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Has anyone found a good solution to the brake problem that the early tundras were born with? I've thought about upgrading to larger break system with vented rotors or if someone has done such an upgrade that has proven successful I would be happy to hear from you. I had new rotors and pads installed about 2 1\2 or 3 years ago and I can tell they are reaching the point of needing attention again before too long. I've had this done at least 7 to 8 times since I bought the truck new in 2001. It should have been noted in the owner's manual right below regular scheduled oil changes! I joke about it but because well it's the darn brakes I have to take it seriously. Aside from that one thorn in the side this has been an excellent reliable truck. 220,000 miles and still going strong. Anyway I'll get off here and hope to hear some good news. Thanks for reading
 

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Has anyone found a good solution to the brake problem that the early tundras were born with? I've thought about upgrading to larger break system with vented rotors or if someone has done such an upgrade that has proven successful I would be happy to hear from you. I had new rotors and pads installed about 2 1\2 or 3 years ago and I can tell they are reaching the point of needing attention again before too long. I've had this done at least 7 to 8 times since I bought the truck new in 2001. It should have been noted in the owner's manual right below regular scheduled oil changes! I joke about it but because well it's the darn brakes I have to take it seriously. Aside from that one thorn in the side this has been an excellent reliable truck. 220,000 miles and still going strong. Anyway I'll get off here and hope to hear some good news. Thanks for reading
I've upgraded my 02 sequoia front brake with powerstop z36 kit. Comes with brake caliper, brake rotor, and extreme brake pads. Everything bolts right up and it really bites. The only thing you need to do is trim your brake dust shields.
 

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On the 01 there are 2 front brake options. Small caliper or big calipers (with respective rotors). I never understood why they even had the small brakes from the start..... Even a factory tow package 2001 comes with the small calipers... Anyways my point... on my 01 i installed a later model (I don't clearly remember the exact year 03 or 05 or 06) big calipers (found the OEM reman caliper thru napa auto to keep it with OEM hardware) Then i ordered i new set of rotors and pads from the stealership. After a small modification to the rock\debris cover plate everything fitted just right. My front end shake while braking been gone since then. Before applying this mod, i used to adjust the rear brakes every time the shake started and that seems to dampen it but not stop it. now i am very happy with it.
 

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This is just my opinion but the Gen 1 Tundra brakes are just fine but if you don't set your parking brake every time you park or at least once a week they are going to fail. I have a 5speed manual and put over 200k on my original brakes and they never pulsated or ever felt weak because every time I park I set my parking brake and this actively adjusts the rear shoes so they do their portion of the braking. I have even had a 700+ lb camper in the back of the truck for the past 16 years. When I replaced my front pads they still had life but I thought it was about time to get some new pads up there. Still on the original rears and the discs in the front are original and not warped. The rear shoes are adjusted by the setting of the parking brake so as they wear they need to always be adjusted and if you don't more and more of the braking will be done with only the front overloading and warping the fronts.
 

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I drove my 2002 Tundra for 18 years & 145k miles. When I sold it last year it still had all the OEM brake components. I changed the brake fluid 3 times and that is all.
 

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Has anyone found a good solution to the brake problem that the early tundras were born with? I've thought about upgrading to larger break system with vented rotors or if someone has done such an upgrade that has proven successful I would be happy to hear from you. I had new rotors and pads installed about 2 1\2 or 3 years ago and I can tell they are reaching the point of needing attention again before too long. I've had this done at least 7 to 8 times since I bought the truck new in 2001. It should have been noted in the owner's manual right below regular scheduled oil changes! I joke about it but because well it's the darn brakes I have to take it seriously. Aside from that one thorn in the side this has been an excellent reliable truck. 220,000 miles and still going strong. Anyway I'll get off here and hope to hear some good news. Thanks for reading
I have an '06 DC Tundra and I've had "Brake Problems" since the day I came home with 2 miles on the Odometer. I found that the real problem is the rear brakes. If you use the access hole to the star wheel and snug them up regularly, you get much better pedal feel/response, and your front pads don't wear out nearly as quickly. You WILL have to do rear brakes more often than once every 10 years, however.
 

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This is just my opinion but the Gen 1 Tundra brakes are just fine but if you don't set your parking brake every time you park or at least once a week they are going to fail. I have a 5speed manual and put over 200k on my original brakes and they never pulsated or ever felt weak because every time I park I set my parking brake and this actively adjusts the rear shoes so they do their portion of the braking. I have even had a 700+ lb camper in the back of the truck for the past 16 years. When I replaced my front pads they still had life but I thought it was about time to get some new pads up there. Still on the original rears and the discs in the front are original and not warped. The rear shoes are adjusted by the setting of the parking brake so as they wear they need to always be adjusted and if you don't more and more of the braking will be done with only the front overloading and warping the fronts.
I set my parking brake 100% of the time and I still need to adjust my rear brakes manually pretty much every quarter. Don't know why, but it's a huge improvement.
 

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Has anyone found a good solution to the brake problem that the early tundras were born with? I've thought about upgrading to larger break system with vented rotors or if someone has done such an upgrade that has proven successful I would be happy to hear from you. I had new rotors and pads installed about 2 1\2 or 3 years ago and I can tell they are reaching the point of needing attention again before too long. I've had this done at least 7 to 8 times since I bought the truck new in 2001. It should have been noted in the owner's manual right below regular scheduled oil changes! I joke about it but because well it's the darn brakes I have to take it seriously. Aside from that one thorn in the side this has been an excellent reliable truck. 220,000 miles and still going strong. Anyway I'll get off here and hope to hear some good news. Thanks for reading
Hi
I have 2002 Tundra 2wd V8. When the truck as was about 18 months old the dealer upgraded my front brakes to the 13wl brakes they or the larger brakes and they also upgraded my rear brakes for no charge and they this on a service bulletin.
 

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Greetings.
As my user name says, 2001 2wd that I purchased new, Currently 157k on the odometer. Original " small" rotors have been turned twice. Original rear shoes and drums. I use the parking brake every time I get out of the vehicle. I frequently towed a 3k lb + boat for 17 years. I did experience front end " shake" or " wobble", but I've learned not to ride the brakes on downgrades but to use the auto tranny to slow me down instead. I can safely downshift from D to 2 at about 40 mph while simultaneously using a little brake pressure. When I did get the front end shake it was after riding the brakes on steep downgrades. As far as self adjusting rear shoes, I learned long ago that those self adjusters don't always do the trick. It's not on my regular maintenance schedule but I do adjust them manually when rotating the tires or working on the front brakes. I'm thinking I will be replacing the rotors at my next brake job even though there may be enough material for another turn down. Unfortunately I've moved and lost my " go to" man for rotor turning and I don't trust the O'Reilys or Autozones to do it right. They like to run them through too fast and you can see the chatter marks once they are done. Hope this helps.
 

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If you want to fix it once and for all, you need to swap over to the 5th Gen 4Runner calipers 14WA and corresponding rotors, the rotors are aprox 1" larger diameter and 4mm thicker, you will also need to swap out the master cylinder and booster to the T100 1" master, the calipers need to have .100" milled off the inside of the mounting tabs where they meet the spindle pads to move the caliper centered over the rotor, other then trimming .5" off the T100 boosters threaded post that connects to the brake pedal.
The end results in the brake pedal being firm at the top of the travel and the braking being linear to the pedal pressure applied and no fading and or warping.

Regards,
Kent
 
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