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Ok, I have an 08 Tundra 4x4 5.7 DC with 43k on the clock. My factory front rotors where warped at 25k miles, so I decided to replace them so I went with the Napa ultra premium pads and rotors. Well they are warped again, I honestly don't drive the truck hard, mostly road mile have only pulled a bass boat about 5 times, and a camper once. But just to reiterate I really try to take it easy on the truck. My last truck was a 03 Chevy Z71 and I had the same problem with rotors, I have finally come to the conclusion that I think ceramic pads might produce less dust, but they don't bit nearly as hard causing you to have to press harder to produce enough braking power and I believe that this is what is causing the problem. I am sure this will spark a debate but to each his own I guess. But my main purpose behind this thread is to get some feedback on pad and rotor combos that other Tundra owners are using that actually have sustained amount of miles on them and they still perform well. I will add a caveat to the ceramic pad theory as well, I also think that over torqueing the wheels is a large contributing factor to early rotor warpage. I have already ordered Hawk LTS pads for the front and rear, but I am sincerely torn on what rotors to get, definatley not OEM, thinking about the Raybestos Advanced technology ones from Rock Auto, or the Power Slot rotors. Any feedback is greatly appreciated.
Semper Fi
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Also, I was considering the Centric premium rotors. I am aware that any rotor is going to wear out eventually, but I will soon be moving to Colorado, and I want to get a set of 4 rotors that will last. I have also purchased a craftsman torque wrench and 4 jack stands, I will be doing my own tire rotations from now on. I just had 4 new Michelin LTX MS2's put on, when I got home I checked the torque and I couldn't even break them loose with my torque wrench I had to get out the breaker bar. That is rediculous, there is even a TSB that plainly states 97 ft/lbs for the aluminum rims. Good help is hard to find these days.
 

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I've heard that people are having good luck with the EBC rotors and pads. But I don't have personal experience with them
 

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Wow! I have 53000 miles on my tundra and still on original pads and rotors. I wonder what the difference is? I do downshift often, maybe that makes a difference? As far as rotors go, people were going with the NAPA rotors, but I've heard the Centric rotors are very good as well. Good luck on your decision.
 

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I'd like to hear what people have to say as well. I am at 41k with about 8k of that towing and I am still on my stock rotors and pads but I am soon going to need to replace everything. I am definitely happy with how long they have lasted.
 

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I have finally come to the conclusion that I think ceramic pads might produce less dust, but they don't bit nearly as hard causing you to have to press harder to produce enough braking power and I believe that this is what is causing the problem. I am sure this will spark a debate but to each his own I guess.
I think it's more likely that a particular ceramic pad may have a lower friction coefficient than another pad, but it's not necessarily an excluder; you CAN have a ceramic pad that generates brake torque with a lower line pressure compared to a typical ferro-carbon pad. Typically the ceramic pads will have lighter colored brake dust that's less noticable, and the dust is less corrosive. Pads with a high iron content will tend to yield brake dust that adheres to wheels, particularly in wet conditions. (Hawk Blue racecar brake pads come to mind. The dust will actually rust and stick to most wheel finishes and bodywork)

*So I offer that the ceramic pads may not have as high of a cf as some other pads. Not a guarantee, but a possibility.

Have you considered that you may have some uneven pad deposits? Granted some pads have dust that to collect and melt onto the rotor during a heavy braking event which creates a "high spot". Since this is a thickness variation, it will create the same feeling as a warped brake rotor.

If you're to the point of giving up on the current brakes, you might want to consider doing a bedding-in cycle similar to what is typical for new racecar brakes. I've done this on a few street cars and cleared up the "warped rotor" feeling. You want a clear, unpopulated road where you can stop, not hit anyone else, not get rear-ended and not break any laws.

Do 6-7 stops from 30-5mph with light to moderate pedal pressure. Minimal cooldown time between.
Do another 6-7 stops from 45-5mph with moderate to heavy pedal pressure. Minimal cooldown time between.
Then drive for about 10-15 minutes without stopping, or using the brakes.

You might begin to smell the brakes, and the pedal may get somewhat soft by the last set of stops. The basic idea is to bring both the pads and rotor up to temperature gradually, then heat the pads to a point that the pad material at the pad:rotor interface liquefies and wipes a thin even layer of material onto the rotor surface. The cooldown period allows this transfer layer of material to adhere to the rotor. If you have uneven pad deposits, this may help soften those up and re-establish a flat, smooth layer of material on the rotor. Might be worth a shot!

PS- good ideas on torquing the wheels yourself. Centric makes good quality stuff, although the NAPA premiums are typically fairly good as well. Every once in a while you'll see some casting flaws in the parts store rotors that I haven't seen in the Centric stuff I've bought before.
 

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After my stock rotors warped I went with the centric rotors and hawk brake pads. I tow a camper mountains with some long downhill grades. No problems now with the brakes for 35K. I have a 07 DC 4x4
 
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