the steering shaft in the engine compartment only fit one way too. However, the splines on the lower end that attach to the rack and pinion do not have the same reference so you should mark the position relative to each other. Remove this lower connection first, driving it apart with a punch from the bottom. Next, drive the coupler apart using a hammer and long punch from the topside of the engine compartment.

After pulling back the carpeting and removing the velcro affixed carpet backing, you will need to remove all of the bolts (I believe there were six) holding the housing inside the cab. Three hold a plastic cover in place and the remaining three hold the rest of the cover. There is also a cable that runs through this housing (that I believe runs to the transmission) that doesn't need to be removed. There is enough room to move the housing over and brace against the gas pedal to facilitate driving the seal out with a large hammer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
374 Posts
It took me like 30 minutes. take apart. hammer out. put back together. i spent two years and alot of cash trying to find this tick on my old tundra. was an extremely frustrating issue until i found it a few years back.

when i bought the 06 sequoia in 2010 it was the first thing i did.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
did this yesterday, I used the jackstand method. I paint marked the upper/lower to the coupler and left the ign on so I could rotate freely during dis-assembly, helped greatly. Also, removed the driver front wheel, made things easy!

observations- more prying on the coupler the better, then bearing grease makes it go back together easy.
-indexing both sides makes it stress free, then just turn it whichever way is convenient

Made a world of difference driving!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Holy crap this thread is a godsend. Just replaced manifolds on a 2001 sequoia with JBA shorty's using Percy's seal 4 good gaskets and new OEM Toyota studs and nuts , re-tightened repeatedly, and it still sounds like a ticking cracked manifold. Going to replace the steering shaft boot immediately.

Much thanks!!!
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top